Question about Computers & Internet

2 Answers

Minimum partition in xp? - Computers & Internet

Posted by on

Ad

2 Answers

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 500 times.

  • Master
  • 2,571 Answers

From what I can read, 2GB is the minimum, but they recommend 10GB

Posted on Aug 06, 2010

Ad
  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 500 times.

  • Master
  • 2,340 Answers

Minimiun partition is "1" partition. Best is not to exceed your Partitions to more than "4" on a single your hard drive.

Posted on Aug 06, 2010

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

How to resove the error message "system does not minimum requirement to install this driver" while installing window xp 32-bit drivers on 64-bit notebook(thosiba-C640-11N)?


maybe your notebook is not compatible for xp64 bit try to upgrade in win7 x86 that's much better :))

dont worry on your file it will not be deleted unless you delete your partition. the folder name is "windows.old" that is the folder where save your old files from xp

Apr 01, 2012 | Computers & Internet

Tip

How to Dual Boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista





cf85f95.jpg


If you're dying to try out Windows 7 but aren't ready to give up your installation of XP or Vista, let's take a look at how to dual boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista.



Assuming you've already downloaded a fresh copy of Windows 7, you'll need to burn it to a DVD in order to do a fresh installation. To handle this task, grab a copy of the most popular CD and DVD burning tool ImgBurn, burn the ISO to a DVD, and move right along to step 1.



Step 1: Partition Your Hard Drive Before you go installing Windows 7, the first thing you need to do is create a new partition on your hard drive to hold the new installation of Windows. Partitioning your hard drive will vary depending on whether you're running XP or Vista—namely because Vista has a partition tool baked in, XP does not.
Partition Your Hard Drive in XP To partition your hard drive in Windows XP, you'll need to download some sort of third-party partitioning software. There are a lot of options available, but I prefer to stick with the previously mentioned GParted live CD, a free, open source boot CD that can handle all kinds of partitioning duties.


To use it, just download the GParted Live CD, burn it to a CD, then reboot your computer (booting from the disc). You'll boot right into the partitioning tool. HowtoForge's previous guide to modifying partitions with GParted is a great place to start, but it's a fairly basic procedure:
  1. Resize your current OS drive to free up enough space for a Windows 7 partition (the minimum system requirements ask for 16GB).
  2. Create a new partition from the newly freed space.
  3. Apply your changes.
Partition Your Hard Drive in Vista The folks at Redmond were kind enough to include a disk partitioning tool in Vista if you know where to look. So go to Control Panel -> System and Maintainence (skip this one if you're in Classic view) -> Administrative Tools -> Computer Management. Once you launch the Computer Management tool, click on Disk Management under the Storage heading in the sidebar. It's partitioning time.

Luckily we've already gone down this road before in step-by-step detail, complete with pictures, so check out our previous guide to creating a new partition in Vista. In a nutshell, you'll need to shrink your current OS partition to free up at least 16GB of disk space (per the Windows 7 minimum system requirements), then create a "New Simple Volume" from the free space. Step 2: Install Windows 7 Now that you've done all the heavy lifting, it's time for the easy part: Installing Windows 7 on your new partition. So insert your Windows 7 disc and reboot your computer (you'll need to have enabled booting from your DVD drive in your system BIOS, but most PCs will have this enabled by default).

Once the DVD boots up it's a simple matter of following along with the fairly simple installation wizard. When you're choosing installation type, be sure to select Custom (advanced) and choose the partition you set up above. (Be careful here. Choosing the wrong partition could mean wiping your other Windows installation altogether, so make sure you pick the new partition you just created.) After you select the partition, go grab yourself a drink and let the installer do its work. Windows will run through some installation bits, restart a few times in the process. Eventually you'll be prompted to set up your account, enter your license key, and set up Windows. Keep your eyes open for fun new Windows 7 features, like your new homegroup (and the accompanying password). When it's finished, you're up and rolling with your new Windows 7 installation.

Congratulations! You should now have a new entry for Windows 7 on your boot screen when you first start up your computer. You've now got all the tools necessary to dual-boot Windows 7 and XP or Vista—or even to triple-boot Windows 7, Vista, and XP.


































on Jul 07, 2010 | Computers & Internet

Tip

How to Dual Boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista


If you're dying to try out Windows 7 but aren't ready to give up your installation of XP or Vista, let's take a look at how to dual boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista.
Step 0: Download the Windows 7 Beta and Burn It to a DVD
Assuming you've already downloaded a fresh copy of Windows 7, you'll need to burn it to a DVD in order to do a fresh installation. To handle this task, grab a copy of the most popular CD and DVD burning tool ImgBurn, burn the ISO to a DVD, and move right along to step 1.

Step 1: Partition Your Hard Drive
Before you go installing Windows 7, the first thing you need to do is create a new partition on your hard drive to hold the new installation of Windows. Partitioning your hard drive will vary depending on whether you're running XP or Vista—namely because Vista has a partition tool baked in, XP does not.
Partition Your Hard Drive in XP
To partition your hard drive in Windows XP, you'll need to download some sort of third-party partitioning software. There are a lot of options available, but I prefer to stick with the previously mentioned GParted live CD, a free, open source boot CD that can handle all kinds of partitioning duties.
To use it, just download the GParted Live CD, burn it to a CD, then reboot your computer (booting from the disc). You'll boot right into the partitioning tool. HowtoForge's previous guide to modifying partitions with GParted is a great place to start, but it's a fairly basic procedure:
Resize your current OS drive to free up enough space for a Windows 7 partition (the minimum system requirements ask for 16GB).
Create a new partition from the newly freed space.
Apply your changes.
Partition Your Hard Drive in Vista
The folks at Redmond were kind enough to include a disk partitioning tool in Vista if you know where to look. So go to Control Panel -> System and Maintainence (skip this one if you're in Classic view) -> Administrative Tools -> Computer Management. Once you launch the Computer Management tool, click on Disk Management under the Storage heading in the sidebar. It's partitioning time.
Luckily we've already gone down this road before in step-by-step detail, complete with pictures, so check out our previous guide to creating a new partition in Vista. In a nutshell, you'll need to shrink your current OS partition to free up at least 16GB of disk space (per the Windows 7 minimum system requirements), then create a "New Simple Volume" from the free space.
Step 2: Install Windows 7
Now that you've done all the heavy lifting, it's time for the easy part: Installing Windows 7 on your new partition. So insert your Windows 7 disc and reboot your computer (you'll need to have enabled booting from your DVD drive in your system BIOS, but most PCs will have this enabled by default).
Once the DVD boots up it's a simple matter of following along with the fairly simple installation wizard. When you're choosing installation type, be sure to select Custom (advanced) and choose the partition you set up above. (Be careful here. Choosing the wrong partition could mean wiping your other Windows installation altogether, so make sure you pick the new partition you just created.)
After you select the partition, go grab yourself a drink and let the installer do its work. Windows will run through some installation bits, restart a few times in the process. Eventually you'll be prompted to set up your account, enter your license key, and set up Windows. Keep your eyes open for fun new Windows 7 features, like your new homegroup (and the accompanying password). When it's finished, you're up and rolling with your new Windows 7 installation.
Congratulations! You should now have a new entry for Windows 7 on your boot screen when you first start up your computer. You've now got all the tools necessary to dual-boot Windows 7 and XP or Vista—or even to triple-boot Windows 7, Vista, and XP.

on Dec 08, 2009 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Good day Sir/Madam my windows is not want to open ,when i try to install the operating system it says i must create partition and when i create it it says the minimum of a partition is 8 megabite and...


no OS stated, it has an operating system what it it.
Windows ? Linux, OS2 what?
IT IS 16 YEARS OLD, 2001 PC. WHY Mess or speed cash on something that has zero value?
it came with windows 2000
are you trying to put say W7 (the oldest currently supported MS OP)? here>
the oldest PC here has only a 16GB hard drive.
W7 will never fit that in a millions years.

XP fits, but is a VIRUS magnet, why be in the news headlines
IZia gets, Cyber-attacked? do not be a virus magnet, upgrade.
ok?


to install say XP
first erase the whole, HDD.
if the F10 key is dead, (HPs restore partition recovery is dead.)
you then buy HP media kit for this PC from HP.
then using it erase the whole HDD.
now XP fits.

in a used computer store here, for $20 we have 10year old pC for sale. USA< not 16 years. ones this old are crushed and recycled.

May 20, 2017 | Compaq Evo N600c Notebook

2 Answers

How to dual boot xp and vista?


Hi,

First of all partition a drive up. Make sure its a large capacity drive, something well over 100GB.

Boot the computer with CD/DVD set as the first boot device and pop the XPmag-glass_10x10.gif CD in the drive and allow setup to begin. When you come to the screen where you select the drive partition you should see the drive listed with all the space listed as unpartitioned. If the drive was in use previously, you'll need to delete all the existing partitions. To do this you'll have to hit the 'D' key followed by the 'L' key. The screen instructions will be visible to guide the process.

Once all the existing partitions are deleted the display will show the total unpartitioned disk space.
Hit the 'C' key to create a partition. Personally i partion mine to 80GB (81920MB)

On the newly created partition, (not the raw one) install XP on that. Carry on with the installation until its final restart, it will be a light blue screen.

Quickly pop the Vista disk into the drive and start the Vista install. When it askes where you want Vista choose the unallocated partition. If you let XP load up first then you will not have the dual boot option on start up.

If you have done this correctly then each time the computer restarts during Vista install you see a boot message on screen saying "older version of window(XP) and Vista.

Lets Vista fully install right up until it loads the welcome screen. Then you can restart the computer, choose older version of windows to complete and load the XP operating system.

You then have to switch between them both to install drivers, software etc.

If you want to use both operating systems at a time then you need a virtual operating system installed but they are not that good as memory is kept at a minimum.

Good luck and please post back if you need anymore advice.


Regards.

Jul 15, 2010 | Biostar MCP6P-M2 Motherboard - v6.0,...

2 Answers

Have a Gateway that I cannot load Windows XP on, but loads Linux Mint 7 with no problem. This confuses me. The XP program is good, can load on other PCs, but not this Gateway. This is my brothers computer,...


Make sure your PC has the minimum requirements for XP. It would help to know what errors you are getting when you try to install XP.

• PC with 300 megahertz or higher processor clock speed recommended; 233 MHz minimum required (single or dual processor system);* Intel Pentium/Celeron family, or AMD K6/Athlon/Duron family, or compatible processor recommended
• 128 megabytes (MB) of RAM or higher recommended (64 MB minimum supported; may limit performance and some features)
• 1.5 gigabytes (GB) of available hard disk space*
• Super VGA (800 x 600) or higher-resolution video adapter and monitor
• CD-ROM or DVD drive
• Keyboard and Microsoft Mouse or compatible pointing device



Mar 06, 2010 | Gateway 700 X PC Desktop

1 Answer

From 16Gb to 12Mb


use partition magic to see all the partition and make partition of your choice.

Oct 16, 2009 | Electronics - Others

2 Answers

How much partition do i need on a 10gb hard drive to install windows xp pro


You need 1.5 GB minimum free disk space. Partition size is not relevant, provided you have one with that much disk space available. Best practice on a drive that size is make a single 10 GB partition.

Apr 15, 2009 | IBM Computers & Internet

2 Answers

Help me


It is a pretty simple process

Create 3 partitions on the HDD (Vista requires 20 GB minimum)

Install XP on 1st, Vista on 2nd, Linux on 3rd

You'll choose the partition to install on during the install process of each OS, you can create the partitions during the XP install

Jun 08, 2008 | Dell Inspiron 1501 Notebook

Not finding what you are looking for?
Computers & Internet Logo

Related Topics:

13 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Computers & Internet Experts

Doctor PC
Doctor PC

Level 3 Expert

7733 Answers

kakima

Level 3 Expert

102366 Answers

David Payne
David Payne

Level 3 Expert

14161 Answers

Are you a Computer and Internet Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...