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Salter PS250 digital floor scale. Male 5 pin XLR plug was pulled off the cable from the display unit (not the scale platform). I can re-solder the connections but need the color code/pin numbers for the wires. Wires are red, green, blue and yellow but none of the colored insulation remained on the plug to indicate which wire was on which pin. Thanks Phil

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I see your problem and am about to shut down.What I would like to suggest for now is that if you can carefully remove the back from the display and I would think the female in there would match color for color with the plug that was pulled.If you do not want to try that,I could research it as well as possible tomorrow.The display most likely is screwed down and secured well enough so that it won't fall to pieces if the back is taken off.If that doesn't work or doesn't appear right if you do open it,let me know.Good luck Phil! Greg.

Posted on Aug 07, 2010

  • 9 more comments 
  • obiecat596 Aug 09, 2010

    Sorry for the slow response. Unexpected delays. Thanks for the suggestion. It almost worked but not quite. In this case, the female side is also on a cable. So, access was fairly easy, other than a lot of hot glue type material was used as additional strain relief when it was manufactured. It covered all the pins/wires, obscuring which color went to which pin. Once I cleared away enough material to see the pins, it turns out they used different color wires on the female side for some reason. The cable has 7 colored conductors, plus a braided, unjacketed conductor. On the damaged, male side, it's obvious the soldered wires were green, red, blue, yellow and braided. On the intact female side, pin 1 is brown, pin 2 is orange, pin 3 is white, pin 4 is green, pin 5 is braided. So, it looks like I really need a schematic for the display/male side to know which wire goes to which pin. Do you think that info is available or am I out of luck for DIY repair? Hope that's enough info. Let me know if you need more.
    Thanks again,
    Phil

  • obiecat596 Aug 09, 2010

    Sorry for the slow response. Unexpected delays. Thanks for the suggestion. It almost worked but not quite. In this case, the female side is also on a cable. So, access was fairly easy, other than a lot of hot glue type material was used as additional strain relief when it was manufactured. It covered all the pins/wires, obscuring which color went to which pin. Once I cleared away enough material to see the pins, it turns out they used different color wires on the female side for some reason. The cable has 7 colored conductors, plus a braided, unjacketed conductor. On the damaged, male side, it's obvious the soldered wires were green, red, blue, yellow and braided. On the intact female side, pin 1 is brown, pin 2 is orange, pin 3 is white, pin 4 is green, pin 5 is braided. So, it looks like I really need a schematic for the display/male side to know which wire goes to which pin. Do you think that info is available or am I out of luck for DIY repair? Hope that's enough info. Let me know if you need more.
    Thanks again,
    Phil

  • obiecat596 Aug 09, 2010

    Sorry for the slow response. Unexpected delays. Thanks for the suggestion. It almost worked but not quite. In this case, the female side is also on a cable. So, access was fairly easy, other than a lot of hot glue type material was used as additional strain relief when it was manufactured. It covered all the pins/wires, obscuring which color went to which pin. Once I cleared away enough material to see the pins, it turns out they used different color wires on the female side for some reason. The cable has 7 colored conductors, plus a braided, unjacketed conductor. On the damaged, male side, it's obvious the soldered wires were green, red, blue, yellow and braided. On the intact female side, pin 1 is brown, pin 2 is orange, pin 3 is white, pin 4 is green, pin 5 is braided. So, it looks like I really need a schematic for the display/male side to know which wire goes to which pin. Do you think that info is available or am I out of luck for DIY repair? Hope that's enough info. Let me know if you need more.
    Thanks again,
    Phil

  • obiecat596 Aug 09, 2010

    Sorry for the slow response. Unexpected delays. Thanks for the suggestion. It almost worked but not quite. In this case, the female side is also on a cable. So, access was fairly easy, other than a lot of hot glue type material was used as additional strain relief when it was manufactured. It covered all the pins/wires, obscuring which color went to which pin. Once I cleared away enough material to see the pins, it turns out they used different color wires on the female side for some reason. The cable has 7 colored conductors, plus a braided, unjacketed conductor. On the damaged, male side, it's obvious the soldered wires were green, red, blue, yellow and braided. On the intact female side, pin 1 is brown, pin 2 is orange, pin 3 is white, pin 4 is green, pin 5 is braided. So, it looks like I really need a schematic for the display/male side to know which wire goes to which pin. Do you think that info is available or am I out of luck for DIY repair? Hope that's enough info. Let me know if you need more.
    Thanks again,
    Phil

  • obiecat596 Aug 09, 2010

    Sorry for the slow response. Unexpected delays. Thanks for the suggestion. It almost worked but not quite. In this case, the female side is also on a cable. So, access was fairly easy, other than a lot of hot glue type material was used as additional strain relief when it was manufactured. It covered all the pins/wires, obscuring which color went to which pin. Once I cleared away enough material to see the pins, it turns out they used different color wires on the female side for some reason. The cable has 7 colored conductors, plus a braided, unjacketed conductor. On the damaged, male side, it's obvious the soldered wires were green, red, blue, yellow and braided. On the intact female side, pin 1 is brown, pin 2 is orange, pin 3 is white, pin 4 is green, pin 5 is braided. So, it looks like I really need a schematic for the display/male side to know which wire goes to which pin. Do you think that info is available or am I out of luck for DIY repair? Hope that's enough info. Let me know if you need more.
    Thanks again,
    Phil

  • obiecat596 Aug 09, 2010

    Sorry for the slow response. Unexpected delays. Thanks for the suggestion. It almost worked but not quite. In this case, the female side is also on a cable. So, access was fairly easy, other than a lot of hot glue type material was used as additional strain relief when it was manufactured. It covered all the pins/wires, obscuring which color went to which pin. Once I cleared away enough material to see the pins, it turns out they used different color wires on the female side for some reason. The cable has 7 colored conductors, plus a braided, unjacketed conductor. On the damaged, male side, it's obvious the soldered wires were green, red, blue, yellow and braided. On the intact female side, pin 1 is brown, pin 2 is orange, pin 3 is white, pin 4 is green, pin 5 is braided. So, it looks like I really need a schematic for the display/male side to know which wire goes to which pin. Do you think that info is available or am I out of luck for DIY repair? Hope that's enough info. Let me know if you need more.
    Thanks again,
    Phil

  • obiecat596 Aug 09, 2010

    Sorry for the slow response. Unexpected delays. Thanks for the suggestion. It almost worked but not quite. In this case, the female side is also on a cable. So, access was fairly easy, other than a lot of hot glue type material was used as additional strain relief when it was manufactured. It covered all the pins/wires, obscuring which color went to which pin. Once I cleared away enough material to see the pins, it turns out they used different color wires on the female side for some reason. The cable has 7 colored conductors, plus a braided, unjacketed conductor. On the damaged, male side, it's obvious the soldered wires were green, red, blue, yellow and braided. On the intact female side, pin 1 is brown, pin 2 is orange, pin 3 is white, pin 4 is green, pin 5 is braided. So, it looks like I really need a schematic for the display/male side to know which wire goes to which pin. Do you think that info is available or am I out of luck for DIY repair? Hope that's enough info. Let me know if you need more.
    Thanks again,
    Phil

  • obiecat596 Aug 09, 2010

    Sorry for the slow response. Unexpected delays. Thanks for the suggestion. It almost worked but not quite. In this case, the female side is also on a cable. So, access was fairly easy, other than a lot of hot glue type material was used as additional strain relief when it was manufactured. It covered all the pins/wires, obscuring which color went to which pin. Once I cleared away enough material to see the pins, it turns out they used different color wires on the female side for some reason. The cable has 7 colored conductors, plus a braided, unjacketed conductor. On the damaged, male side, it's obvious the soldered wires were green, red, blue, yellow and braided. On the intact female side, pin 1 is brown, pin 2 is orange, pin 3 is white, pin 4 is green, pin 5 is braided. So, it looks like I really need a schematic for the display/male side to know which wire goes to which pin. Do you think that info is available or am I out of luck for DIY repair? Hope that's enough info. Let me know if you need more.
    Thanks again,
    Phil

  • obiecat596 Aug 09, 2010

    Sorry for the slow response. Unexpected delays. Thanks for the suggestion. It almost worked but not quite. In this case, the female side is also on a cable. So, access was fairly easy, other than a lot of hot glue type material was used as additional strain relief when it was manufactured. It covered all the pins/wires, obscuring which color went to which pin. Once I cleared away enough material to see the pins, it turns out they used different color wires on the female side for some reason. The cable has 7 colored conductors, plus a braided, unjacketed conductor. On the damaged, male side, it's obvious the soldered wires were green, red, blue, yellow and braided. On the intact female side, pin 1 is brown, pin 2 is orange, pin 3 is white, pin 4 is green, pin 5 is braided. So, it looks like I really need a schematic for the display/male side to know which wire goes to which pin. Do you think that info is available or am I out of luck for DIY repair? Hope that's enough info. Let me know if you need more.
    Thanks again,
    Phil

  • Greg McCarthy Aug 09, 2010

    It's okay about the response.I have searched for schematics for many items and they are not available for free online.User manuals yes.A lot of good that does.The wire colors not matching up,I guess they want you to pay for it to be repaired or something,who knows.It's BS.It is best probably to replace it.You could try calling the manufacturer to see if they will provide the information or see about a price for a schematic.TV makers will not even allow access to consumers for that information.I couldn't find their site but it is worth a try to see what they will offer you for information.

    Good luck Phil! Greg

  • obiecat596 Aug 09, 2010

    Thanks for the info. I thought it might be hard to find. I'll keep looking for a bit. I've got a couple options. The item is too expensive to replace at this time.
    Thanks again. Phil

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Here are the photos:


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