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Contactor not pulling in on 24 volts after changing out all parts: defrost board, contactor, cap, fan relay, transformer and heat sequence

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Set the thermostat so that the a/c should be on. Make sure you have 24vac at the contactor. If you don't recheck your wiring. Also you can go to the thermostat and install a jumper between R and Y. The contactor should pull in. If it does, your thermostat may be the problem. Let me know what you find so I can offer more advice.

Posted on Aug 06, 2010

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Coleman furnace dgaa077bdta


The control fuses keep blowing tells me one or more of the control that operate the control on 24 volts is malfuctioning. Most controls operate at about 5 watts and on a clamp on amp meter normally pull about 0.2 amp (p = current x voltage, 5 watts = 0.2 amps x 25 volts) I install 75 watt 24 volt transformer with a resettable overload to save on fuses. I reset the transformer and quickly go to the controls and determine the amp draw. When I find the one >0.2 amps I found the problem. The things to check is the emergency heat sequencer, fan control sequencer, reversing valve for heat pumps, main contactor on the condensing unit and any other 24 volt control loads. I have had to replace the themostat wire because the increase current for the thermostat wire can cause the entire length of wire to form a long heater and cause insulation degradationa and cause the thermostat wire to short out and blow the fuses.
Hope this helps

Aug 30, 2014 | Coleman Mobile Modular Home Gas Furnace...

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How it works: Central AC Contactor


Magnetic relays commonly known as definite purpose contactors are used in a variety of different applications throughout the HVAC and Appliance world. They can have anywhere from 1 pole or up to 4 poles or more. The coils on them can be 24 volt 120 volt 240 volt or even 440volt and better.02c6373.jpg Their main job is to power compressors and fan motors on various equipment. On a home unit the contactor is almost always a 24 volt, 2 pole, 30 amp one. Some smaller units have what is known as a pole and a half. or 1.5 poles. The coil pulls down only one side of the contactor, while the common leg has a straight bar across it. On home units smaller thermostat wires connect to the 24 volt coil powered by a transformer.When the temp rises the thermostat calls for the contactor to yank down and power up the compressor and fan outside. If those small wires are chewed up by an animal or a weed eater then power to the coil cannot do its job. Very often the 24 volt coil on the base of the contactor just dies. A couple videos I found on line will give an idea of various types used in home units. A guy had a unit which would not shut down because of fried welded together contacts. He did an autopsy of the old part. I thought it was cool.

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on Aug 21, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

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Why won't the compressor run


This can be for a variety of reasons. It ranges from something as simple as no supply power (blown fuse, open breaker, faulty contactor, or run capacitor) or it could be more serious as a grounded or open winding in the compressor motor. My suggestion to any novice and or person without proper tools and knowledge; First check the low voltage (24 volt control voltage) by turning on the "Fan on" switch located on the thermostat to on, not "Auto" The blower fan should come on, indicating there's 120 volt and 24 volt available. Fan doesn't come on is an indication that there's no control power. The next step would be to check for power at the transformer and fuse located in the air handler. There should be 240 volts feeding the transformer, and 24 volts coming out. The control voltage is needed to operate the thermostat (which is the switch that sends the 24 volt signal to the compressor contactor to turn the compressor on/off. This 24 volt also powers other relays and switches in the system. knowing that 24 volt is available also tells you that the problem is most likely in the condensing unit (outside, where the compressor is located). At the condensing unit you should check for 240 volt supply power. Upon finding 240 volt supply power the question now becomes whether or not the thermostat is calling for anything (cool or heat if the unit is a heat pump). There should be 24-30 volt available at the small gauge wires feeding the contactor coil. While having the thermostat set at a temperature lower than the current room temperature (in the cooling mode) the thermostat should send a 24 volt signal to close the compressor contactor and turn it on. The non-metallic end of a screwdriver can be used to depress the moveable part of the contactor. After pushing in the contactor, should the compressor start then you may only need a new contactor. It may just hum because of a faulty run capacitor or grounded or shorted internal motor windings (grounded or shorted windings are usually indicated by tripped circuit breaker and/or blown fuse). It's a good idea to have a good multi-meter and knowledge of use before attempting any repairs or diagnosis on your own. I recommend some basic knowledge of electricity before even thinking about attempting any repairs or diagnosis.

May 08, 2014 | Goodman Manufacturing Goodman GSC130421...

1 Answer

Reset the contactor relay


the contactor does not have a reset button 24 volts will energize a magnet and pull the contactor in you can also manually push in the contactor for testing purposes the airhandler has the transformer which produces 24 volts this power then goes to the tstat then you select a mode which then goes to the contactor you most likely have a blown fuse on the circuit board or simular problem the contactor could have shorted causing this

Jun 27, 2012 | Goodman Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Hard-wiring for a 4 ton heat pump


I cant really explain in detail every wire goes to X, However
All units regardless of design will have common requirements electrically .
As you know the power is 2 hot legs of 115v and a ground for the high voltage side, and 24 volts for the control circuits.The 230v will enter on the contactor,some use 1 leg, some both, some use the start winding as a crancase heater and will not be opened by the contactor.
That said the L1 and L2 legs will go to Common and Run terminals on the compressor, the run cap will be run and start, a start cap with a potential relay will be 5 to common, 2 to start and 1 to 1 side of the start cap the other side of the start cap is Run so the leg that goes to run will be run to run to run, run winding to run cap to r on start cap.
most use PTC THERMISTOR START ASSISTS SO THE OLDER RELAY i DESCRIBED MAY NOT BE THER HAVING A START ASSIST THAT SIMPLY WIRES IN PARALELL TO THE RUN CAPS TERMINALS R AND S or run and start.
The defrost is exactly how a domestic ****** works, time AND temp
initiated, time OR temp terminated, using a mechanical timer as Ranco E15 or a solid state board if newer, 1 leg of the condenser fan will be ran through the defrost timer as wll since defrost is just AC mode with the condesnser fan off, and the strips will temper the air so not to cool the home as the units defrosting . the sequence of operation and types of relays will matter, but at this type of communications I cant get much more detailed, without specifics, the low voltage is as any AC except with a Orange for reversing valve thast is energized in heat or cool mode, try O and if opposite put the wire on B on the stats subase.

Feb 24, 2012 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Rheem RPGB-37JAS. I purchased Defrost Control Kit 47-102684-83 to replace old defective one. Old board had wires on terminals labeled 18-30 VAC, COM, DEF RELAY, and HOLD. New board has terminals labeled...


C- is common/ground of the board FM transformer
R-is 24 volts to the board FM transformer
B- is to energize reversing valve for heat from thermostat.
D- energizes the electric heat in defrost mode.
Y-comes from the thermostat and energizes the compressor and condenser fan motor by pulling in the contactor.

Feb 11, 2011 | Ruud UAKA042 Air Conditioner

1 Answer

Wiring diagram for Thermoking V700MAX


Red or R is the "Hot leg" of the Transformers 24volt supply,
Common or C is the "Neutral leg" of the Transformers 24 volt supply;
and the side of power to which ALL the 24 volt control circuits
terminate to complete the circuit, example; Heat=W, Cool=Y, Fan=G.
Upon a call for heat a switch closes betwen the Red and White Thermostat terminals.
The stat sends the 24 volts to White or W for the heat circuit on W on the
furnaces LVTB low voltage terminal board.
Yellow or Y goes from Thermostat to furnace Y on LVTB, which is simply
a connecting point on its way to the AC units 24v contactor coil located outdoors.
It actually isnt even attached to the furnace many times as it serves no purpose there and simply
continues to the AC unit with the copper lineset that the AC unit feeds.
The remaing 24 volt Thermostat wire goes back to common on transformer to complete the Yellow
24 volt control circuit.
Green or G exits the Thermostat and connects to G on LVTB for the fan relays 24volt coil
and returns to Common to complete the Green 24 volt control circuit.
O is for a Heat pump reversing valves 24 volt solenoid, and return to Common as all 24v circuits must to terminate or complete the circuit.
Some parasitic type Termostats need the 24v power to run, some are battery, some are both.

Nov 01, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

No heat or cool on my payne heat pump


If you can manually push in on the contactor and the fan runs, your not getting 24 volts across the contactor coil.
If the contactor is not energized, your compressor want be running, the contactor controls the fan and compressor.
You need to measure the voltage across the contactor coil and if you don't have 24 volts then you need to either jumper the pressure swiches or measure the voltage across the pressure switches if you read 24 volts then they are open.
If low pressure switch is open you are probably low on refrigerant, if high pressure switch is open it's bad.
If these check out ok then you might check the low voltage wires for loose connections or the wires from unit back to house and under the house to see if there's any breaks or insulation chewed up from lawn mower or animals.

Jan 09, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Fan and compressor on outside unit not working.


If you read 24 volts at the contactor and it does not pull in, the contactor is bad. If you do not read 24 volts at the contactor the problem is with the thermostat, thermostat wire or a defrost board and pressure switches if so equipped.

Aug 09, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

My ac unit does not have power to the thermostat. There is 200 volts going into the transformer and 24 volts going out. There is 24 volts on the back side of a terminal with thermostat wire running to the...


Please exercise due caution in checking voltages in live circuits!

24 volts sourced by the transformer, through the thermostat, then through the contactor (turns on power to compressor/fan) and returns to the transformer, If the thermostat is closed (calling for cool) you will see no voltage across it, but instead the contactor should be energized. Please note, 200 volts seems odd, you should have between 215 and 235. It sounds more like the contactor relay coil may be open. Is the contactor/transformer one piece?

May 15, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

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