Question about Nikon D3000 Digital Camera

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When I change my focus from manual to automatic the camera doesn't take pictures. It will attempt to focus but then it will focus and it will be blurry and it won't take the picture, then it repeats. But the manual setting works fine :/

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Auto mode is the point-and-shoot mode. It is not the camera problem. It is a common problem amongst nikkor kit lenses. Get your lens checked to the dealer, or any Nikon customer care. If its under warranty, it'll be replaced.

Posted on Aug 06, 2010

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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How do I set my sl620 to selective focus.


Your camera is a point and shoot. This means the camera does auto focus when you want to make a picture. The focus point is in the square in he middle of the screen. The only thing you can change is when you want to make macro pictures. The camera will try to find a focus point within 2 or 3 feet.
Ion some scenes, the focus will differ just a little, like in sports, it will try to be automatic.
The trick every professional photographer uses, is place the focus point on the part, you want to have in focus in your picture. Then press the shutter release button half and wait till the camera is in focus. Then reframe the picture as you want it to be. Then press the button fully. Just as described on page 31 of the manual.
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May 04, 2014 | Cameras

1 Answer

Blurry pictures


I don't know how much experienced you are with a digital camera. Don't even know you have any experience with any camera. But the modern camera's are capable of taking sharp pictures, is used right.
But to let the camera do its work correct it should be setup correct and used correct.
Let me explain.
Most camera's have a possibility to make pictures in automatic. (dail on the green camera symbol) But still there is more to do.
Every camera has a point (or more points, that are used to focus the picture. You can use to put that point where you want the picture be in focus. Most of the time that would be the centre of the frame. But the camera can't focus in theoretical a blink of an eye. It needs some time, to find the focus by differences in contrast, or patterns. A DSLR sometimes can focus in less then a tenth of a second. Compact camera's could need up to one second, before they are in focus.

So try to setup the camera to automatic. Place the focus marks (as described on page 6 of the manual. Then press the shutter realise button half and look if the camera can focus. If it can't, release the button and try again. When the pictures is in focus, then you can press the button fully.
On page 33 of the manual, there are different modes of focus. be sure you use the mode you chose in the correct way.

link to the manual I refer to.

Nov 27, 2013 | Kodak EasyShare M530 Digital Camera

1 Answer

How do I set the resolution on my Canon SD850?


The instructions for changing the resolution are on page 30 of the manual.
If the pictures are fuzzy, increasing the resolution won't help. The most likely causes of fuzzy pictures are as follows
1) Focus. Check to make sure the focus is on the subject. If something else in the picture is sharp while others are not, then the camera may have focused on the wrong subject.
2) Subject motion. If moving objects are fuzzier than stationary objects then you need to use a faster shutter speed (or flash).
3) Camera motion. Just because the camera is on a tripod doesn't mean it doesn't move. One philosophy says that if a tripod is light enough to be carried then it's not sturdy enough. For a compact camera like the SD850 that likely isn't the problem. However, you can still shake the camera when you press the shutter release button. Try setting the self-timer. This allows time for the vibrations to die down before snapping the picture.
In your particular case, I think we can assume that the subject isn't moving, so #2 doesn't apply. To assure proper focus, make sure the painting is flat and perpendicular to the lens axis. If the painting is tilted relative to the camera, then different parts of it will be at different distances and the camera won't be able to keep all of it in focus.
Also, make sure the front of the lens is clean.

Feb 03, 2012 | Canon PowerShot SD850 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

Hi Ref: Digital Camera - Pentax K200 model It keeps auto focusing when in manual mode. Regards Chris


Putting the camera in manual mode still doesn't change the focus routine. If you want manual focus, there is a switch near the lens on the left allowing AF (auto focus) and MF(manual focus).

May 01, 2011 | Pentax K200D Body only Digital Camera

1 Answer

Canon Rebel xti - auto focus problem


AI should be focusing. You really can't change many settings when you are shooting in auto mode. Is the lens in AF mode?

I'm sure you have long since returned from vacation!

Hope this helps!

Dec 31, 2007 | Canon EOS 400D / Rebel XTi Digital Camera

2 Answers

Better Focus


There are several factors that can contribute to getting better focus and improved results. 1. Auto Focus / Auto Exposure lock. Press the shutter button down HALF WAY. The camera will attempt to adjust exposure to the current lighting environment for maximum benefit. Then the camera will automatically correct the focus based on objects in the center of the display. This process usually takes about two to three seconds. 2. Be sure not to cover the sensor on the front of the camera with your finger. This will disable the automatic focus and exposure controls. 3. Only us the MACRO MODE for CLOSE-UP photography. Be sure to use MACRO MODE if you are taking pictures of an object at less than six inches away. Be sure not to use Macro Mode for Normal Photography. Using MACRO MODE improperly will result in poor focus (also known as 'fuzzy pictures').

Sep 11, 2005 | Toshiba PDR-3330 Digital Camera

1 Answer

The best situation to use each of the shooting modes


The shooting modes are described as follows: AUTO (Factory default setting) Auto mode is used for regular photography. The camera automatically makes the settings for natural color balance. Other functions, such as the flash mode and metering, can be adjusted manually. Portrait Portrait mode is suitable for taking a portrait-style picture of a person. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Night scene Night scene mode is suitable for shooting pictures in the evening or at night. The camera sets a slower shutter speed than is used in normal shooting. If you take a picture of a street at night in any other mode, the lack of brightness will result in a dark picture with only dots of light showing. In this mode, the true appearance of the street is captured. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. If you use the flash, you can take pictures of both your subject and the night background. SCENE Scene mode enables you to select one of the following scene shooting modes available in the menu. Landscape + Scene shooting Landscape + Scene shooting is suitable for taking pictures of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. This mode produces clear, sharp pictures with excellent detail, making it ideal for shooting natural scenery. Landscape + Portrait shooting Landscape + Portrait shooting is suitable for taking photos of both your subject and the background. The picture is taken with the background as well as the subject in the foreground in focus. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting settings QuickTime Movie Quicktime Movie mode lets you record movies. The focus and zoom are locked. If the distance to the subject changes, the focus may be compromised. Landscape Landscape mode is suitable for taking pictures of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Self-portrait Self-portrait mode enables you to take a picture of yourself while holding the camera. Point the lens towards yourself, and the focus will be locked on you. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. The zoom is fixed in the wide position and cannot be changed. My Mode Enables you to make settings manually and register them in the mode dial's mode so you can call up your own shooting mode whenever you want. Program shooting (P) Program shooting allows you to shoot using an aperture and shutter speed that the camera sets. You can set the flash, white balance, or other functions manually. Aperture priority shooting (A) Aperture priority shooting allows you to set the aperture manually. The camera sets the shutter speed automatically. By decreasing the aperture value (F-number), the camera will focus within a smaller range, producing a picture with a blurred background. Increasing the value will let the camera focus over a wider range in the forward and backward directions, resulting in a picture in which

Sep 04, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-60 Zoom Digital Camera

1 Answer

Shooting modes


The shooting modes are described as follows: PROGRAM AUTO (Factory default setting) Program Auto mode is used for regular photography. The camera automatically makes the settings for natural color balance. Other functions, such as the flash mode and metering, can be adjusted manually. Portrait Portrait mode is suitable for taking a portrait-style picture of a person. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Landscape Landscape mode is suitable for taking pictures of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Night scene Night scene mode is suitable for shooting pictures in the evening or at night. The camera sets a slower shutter speed than is used in normal shooting. If you take a picture of a street at night in any other mode, the lack of brightness will result in a dark picture with only dots of light showing. In this mode, the true appearance of the street is captured. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. If you use the flash, you can take pictures of both your subject and the night background. Self-portrait Self-portrait mode enables you to take a picture of yourself while holding the camera. Point the lens towards yourself, and the focus will be locked on you. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. The zoom is fixed in the wide position and cannot be changed. QuickTime Movie QuickTime Movie mode lets you record movies. The focus and zoom are locked. If the distance to the subject changes, the focus may be compromised.

Aug 31, 2005 | Olympus Camedia D-395 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Focusing Difficulties


1. Typical problem subjects for autofocus 1) Very low-contrast subjects 2) Overlapping nearby and distant objects 3) Very bright subjects in the center 4) Subjects moving very fast 5) Subjects through glass Focus on an object that is at the same distance as the desired subject, apply Focus Lock, and then recompose the picture. Or set the lens focus mode switch to (or), and focus manually. (Manual focus is only possible with cameras providing this feature.) 2. Attempting to take pictures out of the camera's shooting distance: When taking pictures out of the camera's shooting distance, the subject will be out of focus. The shooting distance differs from each camera model. Please check the specifications of your camera in the instruction manual to determine the shooting distance.

Aug 29, 2005 | Canon PowerShot SD10 / IXUS I Digital...

1 Answer

Focusing Difficulties


1. Typical problem subjects for autofocus 1) Very low-contrast subjects 2) Overlapping nearby and distant objects 3) Very bright subjects in the center 4) Subjects moving very fast 5) Subjects through glass Focus on an object that is at the same distance as the desired subject, apply Focus Lock, and then recompose the picture. Or set the lens focus mode switch to (or), and focus manually. (Manual focus is only possible with cameras providing this feature.) 2. Attempting to take pictures out of the camera's shooting distance: When taking pictures out of the camera's shooting distance, the subject will be out of focus. The shooting distance differs from each camera model. Please check the specifications of your camera in the instruction manual to determine the shooting distance.

Aug 29, 2005 | Canon PowerShot SD100 / IXUS II Digital...

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