Question about Peg Perego John Deere Gator HPX Ride on Toy

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Peg perego gator hpx gear slippage

I've seen this problem posted by others but have not found a solution. The drive gear in one (or both) rear tires seems to be slipping and makes a loud clacking noise when engaged. Right now it's just slipping. But if we don't get it fixed, I'm sure it's only a matter of time before it stops working altogether. The only thing I know to do is contact the manufacturer for a replacement part.

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I had the same problem. but not only the main gear !. . check both of gear boxes (which have metal gears inside filled with oil) mine had broken teeth !!!
And try not to tighten the metal motor gear too much to the plastic gear.

Posted on Aug 06, 2010

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Look carefully at each of the gears. Take them apart and I bet some of the teeth are sheared off. Order new gearboxes should fix the problem. This happened to us.

Posted on Aug 03, 2010

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1 Answer

Peg perago ride on toy only one tire has power


Does both wheels make a grinding sound when you turn them by
hand. If so, then you might have a lose wire. But if it does not make
a noise then the motor is no good. Each tire on the rear of my grandson's gator has a motor . The tires are independent of each
other.

Jul 17, 2014 | Peg Perego John Deere Gator HPX Ride on...

1 Answer

Why does my 4 wheel drive not work all the time?


Elaine,

not work, do tell what makes you think it dont work (a lamp) or tires slipping or dead tires. (by tires mean that and traction)??????????

what mode fails, of the many, and where.???????



first off, we dont know what your tires are touching.

on road, or off road. pavement or ICE or snow.

that matters big time . (you read manual and match MODE to Road)

your lost operators guide explains all that, right?

eg: how and when to use, 4wd, its all there. I promise.

ControlTrac 4-wheel-drive system



here are the mode. which one , gives you problems.



quote ford with comments.



What are the modes, and how do they differ?

(note this is the operational behavior of a 2008 Ford Expedition. Newer and older Expeditions will vary only slightly)



2H 2-wheel-drive with high range gearing (1.00:1) Rear-wheel-drive capability,

2-wheel electronic traction control system is enabled



4A 4-wheel-drive Auto with high range gearing (1.00:1) Full-time all-wheel-drive capability, ((best on pavement or any time)

Electronically adjusted torque split to front & rear wheels, Electronically variable center differential,

Front driveshaft & rear primary driveshaft allowed rotational speed difference,

4-wheel electronic traction control system is enabled



4H 4-wheel-drive with high range gearing (1.00:1) Part-time 4-wheel-drive capability, (not for dry pavement EVER)

Continuous 50/50 torque split to front & rear wheels, Electronically locked center differential,

Front driveshaft & rear primary driveshaft mechanically locked with no rotational speed difference,

4-wheel electronic traction control system is enabled



4L 4-wheel-drive with low range gearing (2.64:1) Part-time 4-wheel-drive capability, (off road usage, mostly)

Continuous 50/50 torque split to front & rear wheels, Electronically locked center differential,

Front driveshaft & rear primary driveshaft mechanically locked with no rotational speed difference,

4-wheel electronic traction control system is enabled, ESC and RSC are disabled



In 4A mode the center differential is electronically-controlled and rear drive wheel bias. The on-board computer monitors for any sign of rear drive wheel slip (loss of traction)

If loss of traction is detected, the center differential is told to send a share of the engine\'s torque to the front drive wheels. It will not let the front driveshaft turn at the same speed as the rear driveshaft.



What about traction management?

1997-2002 model Ford Expeditions offered an optional limited-slip rear differential (LSD). A conventional open rear differential was standard along with the conventional open front differential and the electronic locking center differential.

comment with out LSD, one tire can spin, on say ice.

but the other 3 tires dont, in full time.

Jul 04, 2014 | 2003 Ford Expedition

1 Answer

Jeep grand cherokee quadra drive


Differentials.

The Jeep Quadra Drive systems have a limited slip differential in the transfer case as well as the front and rear axles - which allows you to run all wheel drive on all surfaces. This matters because without limited slip capability your transfer case & axles would break.

Have your transfer case and axles serviced by a dealer, really a real dealer for Chrysler Jeep. These diffs and transfer cases can use unique gear oils that you don\'t want to mix up with regular gear oil.

That howling, clunking, grinding noise is your dog-clutches slipping (as designed) as you go around the corner.



Additional Details below:

So what\'s the Diff?



All differentials are is a way to allow for different wheels to travel different distances on the same vehicle. What-he-say? Yep, when we turn a corner all 4 wheels go a different distance around that corner... oh yeah well everybody knows that. Think about it, your making that hard left turn at your favorite Fast-Food joint; your left front wheel is 2 feet away from the curb, but the back left wheel rubs the curb... why?

As you make that 90 degree turn, your left back wheel travels 4 feet, your left front wheel travels 6 feet, your right rear wheel travels 7 feet, and your right front wheel travels 8 feet.



Ok you say, what\'s the big deal? A couple feet slip here a couple of feet slip there... Well remember your sticky rubber tires on dry asphalt don\'t really give very much and u-joints, axles shafts, and even pinion and ring gear damage can occur. Fortunately for us, Leonardo DaVinci (yeah really) saw this problem coming and designed the Open Differential. There are mini-gears inside your open differential that allow for that slippage, these mini-gears are called spider gears. Problem is when your in snow, ice, mud the spider gears of the open diff allow all your power to go to the wheel with the least traction (and your stuck).

Ok let\'s put another powered axle up front and call it 4x4. Umm no.

A normal 4x4 is not really true four wheel drive. At best it\'s the worst 2 wheels you\'ve got - driving you forward. Until both wheels on the same side are in a ditch, and your stuck.



Well what the heck Leonardo? I want something better than stuck!



The old-time dragster dudes of the 50\'s & 60\'s agreed with you and they welded those little spider gears together for true positraction across both wheels. Ever been close to a big monster truck in a parking lot and heard its tires chirping around the corner? Or an old Jeep crow-hopping it\'s way around a corner - Letting out little tire noises (like "erp" "erp" "erp")?

That\'s because these 4x4\'s have been modified to not have any differential action. None. This is great in a 1/4 mile dragster race or a mountain climbing rally car. A locked front differential can (and most likely will) cause you to crash... not good for daily drivers.



You\'re in luck, the Limited Slip Differential (LSD) has clutches instead of spider gears, which engage as wheel slippage increases. Subaru and Audi are 2 companies that really brought this to market with All Wheel Drive decades ago. Jeep and other SUV/Pickup manufacturers have utilized clutch-based LSD\'s as well. Clutch-based LSD\'s however, have a limited lifespan and can require special gear oils. When Clutch-based LSD\'s fail, they basically become an Open Diff.



Automatic locking differentials were brought to market in the 70\'s & 80\'s by companies like Detroit Locker, and these engage a fully locked set of gears as soon as any slippage occurs. Problem is it can become very difficult to steer, at all. Forget about U-turns, just go around the block. And while your at it, stop and pick up another set of tires because it will feel like you are dragging your outside tires around every corner.



Jeep and Daimler-Chrysler developed another type of LSD that utilizes a small hydraulic pump to engage a set of clutches and gears, which lasts much longer than traditional LSD\'s. It was called a Gerodisc differential, and it worked fairly well. Not as much traction as a full locker, but good LSD performance. The problem was the Gerodisc couldn\'t control itself in the car-washes, and would build-up pressure as the tires slipped over the soapy rollers, and launch the Grand Cherokee across the car wash. Yeah, it was freaky. So freaky that the National Car Wash Association of America (yeah they have an association, who knew?) prohibited all Grand Cherokees. Look it up.



The King Daddy of differentials is the selectable locker. These little gems are very expensive, but you get all the benefits of both the open diff for maneuvering, and lockers for traction only when needed.



So that noise, while it may not spell imminent doom, surely ain\'t good.

Jan 02, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2002 jeep wont stay in 4wheel drive low


Your JEEP is only part time 4WHEEL DRIVE as you can't DRIVE on the STREET with it, its NORMAL and nothing is WRONG.


Part-Time and Full-Time 4x4 systems...

A part-time 4x4 system called Commandtrac is in all Wranglers together with low-end Cherokees and Liberties. A part-time 4x4 system locks the front and rear driveshafts together inside the transfer case so they drive the front and rear axles together in lock step. Because they are locked together, the front and rear tires must rotate at the exact same rpms. However, the front tires must rotate faster than the rear tires during any turn so a part-time system fights that... which makes a part-time system inappropriate on a paved road because the high level of traction on a paved road prevents the tires from slipping which would otherwise allow the front and rear tires to grudgingly rotate at different rpms. Offroad this is not a problem since the poor traction of an offroad trail allows the tires to slip as needed. But when they try to slip/rotate at different rpms on a high-traction surface, the entire drivetrain is stressed which is bad for it. This problem is called "wind-up".

In reality however, the front and rear axles really don't even turn exactly the same RPMs when you're in 4wd so you still get "wind-up" if you drove in 4wd on the street even if you drove in a perfectly straight line. Why? Because 1) you can't drive in a perfectly straight line and 2) the front and rear axle ratios are usually .01 different from each other. Like a 3.73 and 3.74, 4.10/4.11, etc.. Why the .01 ratio difference between the front and rear axles? Because the front and rear axles usually have different ring gear diameters which makes it nearly impossible for the gear manufacturers to economically make the front and rear axle ratios exactly the same. And no, they are not made .01 different on purpose to make the front or rear pull more when in 4wd, that is an old wive's tale.

Finally, a full-time 4x4 system like Selectrac is available on Grand Cherokees, Cherokees and Libertys couples the front and rear axles together, but they are not mechanically locked together like they are with a part-time 4wd system. The front-to-rear axle coupling can be done via either a differential like the Selectrac system uses (just just like what is in the center of an "open" axle) or a fluid (viscous) coupler. The benefit to a full-time 4wd system is that because the front and rear axles are not mechanically locked together, the front and rear tires/axles can rotate at different rpms from each other. This allows a vehicle with a full-time 4wd system to drive in 4wd "full time" on a paved road without problem since there is no 'wind-up' problem to harm the drivetrain. You cannot get a full-time 4x4 system in a Wrangler from the factory.



HOPE THIS HELPS.

Sep 08, 2012 | 2002 Jeep Wrangler

1 Answer

Battery connectors get hot on gator


are both wheels turning in all of the gears?

May 21, 2012 | Peg Perego John Deere Gator HPX Ride on...

4 Answers

Why is it that when i put my truck in four wheel drive it only turns one wheel up front and one in the rear? This is on my Ford F150 4x4 1989


The gears in the axels are open type - meaning they drive the wheel with the least amount of traction, most often right rear and left front wheels. Some of the rear axels were fitted with a limited slip type that would drive both wheels.

Feb 01, 2011 | 1989 Ford F 150

1 Answer

Gear slippage. Horrible sound.


gear box gears are probably sheared off. this happened to ours. Order new gear box--easy to install.

Aug 03, 2010 | Peg Perego John Deere Gator HPX Ride on...

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