Question about Heating & Cooling

7 Answers

Just bought a new 3 ton 16 seer Trane for a 1700 square foot house, but it is not cooling properly. I can't get the unit to drop below 75 degrees. I had the unit on for 2 ½ hours starting at 8:00am and it dropped from 76 degrees to 75 degrees. The installer failed to change the AC amps in the circuit breaker to 45. Currently the amps I have now is 36. Does that make any difference. It is 86 degrees outside. Any advice to my cooling problem. ? Thanks

Posted by on

  • 4 more comments 
  • chinds840 Aug 08, 2010

    The air coming into the house is cool, but not cold. I believe the theromstat is fine. Only had it 1 year, 7 day programmable Honeywell. Since the unit is brand new the install may not been done correctly. I am hearing 2 things: 1) The return near the air handler needs to be sealed up since it is causing a small leak making the unit work harder resulting in it not cooling properly inside the house (Exact words were: install to come out and seal up return at A/H will Duct Board) 2) The circuit breaker is running the AC part with 36 amps which is the old unit, this new unit requires a 45 amp and that is why the home is not cooling properly. Which one of these assessments are true if any? What is your opinion? Thank you.

  • chinds840 Aug 08, 2010

    Just bought a new 3 ton 16 seer Trane for a 1700 square foot house, but it is not cooling properly. I can't get the unit to drop below 75 degrees. I had the unit on for 2 ½ hours starting at 8:00am and it dropped from 76 degrees to 75 degrees. The installer failed to change the AC amps in the circuit breaker to 45. Currently the amps I have now is 36. Does that make any difference. It is 86 degrees outside. Any advice to my cooling problem. ? Thanks

    The air coming into the house is cool, but not cold. I believe the theromstat is fine. Only had it 1 year, 7 day programmable Honeywell. Since the unit is brand new the install may not been done correctly. I am hearing 2 things: 1) The return near the air handler needs to be sealed up since it is causing a small leak making the unit work harder resulting in it not cooling properly inside the house (Exact words were: install to come out and seal up return at A/H will Duct Board) 2) The circuit breaker is running the AC part with 36 amps which is the old unit, this new unit requires a 45 amp and that is why the home is not cooling properly. Which one of these assessments are true if any? What is your opinion? Thank you.

  • chinds840 Aug 09, 2010

    Ok, here is an update to my AC problem: Tech came out and reinstalled a new duct to the return in the air handler, and a new 45 amp was installed in the circuit breaker. The techs left at 2pm and the thermostat reading was 77 degrees in the house. I just walked in the door at 5pm (3hrs) and the temp is still at 77 degrees even though it is set at 74 degrees. The temp outside is 88 degrees. House still not cooling like it should although the air coming in is cool not cold. Can someone tell me what is going on? (please read entire thread) Thank you.

  • chinds840 Aug 09, 2010

    Cooling AC problem: Two years ago my old 10 seer 3 ton AC unit cooled the house pretty good even in the 88 degree heat. It at least lowered the temp in the house from 77 degrees to 74 degrees in a 3 hour span. This brand new Trane unit is not cooling like it should. What else can it be? (please read entire thread). Thanks

  • chinds840 Aug 13, 2010

    Thanks very much for the advice. I had technicians here for the past 5 days almost everyday diagnosing the non-cooling factor of the house. Although cool air is coming out the vents I would like to know if the unit is operating like it should since it is brand new - 1 week old. So, here is what I know - It is 94 degrees outside. The thermostat is set to 75, but it is 78 in the house. It has been 78 degrees for the past 3 hours. I took a reading of the air coming out the vents and they are at 62 degrees. The return where I put the air filter is reading 77 degrees. A 15 degree difference. Is everything running properly or do I still have a cooling problem? Thanks

  • chinds840 Aug 14, 2010

    Thanks very much for the advice. I had technicians here for the past 5 days almost everyday diagnosing the non-cooling factor of the house. Although cool air is coming out the vents I would like to know if the unit is operating like it should since it is brand new - 1 week old. So, here is what I know - It is 94 degrees outside. The thermostat is set to 75, but it is 78 in the house. It has been 78 degrees for the past 3 hours. I took a reading of the air coming out the vents and they are at 62 degrees. The return where I put the air filter is reading 77 degrees. A 15 degree difference. Is everything running properly or do I still have a cooling problem? Thanks (Please Disregard the original post and only answer this question, THANKS!)

×

Ad

7 Answers

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

  • Master
  • 43,501 Answers

Hi,
I would not get too excite4d about this yet...if you are 10 degrees cooler then the outside you are definetly cooling and the mass of the house is also warm because you have just started the unit...give it at least a day...more important is whether you are dropping the air temperaqture as it goes through the unit...it should be dropping at least 20 degrees. so if your house is 75 the air coming out of the vents should be 55.. if that is happening then you are cooling to the capacity of the unit.. if not then get them to come back and fine tune the charge...
36 Amps on a 3 ton unit is a bit high, but that can be affected by voltage and other factors...it is not high enough to be concerned about...

heatman101

Posted on Aug 14, 2010

  • chinds840 Aug 14, 2010

    Thanks. What are your thoughts about this: Thanks very much for the advice. I had technicians here for the past 5 days almost everyday diagnosing the non-cooling factor of the house. Although cool air is coming out the vents I would like to know if the unit is operating like it should since it is brand new - 1 week old. So, here is what I know - It is 94 degrees outside. The thermostat is set to 75, but it is 78 in the house. It has been 78 degrees for the past 3 hours. I took a reading of the air coming out the vents and they are at 62 degrees. The return where I put the air filter is reading 77 degrees. A 15 degree difference. Is everything running properly or do I still have a cooling problem? Thanks

×

Ad
  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Vice President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 100 times.

  • Master
  • 503 Answers

Hi,

Sounds like it might have been a dirty coil and possible dirty filter in the first place.Air flow restriction will cause the indoor coil temp. to drop and cause excessive sweating. A superheat or sub-cooling measurement should be made before any freon is added. An over-charge is bad for your A/C and wallet

OR

If the unit is working properly it should cool the home. Is your filter clean? Look and the evaporator in the inside unit. Is it frosted up? Do you have condensation water in the pan? Go to the outside unit and feel the air coming out of the fan. Is it warm? Now feel the 2 copper pipes coming out of the unit. Is the small one warm or hot? Is the larger one cool ? Is there moisture on it? Post back with results. Many apt. maintenence folks really don't know a lot about A/C.

Please post your feedback and Vote if the problem resolved as per your satisfaction.

Posted on Aug 13, 2010

  • Monika Arora
    Monika Arora Aug 14, 2010

    As you have mentioned that its only one week old so I would suggest you to contact the dealer where you have bought it, I believe problem is with the unit, You should have replace the unit.

×

Ad
  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Guru:

    An expert who has written 7 tips or uploaded 3 video tips

  • Master
  • 630 Answers

Flip the switch on the thermostat for the fan setting to FAN ON, not AUTO. This will run the indoor fan nonstop. The outside A/C unit will still cycle with a call for cooling from the thermostat. The constant air moving will keep you cooler. You can probably keep the thermostat a degree or two higher than normal and still feel comfortable. You will also maintain a more even temperature between upstairs and downstairs. This will SAVE you MONEY because the outdoor condenser will not come on as much! (3) Make sure that you wash the outside condenser coil once a year. If it's dirty, the A/C will run hot and inefficient. A sign of the coil being dirty is the small exposed copper (pipe) (tubing) line, usually 3/8" O/D connecting the inside unit with the outside unit will be HOT to the touch.
(4) If the small exposed 3/8" copper pipe connecting the inside unit with the outside unit is hot to the touch there can be several reasons why;
(a) A/C is low on refrigerant.
(b) The outdoor condenser coil is dirty. Those are the two most common reasons for it to be hot to the touch.

(5) "Warm Rooms" on the lower levels of the house where it is cooler cut back or cut off some vent registers (Diffuser) and make sure that all the ones on the upper floors where it is warmer are open all the way! Also, see paragraphs #2 & #9.
(6) "Doors" if you close the door to a room make sure that there is about a 3/4" gap between the bottom of the door and the floor. You may have had carpet put down on the floor and now there is no gap. This is necessary if you have a central return air duct in the hallway. The return air ducts need to pull the warm air from the room.
(7) Never leave the house and turn OFF the A/C. then come back home and turn it on and expect it to cool the house anytime soon. Doing this will not allow the unit to cool down the house for several hours. You can set the temperature up five to ten degrees but NOT OFF. This is because of Latent heat buildup in the walls and furniture in the house and will make the A/C work harder to remove the heat, this takes a long time.
(8) Never turn the A/C off than back on in less than five minutes, this will short-cycle the compressor and can trip breakers, blow fuses, or cause permanent damage the compressor. You should have a time-delay install on the A/C to prevent this during power outages! Some setback thermostats have a time-delay built-in. Having a start capacitor and relay is a good idea. This will increase the life expectancy of the compressor by starting faster thus keeping motor temperature down, using less electric to start.
(9) Keep blinds closed, curtains drawn, window shades drawn, a working attic fan would be a good idea, plenty of insulation in the ceiling & walls, air tight storm windows, keep outside doors and openings close, etc.
(10) "Icing of the indoor coil or the large insulated covered copper pipe "There are two main reasons for this, lack of air flow or low on refrigerant. Lack of air flow can be a dirty air filter, dirty indoor evaporator coil, dirty fan blades, damper in duct restricting air flow.


There should be a 15-20 degree temperature drop across the indoor coil at the air handler. Check the temperature drop in the duct close to the coil, if air coming into the coil is 75 degrees than the air leaving the coil should be 60-55 degrees. If it is higher or lower there is probably something wrong. Too high of a drop, IE more than 20 degrees drop, could mean lack of air flow or low on refrigerant. Less than a 15-degree drop could mean too much air flow, dirty outside coil or low on refrigerant.

Do NOT build a deck close to the top of the outside A/C or anything else that could cause the warm discharge air to re-circulate back to the unit. Fuses, Circuit Breakers or wires should never be hot to the touch; if they are hot you may have a sizing problem or a loose or bad electrical connection.

Call 1-800-533-7694 for more information about the PHCC.
Air-Conditioners DO NOT add cool air. What they do is remove warm air and put it outside. R-22 & R-12 ETC.. Refrigerant is a manmade product invented by DuPont and given the trade name FREON.
*****************************************************
The temperature of refrigerant is directly relate to the pressure it is at and vise versa, IE.R-22 at 0 psi is -40 degrees below zero or at 60 psi it at 32 degrees. This is misleading; the temperature change is NOT related to pressure really, but almost totally tied to the change from a liquid to a gas. When liquid Freon is expanded to a gas it gets really cold (latent heat of evaporation) and when the warm gas is compressed to a liquid it get hot. The temperature change in say compressing liquid Freon to a higher pressure (adiabatic compression) is small. You see the same effect when you crack the valve on a CO2 (or propane) bottle for example. You will get a smaller effect with a pure gas, like when you fill a Scuba tank, (gets warm) or drain it quickly (valve gets cold right at the expansion point, but this effect is not great enough to run an AC system.

The physics of phase change from a gas to a liquid and vice versa drive most weather for example as well.... With water it takes as (I recall) 560 (or was it 590...) times as much energy to boil water from 100 C liquid to 100C gas as it does to raise the same amount of water 1C in temperature. Freon is less dramatic than water in terms of this energy amount, but it boils at a much more convenient temperature for human AC units than does water. If you wanted the inside of your house to be 100C you might want to run water in your AC.
FYI only.
Over sized A/C will run short cycles and not remove the humidity and moisture from the house, an under sized unit will not be able to keep the house cool on a hot day. You MUST be careful to get the correct size A/C for your house. A/C's are sized by tons; there are 12,000 BTU'S to a ton of cooling. ("Ton" means 12,000 BTU'S of heat is needed to melt one 1 ton (2,000 Pounds of ice) You need to move 400 CFM of air per ton of cooling across the indoor coil. 450 CFM for Heat Pumps. Each CFM (Cubic foot per minute) of air will carry 26.7 BTU's of cooling. You need a heat-gain calculation done per room to get the proper (CFM/BTUs) to be delivered to each room and the total (Tons/BTUs) needed to cool the house based on designed weather conditions in your area.

Posted on Aug 09, 2010

  • 1 more comment 
  • JOHN DAVIDSON Aug 10, 2010

    Let us not forget the "new" a/c units no longer are allowed to use freon R22, they are now using a "new" environmentaly friendly ozone safe freon named R410A, hwere are some facts on the comparison of the new versus the older unite, the same complaints have been going around in the automobile industry as they to changed from freon R12 to eco friendly R134A.



    A properly charged and sized modern 410a system will cool about as efficiently and effectively as an older one, but it seems like you want to get a little deeper. Well, you basically want a substance with a high enthalpy of vaporization and a boiling point lower than your target temperature across the pressure gradient. Compressibility factor is also important, this is the deviation from ideal gas behavior at a given temperature and pressure. The higher the compressibility factor, the better the refrigerant. R-11 and R-12 are the gold standards for refrigerants, R-12 can carry more heat at a given pressure, but R-11 can hit normal target temperatures at much lower pressure gradients (the compressor doesn't have to be as big). Neither of these refrigerants are used anymore in first world countries.

    R-22 is being slowly phased out, as you know. It was a good refrigerant, but it hurt the world just like R-11 and R-12. Puron R-410a is a proprietary azeotropic mixture of two different refrigerants, R-32 and R-125. It does not exhibit ideal refrigerant properties and to overcome this constraint, operating pressure gradients are much higher. This means bigger compressors, larger energy consumption, larger heat sinks, and lower efficiencies for a given target temperature. It works fine, but it sure isn't R-22 and it sure as heck isn't R-12.




    Systems that are designed for R410a should be fine but in general it isn't as good as R22 and there may be issues when we have record highs much as R134a automobile airconditioners aren't quite as good as R12 but it's only an issue on the very hottest of days, the operating range of R134a simply isn't as broad as that of R12, and it's a similar situation with R410a and R22.

  • JOHN DAVIDSON Aug 10, 2010

    I just purchased a small in the wall unit, and found that they still had R 22 units in the size and model I needed so I took it over the newer R410A freon charged units, it works fine with a good seer rating as well.

  • chinds840 Aug 13, 2010

    Thanks very much for the advice. I had technicians here for the past 5 days almost everyday diagnosing the non-cooling factor of the house. Although cool air is coming out the vents I would like to know if the unit is operating like it should since it is brand new - 1 week old. So, here is what I know - It is 94 degrees outside. The thermostat is set to 75, but it is 78 in the house. It has been 78 degrees for the past 3 hours. I took a reading of the air coming out the vents and they are at 62 degrees. The return where I put the air filter is reading 77 degrees. A 15 degree difference. Is everything running properly or do I still have a cooling problem? Thanks

×

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

  • Master
  • 11,800 Answers

No problem with the amps, your unit draws less than 32 amps.
Your problem is the fact that the power of the unit is a bit small compared to the size of your house, especially if you have an badly insulated house with single pane windows.  Either get a bigger unit or start insulating your house - start with the windows and doors.

Posted on Aug 09, 2010

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 500 times.

  • Master
  • 2,047 Answers

The problem with your cooling system is more likely to be from the amps that were not changed. Air conditioners just like refrigerators work based on the current which is supplied to them. If the current is not enough they tend to cool improperly and drop temperatures.
Get the installer to change the amps in the circuit breaker to 45 and observe how the unit functions. If it does not function properly then the unit is faulty but this is a long shot. The problem is most definitely from your amps.
Hope this solution has been helpful?

Posted on Aug 08, 2010

  • chinds840 Aug 08, 2010

    Thank you. I was wondering if the amps made a difference or not. What are your thoughts about this: 1) The return near the air handler needs to be sealed up since it is causing a small leak making the unit work harder resulting in it not cooling properly inside the house (Exact words were: install to come out and seal up return at A/H will Duct Board) Could this also be the cause of the unit not cooling properly?

  • Rockme
    Rockme Aug 08, 2010

    The hole could also be a cause of the problem. get the hole blocked up and the amps changed this would ensure your system works fine.
    Thanks for the update. Hope this solution has been helpful?


×

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

  • Master
  • 3,247 Answers

If the circuit breaker was not of adequate rating then it would trip. If this not happening then the 36 amp rating is adequate. In order to find out if the unit is sized and installed correctly you will have to find out if the compressor is running continuosly or is it turning on and off now and then. If the compressor is turning on and off and the set temperature is not reaching, then thermostat is not ok. But if the compressor is running continuously and the set temperature is not reaching, then the compressor may be leaky.

Also check if the fan is set on high speed and not in economy. Please provide the actual model no. of your Trane system.

Posted on Aug 08, 2010

  • Sam Aug 08, 2010

    I noticed you have given my suggested diagnostic a 2 finger rating but I am not sure you have not given any response to my posting. It would help me respond to your problem better if you give me some reason why you did not think I was giving you an adequate response.

×

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

  • Master
  • 4,323 Answers

Hi


If cooling is not there then you'll need to check the thermostat, it may be off or set incorrectly. Reset thermostat to a desired temperature and check. It may have happened that the indoor unit is running but outdoor is not. If the outdoor unit is not running then the Air coming through your vent will be warm. Try turning off your thermostat for 1–3 hours to see if it will reset. Also, inspect the circuit breaker and fuses. If the breaker is tripped and/or a fuse is blown, check the unit for grounds or shorts. Check the control and power circuits for shorts or grounds.

Hope this helps... If it does please do not forget to accept the solution or post back for assistance.

Daniel

Posted on Aug 07, 2010

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Why is my unit unable to cool my house more than 15 degrees below outside temp?


probably a tonnage issue. unless you have 12 inches of insulation in the attic i like to go with 400 sq. ft. per ton in the houston area. our humidity is so high it will not keep a cold enough coil to wring moisture out of air. all a/c systems are designed to operate at 95 degree ambient. when you get to 102 and more the effienecy drops off quick.

Jul 03, 2014 | Amana Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

A/C supply and return plenum is too small. How to I fix it?


that square footage should have 4 tons. rule of thumb 400 sq. ft. per ton. your problem would indicate not enough return that is why it is sucking so much.

Aug 05, 2012 | Goodman Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

My Goodman CK361D unit blows cold air from the vents and it is cold when you stand there. But it doesnt seem to push it throughout the house. we can run it for hours and it will still be over 70 degrees in...


There are alot of factors when dealing with this problem. Heat Load ( Typical A/C unit is designed with a split of 20 degrees farenheit.) If you measure the temperature leaving the discharge registers, the temperature should be around 20 degrees colder than the air entering the return air grille (Filter Location). Also your unit seems to be a 3 ton; In which this system is designed for roughly 450 sq. ft. per ton and can go as high as 550 sq. ft. on newer homes with more than adequate insulation values. On older homes with minimual insulation the 400- to 450 sq.ft. rule per ton should be observed. Another reason could be that the units needs servicing like a dirty condenser coil or evaporator coil, improper refrigerant charge, etc can all be issues that can result in your problem.
Finally, most typical units or designed to maintain a home 20-25 degrees below outside temperature. Example 95 degrees outside, inside should not be set lower than 70 to 75 degrees, and the 5 degree range depends on the SEER (Seasonal Energy Efficiency Rating/Ratio ) of your unit. Hope I was helpful in giving you some direction in things to look for to resolve your problem.

Jul 05, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

I'm looking to purchase a Rudd 2 stage model, 16 SEER, 5 ton along with a 100000 BTU 95% furnace. I have a two story home and will only be using the 1 AC. Will the Rudd cool both floors?


Assuming that there are ducts ran upstairs and downstairs, it all depends on the square footage of the living spaces, i.e. bedrooms, living room, dining room, etc. You need an average of 1 cfm per sq ft. For every 1 ton of air, you have an average of 400cfms. So your 5 ton unit will cool/heat 2000 sq ft. A 16 seer unit with a 95% furnace is a nice buy and you will notice the difference for sure. Hope this helps!

Aug 03, 2010 | Ruud Central System Air Conditioner

1 Answer

Can I mix brands/tons when installing AC unit to existing coils?


First off - the 'rule of thumb' is 600' per ton of Air Conditioning. In other words your old unit is a 2 ton unit. So - 2 tons x 600' = 1200'. As you can see if you install the 2.5 ton unit - you will be installing a AC that 'could' cool a 1500 sq ft house (2.5 x 600' =1500 sq ft.). Slightly more than what you need; and the 3.5 ton unit is 'way to big,' (3.5 x 600' = 2100 sq ft.).

Note: fyi - many in the AC business will sometimes refer to tonnage in btu's, i.e. 1 ton = 12000 btu - hence a '2 ton unit' can also be referred to as a 24000 btu unit and vice versa.

So... from the above - you can easily see that "2 tons" of Air conditioning is what is required to cool the 'average' home of 1100 sq ft. "roughly speaking."

Note: it is always best to have a professional 'size' your cooling/heating needs.

One of your questions was could you 'mix tonnage?'

The answer is 'usually you don't mix the tonnage of your outside/inside units.' However, professionals sometimes do (mix the tonnage) in certain situations, and installing a 2.5 ton outside unit with an existing 2 ton inside unit is often done, however, there are some 'tech issues' here and - I would "again" recommend that you call a Service Tech to help you with the sizing/mixing of your cooling/heating needs.

hope this has helped

Jun 20, 2010 | Carrier 38CKC036 Air Conditioner

1 Answer

Need help on tonnage question


I would have an air conditioning contractor do a heat load calculation and give you and estimate. 3 ton may work if your insulation is good and your windows seal well. 4 ton may be too much and you won't get the humidity removal needed in Florida.

Mar 04, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

3 ton condensor and 2.5 air handler


I hate to use rules of thumb but 500sqft per ton depending on your windows and insulation. you are probably ok with a 2.5 ton however it will not work with a 3 ton outdoor unit as you have figured out. depending on how long that ac has been in you may want to replace it with a 2.5 ton due to the damage to the compressor valves because of the mis match. or if the indoor is newer and the original system may have been a 3 ton then i would replace the A/H. and be prepared to replace the outdoor if the valves are to far gone. If the trane is a new high effiency 2 and the goodman is just a 10 SEER you may be able to have a txv installed on the trane unit and a kickstart device outside. but only if its a high effiency but their again if the A/C fails you couldnt have a high effiency 3 ton you would have to drop down to 2.5,

Sep 22, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

Air conditioner constantly running, not cooling house


Check and see if it is froze up. Check big line at outside unit for ice. check filter and replace as needed. Check outside fan to see if it is running. Wash out outside coil If fan and compressor are running and has hot small line at outside unit. If not froze up and coil is clean you will need to call in a pro. If compress over heated you may need to wait for it to restart if coil was dirty. Again make sure out door fan and or unit is running and clean.

Jun 29, 2009 | Goodman CKL49AR49 Air Conditioner

1 Answer

I recently bought a 4 ton 14.5 SEER Rudd Spilt system using R-410 and matching Rudd furnace. This system replaced a Lennox 10 SEER 4 ton unit. Now that it has gotten hot in Baton Rouge LA 90-93 degrees....


Sounds like the Unit might be low on charge.But without correct readings not sure.
The new unit with 410 will actually cool better due to higher boiling point temp. of freon type.Poor air circulation could also cause problem.Such as dirty filter, too slow fan speed,dirty coil.Also could have obstruction in freon lines either at pump,in line set,or in coil.
Get someone u trust to check it out and ask for their Rudd Dealership Training Credentials.

Jun 15, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

We installed a 4 ton downflow coleman air handler with evap coil Model number 1854s2m we did not change out the outside unit. the outside unit is a 13 year old 3 1/2 ton intertherm condenser the system is...


you have a missmatched system, for it to work try removing the orfice on the high side txv it is not allowing the evaperator coil to fill with refrigerant properly coleman and intertherm dont like each other since they control a large market in the manufactured housing heating and cooling units electricaly connecting the componets together no issue prefromance sometimes is the issue hope this helps

May 06, 2008 | Heating & Cooling

Not finding what you are looking for?
Heating & Cooling Logo

Related Topics:

143 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Heating & Cooling Experts

paulcarew

Level 3 Expert

2514 Answers

Dan Webster
Dan Webster

Level 3 Expert

8220 Answers

Donni Steen

Level 3 Expert

659 Answers

Are you a Heating and Cooling Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...