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Hi, When ever I try and copy files to my Hard Drive Model SF320, the disk keeps skipping and the entire copying of files have to be done again. It gets very annoying most of the times. Please let me know what can be done to fix the issue. What is the power supply needed for the drive.

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If your usb hard drive is upto 500gb thenit don't require external power but if it is more than 500gb then it require external power.
And try to format the whole drive and recreate the partition on the hard drive. This will solve your problem.
For further help or to thank me . Mail me on my email Ejaz89@live.com

Posted on Aug 06, 2010

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Dell inspiron 1525 can't boot up, keeps on saying hard drive cannot be found. What could be the problem. Tried safe mode and it did not work, tried installing the operating system again without luck,...


Hi there,
please check if you can remove and reinsert the hard drive from its's location. usually you would have to remove 3 or 4 screws on the bottom part of the laptop and slide the hard drive out. once it's out put it back in and make sure that it's tightly on its place.
If this does not work you may have to replace the hard drive because the message means that it cannot detect the hard drive and it might just have to be replaced.

Jun 07, 2011 | Dell Inspiron 1521 Notebook

1 Answer

My system doesn;t boot up and I don't have the CD to boot up my system. When I brought the powerbook G3 it didn't with the CD. Please where can I get it from? I am in Ghana now. Thanks Ishmael


If you have another Macintosh that is working correctly, you can copy the contents of that hard-drive, including the Operating System onto an external hard drive.
To do this, install Carbon Copy Cloner on the working machine and plug in an external hard-drive. Then run Carbon copy cloner and make the source the computer's hard drive most likely named "Macintosh HD". Then choose to have your external hard drive be the drive where all of the data is copied. Then run the program and let it copy all of the files.
Once this is done, remove the external drive from the computer and plug it into your G3. Turn on your G3 while holding the Option (alt) key and then double click on the hard-drive image that is named whatever your external hard-drive is named.
Once your system boots up from the external hard drive, run Carbon Copy Cloner again and repeat the process again except have the source be your external drive and have the internal drive in your G3 be the disk that has all the data copied to it. Once this is done, turn off your computer, remove the external drive, and then boot up your computer again.
You will have an exact clone of the computer that you copied the data from and will just simply need to adjust the account settings as such as you see fit.

The external drive process can be skipped if you have a firewire cable. Simply connect the firewire cable to both computers and when you turn on your G3, hold the "T" key. This will turn your G3 into an external hard drive and you just have to carbon copy the files straight to your computer's internal hard drive.
If you do not have access to another computer mac computer, then you will need to go to the Apple Store and see if the Genius Bar can install the default operating system that your computer came with.
If for some odd reason you have the contents of an Mac OS install disc copied onto a flash drive or external hard drive, you can boot from that and use it in place of a disc.

Apr 15, 2011 | Apple PowerBook G3 Mac Notebook

1 Answer

Hiya. how come certain files dont copy to my san disk cruzer slice? there comes a message saying 'type of file error' and it tells me to skip.please help me out as i need to back up some files.thaks


If you KNOW what file types these are (eg: .doc or .jpg) try making a copy of one, rename it to the appropriate file and see if that works

(example, you have a word file that is say.. me.doc. make a copy, call it me2.doc, delete the file extension (.doc) then rename it with the file extension again before saving it.. Sometimes this works.

If that does not work, try copying to a different usb disc or device, if it does work, you should reformat and check the san disc for potential future failing

Jan 27, 2011 | SanDisk 2GB Cruzer Micro SDCZ62048A10 Hard...

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I have a 320 USB External Hard Drive i store the data it is fine but when i try to copy the file from external hard disk it is getting an error "Cannot Copy CZ9EXML" & it will disconnects i...


> cannot copy CZ9EXML

Is this a file currently on the disk-drive? If so, then the blocks on the disk-drive "owned" by the file have gone "bad" -- those blocks cannot be correctly read.

It's a little surprising that a "full" FORMAT did not detect those blocks as being "bad", and mark those data-blocks as "never-to-be-used".

Avoid trying to read that file.

This might be an "early" indication that your disk-drive is going to fail.
Do *NOT* keep the *ONLY* copy of your files on the Transcend!

Nov 13, 2010 | Transcend StoreJet 320 GB USB 20 Hard...

1 Answer

When trying to restore my u series 9, (ST3160022ACE) ultra ATA 160 gig hard drive I get this message: Restore was not successful. Remove any USB or Extra Hard drives taht are connected. I have no USB or...


If by "restore" you mean that you are reinstalling Windows onto the disk-drive, to restore Windows to the "as-shipped-from-the-factory" condition, then a failure of that operation can be caused by either of three conditions:

* I/O errors reading files from the CD/DVD disks (due to dust/fingerprints on the bottom of the disks),

* I/O errors writing files to the disk-drive,

* an intermittent problem with the computer's motherboard or RAM, causing "random" failures when using the computer.

So, on another computer, take the CD/DVD disks, and try to copy the entire contents (namely up to 4.7 GB) onto the 'C:' drive, watching for any "I/O errors" during the file-copy operation.
If the file-copy completes successfully, then the copy of the files can be deleted.

If no errors occur, then it's time to suspect that the disk-drive itself is failing.
Buy a new disk-drive, and disconnect the old disk-drive, and connect the new disk-drive,
and restart the "restore" operation. If the "restore" fails on the new disk-drive,
then it's time to suspect that the motherboard has a problem.

Nov 03, 2010 | Seagate Computers & Internet

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Hi,\r\n When i plug in my Western Hard Disk WD4000ME, its detected by the system and all files are shown, but I cannot copy those files back to the system. It gives the following error:- "The requst could...


An I/O error indicates an issue with the device driver(s) that handle input/output processes such as copying files to/from hard drives, data in resident memory (RAM) waiting to be processed by the CPU or the controller chipset that handles the primary calls to/from the subsystems or a faulty hard drive.
Below are a few solutions that may help resolve the issue and allow you to transfer your files:
Before proceeding, you will need the following:
A. Computer B. External USB Hard Drive C. USB Cable D. RAM Module (Replacement, if necessary) E. Hard Drive (Replacement, if necessary) F. USB Hard Drive Enclosure (Replacement, if necessary) G. USB Cable (Replacement, if necessary)
Note: Solutions B/C apply only to Windows OS.
Solution A. Faulty USB Cable
1. Replace the USB cable. 2. Connect USB hard drive to the computer. 3. Attempt to copy a file from the drive. 4. If successful, copy additional files, as needed. If not successful, skip down to Solution B, step #1.

Solution B. Locked I/O Processes
1. Press and hold the power button on your desktop/laptop for about 10 seconds (or until the system has powered off completely). Then release the power button. 2. Make sure the USB drive is plugged in. 3. Wait another 10 seconds and press the button once again to power on the computer. 4. Once logged in, attempt to copy a single file from the drive 5. If successful, go to step #6. If not successful, skip down to Solution C, step #1. 6. Continue to copy files from the drive. Make sure to pay attention to what files (if any) prompt the I/O error message. If you receive an I/O error, skip down to Solution C, step #1.

Solution C. Motherboard Device Driver Installation/Update
1. Click on the "Start" menu and click on "Control Panel". 2. A new window will open, double-click on "System". 3. A new window will open, click on "Device Manager". 4. A new window will open, listed in the hierarchy are all the hardware components installed on the desktop/laptop. Look for any devices that display either a red "X", yellow "!" or yellow "?". These devices have either incorrect, incomplete or missing drivers/software and need to be installed, as they might be the root cause of the trouble. 5. If any of the above icons are present, perform a Windows Update by visiting the site below:
http://update.microsoft.com
Perform any updates available on the software and hardware side. 6. Restart your computer. 7. Follow Solution C, steps #1-4 to determine if any drivers still need updates. 8a. If updates are not needed, attempt to copy files from the hard drive. If successful, go to step #9. If not successful, skip down to Solution D, step #1. 8b. If updates are needed, you may need to visit the support site for your desktop/laptop's make/model and download any missing drivers. 9. Continue copying files, as needed.

Solution D. Faulty RAM
1. Power off the desktop/laptop and disconnect all cables. 2. Open the desktop/laptop. 3. Remove all the existing RAM. 4. Install the replacement RAM. 5. Power on the desktop/laptop. 6. Connect USB hard drive. 7. Test by copying some files from your hard drive. 8. If successful, close your desktop/laptop and continue copying files, as needed. If not successful, remove replacement RAM and reinstall previous RAM and skip down to Solution E, step #1.

Solution E. USB Hard Drive Case Faulty I/O Board
1. Power off computer/desktop and disconnect all cables. 2. Open your USB external case. 3. Remove your existing hard drive. 4. Install hard drive into replacement USB case. 5. Power on your computer. 6. Connect your USB external drive. 7. Copy files from your external USB hard drive. 8. If successful, continue to copy files, as needed. If not successful, skip down to Solution F, step #1.

F. Hard Drive Malfunction
1. Power off computer/desktop and disconnect all cables. 2. Open your USB external case. 3. Remove your existing hard drive. 4. Install replacement hard drive into USB case. 5. Power on your computer. 6. Connect your USB external drive. 7. Copy files from your external USB hard drive. 8. If successful, continue to copy files, as needed. If not successful, this could be an indiction of a much larger problem in the form of a Motherboard issue.
If the motherboard is malfunctioning, this is a sign of bigger things to come and will require a replacement board in order to correct.
In the event that the motherboard needs replacement, depending on the make/model of the desktop/laptop, the cost could range from $35-120 for 3rd-party boards or $85-300+ for consumer-level systems from manufacturers such as HP, Dell, etc. and $350-1000 from Apple.
If your desktop/laptop is still covered by the manufacturer's warranty or 3rd-party extended warranty, any hardware component that needs replacement should be covered at little to no out of pocket expense to the end-user. This also includes the external USB hard drive, as well.

Aug 15, 2010 | Western Digital Passport 320GB External...

1 Answer

How do I get past installation when I get a cyclic redundancy error? Using Windows Vista


Hello ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

Try this....

The cyclic redundancy check, or "CRC" error, indicates a bad spot on your hard drive. The fact that you're seeing it when you try to copy a file indicates that the bad spot may be within the file itself.
We need to verify that and then we need to try to recovery your file and repair your hard drive.
First, let's make sure that the problem is actually with the file you're copying since it's equally likely that the problem is with the location you're copying too. This is easy. Fire up a Command Prompt window, and then copy the file to NUL:
Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
(C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.

C:\>CD (to wherever the file is located)

C:\wherever>copy Outlook.pst NUL
1 file(s) copied.
This reads the entire file by copying it "nowhere". If this succeeds, the problem is not actually with the file itself, but the location you were trying to copy it to. My recommendation would be to copy it to a different disk entirely, or a different machine on your local network.
If this copy fails, then we've confirmed that the bad sector on your hard disk is actually being used by some portion of your file.
Now that we've confirmed that the problem is in fact in the file itself, we need to make as best a copy of it as we can, somewhere else. This sets a position of "it can't get any worse than this". Some data within the file may be lost, but you'll have copied as much as possible before the recovery efforts.
Once again, we want to copy the file to some different hard disk, or some other machine on your local network. And once again we need to do this within the command prompt:
Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
(C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.

C:\>CD (to wherever the file is located)

C:\wherever>xcopy /c Outlook.pst D:
1 file(s) copied.
Two important things to note here: we've used the xcopy (for eXtended copy) command, and we've added the"/C" switch which keeps copying even if errors are encountered. As you've already experienced, the default behavior of both COPY and XCOPY is to stop if an error occurs.
Now that we've got a "no worse than" backup copy, we can start attempting to repair the disk.

SpinRite is a hard drive recovery and maintenance program. When you run it, it will perform a lengthy and exhaustive analysis of your hard disk without modifying its contents. Exactly how it does what it does is probably too technical and lengthy for this space, but one of the most important things that it does is simply this:
If a bad sector can be recovered, SpinRite will recover it."My recommendation would be to copy it to a different disk entirely, or a different machine on your local network."And many, though of course not all, bad sectors can be recovered using SpinRite.
The net result is that after running SpinRite on the drive, it will either recover the sectors and you'll have a good, working hard disk once again, or it won't - and you'll know with some confidence that the disk cannot be recovered.
In the first case, if SpinRite is actually able to recover the sector for you, then unless SpinRite tells you otherwise, I'd then happily reboot and continue using the hard drive.
If SpinRite is unable to recover some data on your hard drive, I would first reboot into Windows and, as we did above, make another copy of the file. While SpinRite may not have recovered all the bad sectors on your hard drive, it could have repaired some, and those might have been the ones causing the problem with the file you're trying to access. I would not overwrite our first "no worse than" copy, but I would save this new file, as a kind of "possibly better" copy. And then I'd plan on replacing the drive.

If you're not up for spending the money for SpinRite, then Window's own CHKDSK utility is the next best thing. It's not as thorough, and it doesn't perform the same deep analysis and recovery as SpinRite, but it can, in fact, recover from some types of hard disk failures.
Once again, in the Command Prompt:
Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
(C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.

C:\>CHKDSK /R
The "/R" parameter indicates that CHKDSK should check for errors and repair them as best it can.
Important: if this is your system drive (most often C:), this command will not actually run the operation immediately, but will schedule it for the next reboot. You'll need to reboot to actually make it happen.
After it's done, try making another copy of the file. If it doesn't work, then obviously CHKDSK wasn't able to repair the error you're experiencing. If it does, however, save that copy as a possibly fixed copy of your file.
Even if CHKDSK does repair the problem, I'm actually torn on how much to continue to trust the hard disk. You could still experience future failures.
Though I suppose that's true for any hard disk, after any utility is used. Or not.

At this point, if none of the steps above have repaired the bad sector or otherwise recovered your file, you're just a little bit screwed.
It's now time to work with the best-effort file that you saved earlier and, depending on what kind of file it is, try to recover the contents. In your example, an Outlook PST file, that means running scanpst on it, which will scan the contents of the file and attempt to recover what it can. There most likely will be data loss. Sometimes a lot of data loss. That's why I encourage you to never run utilities like scanpst on your only copy of the file. You always want the original to go back to in case there's something else in it that you can recover manually.
For other types of files and applications, it'll depend entirely on the specifics of that application as to how it will deal with a partially corrupt file, and whether or not it can be repaired.

And that brings me to my last point.
If this was your only copy of the file - if you would have suffered significant data loss had this file become corrupt - you haven't been backing up.
Start.
This was a wake-up call. Even if we successfully recovered your file, you should be very scared.
Start backing up your important data. Now.
The next time there's a problem, you may not be as lucky.

Jul 06, 2010 | Arcsoft ShowBiz® DVD 2 Full Version for PC

3 Answers

Windows xp pro will not boot with new hard drive


Its hard to tell just like this without having the computer in hand to check and test the jumpers and connection and all, but quick like this i think it might be a trojan virus that corrupted the boot sectors of the old hard drive, and when you copied the stuff from the old to the new, the virus followed and infected the boot sectors of the new one too. Try to reformat completely using the original windows install disk, and not the system restore/reinstall disk and reinstall windows after the format with the original windows disk again. If I was right, it should boot up OK with a fresh format and reinstall with the real windows CD, then install a virus scan and a spyware scan and scan and clean the old drive completely 2 or 3 times to be sure theres nothing bad left on it, then try to copy the whole disc, but skip the Windows repertory, the Program Files one too and the Documents and settings one also, cause those 3 are the ones most prone to corrupting a fresh install even if there is not any viruses in them. If it does not boot up OK after formating and reinstalling Windows though and says it's unbootable, then either there is a config error in the BIOS of the laptop, or the IDE controller that drives the disk is defective. If it's the BIOS settings, it's gonna be easy enough just changing the settings and won't cost you too much, and if its the IDE controller... then that's another story cause it's integrated in the motherboard like any other computer, so basically another computer will cost less than a new motherboard for a laptop. So if that is the case and the IDE controller is shot, you can still try to use an external USB drive to run the computer but not all computers support booting from the USB though, so before buying a brand new external drive, check the BIOS first to see if it does support USB booting.

Jul 08, 2009 | Compaq Evo N610C Notebook

1 Answer

Need to transfer copied files to x301 after full restore


create a new folder in your hard-disk and first try to copy 1-2 files from the external hard-drive to the new folder (copy any data/work/images you have stored/created not any files of windows folder or root of c: drive)

if the above copy works then copy back all except the c: root and these folders - Windows folder, Document & settings, Program Files

May 30, 2009 | Lenovo ThinkPad X301 2776 Notebook

1 Answer

Copy dvd from hard drive


This can be done, but when you copy the file to your HDD, you need to copy it as an ISO file. Then when you go to make a disk from it, you burn the ISO file to the disk.

Feb 05, 2009 | Navarre 123 Copy Dvd Gold for PC

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