Question about Meade LXD75 8.0"/203mm f/4.0 Telescope OTA with UHTC 08040001

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The images of deep sky objects (such as M31 M8 ...) I get with my LXD75 (SN 8") are faint. The images of the solar system (Moon, Jupiter...) are decent. Should I proceed to a collimation ?

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NO- the objects are much dimmer than the planets and your camera must take a LONGER exposure to get an image.

Collimation makes stars and planets "sharper" but NOT BRIGHTER.

Many deep sky objects require 10-15 minute exposures!

Posted on Aug 08, 2010

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Cant get an image.Is it right that the view finderimage is upside down


The image of all astronomical telescopes are upside down (SCTs are upside down and reversed). RACI (right angled, correct image) finders do produce a right-side up image. For daytime use a erect image prism eyepiece.
Follow below instructions (except 7 in your case)

  1. Get Stellarium or another fine astronomy program
  2. During the day, point the telescope at a part of the landscape about 100 yards away.
  3. Use the lowest power eyepiece (highest number) in the focal tube.
  4. Center the landscape object in the telescope.
  5. Align the finder scope so that it points exactly where the main telescope is.
  6. At night, leave the scope out to reach thermal equilibrium (about an hour for small reflectors and refractors)
  7. If the scope is on a EQ mount, polar align.
  8. Point the finder at the moon. The moon should be in the main scope also.
  9. Practice finding the moon before you start on the planets
  10. Once you are comfortable with the moon and planets, you can go for the deep sky objects

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Cant see anything through the view finder


1. During the day, use the 17mm eyepiece on a object outside (telephone pole, water tower, etc) then align the finder to what you see in the scope.
2. Put in the 7.5mm eyepiece and fine align the red dot finder.
3. At night, point the finder at the moon (less than half moon or the image is too bright without a moon filter) Use the 17mm eyepiece.
4. Once you see the moon, switch to the 7.5mm lens and enjoy.
5. Download Stellarium or any free astronomy software and see what is in your sky tonight. Your scope should be able to see Jupiter and its moons easily.(Saturn, Mars and Venus when the time is right) Open clusters like Pleiades will be nice is this fast scope.
5. If stars are not sharp, you may need to collimate the scope. Look online for general instructions.

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Can not see anything


Take the scope outside during the day time. Put the diagonal into the back of the scope and then put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the diagonal. DO NOT use the 2x barlow if you have one.

Practice focusing on a distant object.

Objects in the night sky are tiny and dim -- your scope must be pointed directly at them to see anything. The moon should be your first target at night.

By the way this is a diagonal:
http://www.amazon.com/Orion-1-25-Prism-Telescope-Diagonal/dp/B0000XMWYY/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1312469837&sr=8-6



www.telescopeman.org
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I have a new Brookstone compact telescope. The image in the smaller viewfinder is upside down making it difficult to line up with image in main telescope. Is this normal? And if so, any suggestions for...


Astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Telescope manuals recommend that you align the finder scope in daylight, by pointing the main scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

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1 Answer

Cannot sed anything in my brand new telescope. I have a full moon in the cross hairs of the viewfinder, but the moon is faint in the scope.


New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

It is best when you are starting out with a telescope to try it with the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the highest number) to begin with, until you become more familiar with how it works. Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

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Objects in the night sky are very tiny, smaller than the tip of your finger held at arms length. The scope must be pointed directly at them to see anything.

Download this free star chart:
www.skymaps.com

Install the free planetarium software Stellarium on your computer and put in your location:
www.stellarium.org

Both of these will help you learn the night sky. You have a small aperture scope use the eyepiece with the largest number on it. This will help you find things in the sky.

The moon should be your first target followed by the planet Jupiter, which is up in the evening sky right now.

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Have 46060525-cant see far?


This is a 60mm refractor, not much bigger than a 10x50mm pair of binoculars. You will be able to see a few of the brighter sky objects like the moon, Jupiter, Saturn, M42, M45 (part of it), you will have a very narrow field of view.

The 10x50mm binoculars would have been better for star gazing. Sorry.

Read my TIPS on my profile page.

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How to use telescope at night?


Many people have the same problem-- with these small telescopes you are stuck with seeing only the moon, and several other planets, and maybe a few bright star clusters.

These are all TINY objects (except for the moon).... when you look through the telescope you are looking at a section of sky about the size of your fingertip held at arms length-- the scope must be pointed DIRECTLY at the object. Practice on the moon first-- and then try to find Saturn which is up in the sky right now-- it looks like a dim (slightly yellow) star.

Download a free star chart at www.skymaps.com ---

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1 Answer

Hardin Optical Deep Space Hunter model DSH-6


Hi,
your telescope appears to be a newtonian reflector on a dobsonian mount. This type of scope is basically a point and shoot design, simplicity itself and many experienced astronomers swear by them, for there ease of use, set-up time etc.
The number 6 in the model number denotes the aperture (size of mirror) in inches. This is a good starter scope (much better than these small scopes that boast 525 X magnification) and with it tou will be able to clearly see Jupiters four main moons and the planets cloud belts. You will be able to see Saturn and it's ring system. Many nebulae, star clusters etc will become visable, that were invisible before.
Getting started with this kind of scope is pretty easy even for an absolute beginner. Set up the scope on a flat even surface, putting it all together should be self-explanatory. Insert the lowest power eyepiece (Usually the one with the biggest lens, and the one with the biggest number i.e. 40mm) and begin by pointing the open end of the scope at a bright object in the sky. To get you going with a bit of a buzz, I suggest Jupiter. Jupiter rises in the SE at 20.50, and is due South at around half past midnight, Look for a bright star that doesn’t twinkle to the right of the moon at about midnight, and that’s Jupiter!
Whilst looking through the eyepiece, carefully move the scope back and forth, up and down in the general direction of the planet. Remember, you are only looking at a very small part of the sky, probably about the size of a full moon.
It is unlikely your scope will be in focus at this stage so what you will find will probably look like a doughnut. When you find this “doughnut” you will need to focus. Adjust the focus knob until you see a crisp image of a small disk. If you are in Europe, you will see three bright moons (two on one side and one on the other) the fourth is hard to see tonight, but if you are lucky, you may glimpse a view of the shadow of this moon (Europa) as it crosses the disk. On the East coast of the US, you will also see three moons clearly, the fourth, Ganymede. Is still in Jupiter’s shadow at half past midnight, but by 1pm, it will become visible as it moves out of the shadow.
Keep looking for Ganymede during this half hour, it makes interesting viewing, and gives a sense of realism and motion to the whole event.
Try using different eyepieces as you become more accustomed to your scope, everything you see is upside down and back to front. Using different eyepieces will require re-focusing, but with a bit of practice, it will become second nature.
Finally, adjusting your finder scope. You will notice that the finder is held in place with two (sometimes three) adjustable screws. It may be best to set the finder scope up in the daytime. First find a distant object in the main scope (the further the better) a chimney pot on a distant roof etc. Then using the adjusting screws, centre the same object in the finder. It’s a bit fiddly at first, but you will get the hang of it. Then when night time comes, finding celestial objects is much easier. First locate the object in the finder scope, centre it, and the object should be in view in the main scope.
Hope this helps to get you going.

Kind Regards….Dave

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