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Does not seem to be sufficient cool for a 1600 sq ft manufactured home coming from the Coleman unit installed. Some vents more air, others less air. Unit runs without stopping ever. Can you give us some help? Unit about 7 years old. John

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Hi John, depending on the size, I would need the model number from the outdoor unit if it is a split system, you should have 400 cfm per ton of cooling. If you have a 1600 SQ' home, and a 3 ton unit, 3 x 400 cfm is 1200. It would be to small. There are 12,000 B. T. U.'s of cooling per ton. 2 tons would be 24,000 b t u's. 3 tons would be 36, 000 b.t.u.'s. Also, most contractors put lever dampers in the duct work that can be adjusted. They will put a red flag where the lever is and we can adjust the flow to balance out the house. I don't know where your ducts are, under or above, but with a good light find the crawl space and check it out. Get the model number and call it in to get the tonnage or send it to me and I will tell you. It will have a 024, 030, 036, 042, or, 060 in the number, MODEL number and figure like I told you above, 12,000 per ton. 060 would be a 5 ton. This will let you know if the unit is the right size or not. Please rate me on this and I know you will be kind. Thank you John.
Sincerely,
Shastalaker7
A/C, Heating, & Refrigeration Contractor
PS CFM is cubic feet per Minute.

Posted on Aug 05, 2010

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