Question about Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-135mm Lens

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My Nikon D 80 on the same exposure settings in

At times, my Nikon 80D gives totally black pics, even though the setting,light and subject remain the same.This sometimes happens when taking several shots in the same setting or environment.At other times the flash shoots and the shutter clicks afterwards giving very poor exposure.Grateful for help,thanks a lot.

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You have a shutter problem that can only be fixed by a service technician.

Posted on Aug 03, 2010

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Nixon S8100 fairly new camera, nice pics if the subject doesnt move but horrible pictures if object moves. Very blurry.


If everything in the picture is blurry, you are moving the camera when you press the shutter button. If only the subject is blurry and the background is clear the problem is too slow shutter speed. If this is cause by movement of the camera you must learn to SQUEESE the button while being sure you don't move the camera. It just takes a little practice. If this problem caused by a shutter speed that is too slow, it is remedied by increasing the ISO "film" speed. Even though you have no film, the camera has a "speed" setting that relates to that. The higher ISO value increases the camera's sensitivity to light and thus allows for faster shutter speed. Normally the ISO choices are 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600. Try using 400. The ISO setting is in one of your camera menus. 400 is fast enough to solve your problem in all but very fast movement of either the camera or subject. Using ISO above 400 will cause your pictures to look grainy and not as sharp. Use the highest speed only when absolutely necessary. Slower ISO numbers produce the finest grain and thus the sharpest pictures. It a trade off between ISO and shutter speed because the exposure is a combination of the ISO and shutter speed and lens opening. Each one effects the exposure by half or double.

Apr 16, 2011 | Nikon Cameras

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The S and M modes on the dial..show black images when taking a pic; any idea why?


I'd say you're severely underexposing. The M mode is for manual exposure. This means you're responsible for setting the appropriate shutter speed and aperture. The aperture controls how much light passes through the lens, the shutter speed controls how long that light hits the sensor. The two of them have to be adjusted properly to suit the amount of light hitting the subject. If the lens doesn't admit enough light and/or the shutter is opened for too short an amount of time, not enough light gets to the sensor and you get a black image.

The S mode is for shutter priority. This lets you set the shutter speed and the camera automatically adjusts the lens aperture for correct exposure. However, the lens has a maximum aperture beyond which it cannot open. If the shutter speed is too fast, again not enough light gets through the lens and you get a black image.

Since you didn't specify the model of your Nikon camera, I can't tell you exactly how to adjust the shutter speed and aperture. If you can't find the procedure in your manual, please feel free to reply to this post, specifying the model.

Feb 24, 2011 | Nikon Cameras

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Exposure Compensation (-2.0EV to +2.0EV in 1/3EV increments) whats best for cybershot p71


That depends on the current situation. The exposure compensation merely subtracts or adds exposure to the "best" setting as determined by the camera's meter. The camera works on the assumption that your subject is composed of "middle gray" tones.

For a backlit subject, for example, you might want to add some exposure to bring out details in the subject at the expense of blowing out the highlights in the background. If you're taking a picture of a black cat sitting on black asphalt, you'd probably want to subtract exposure so you don't get a gray cat on a gray background. If you have a white dog in the snow, you'd want to add exposure so you don't get a gray dog on a gray background.

Again, there is no such thing as a "best" setting. There is only a "best" setting for a particular picture-taking situation, and even then the setting depends on your artistic inclinations.

Dec 17, 2010 | Cameras

2 Answers

Nikon f3 hp light meter wont work


I'm interested in this as well. Just installed fresh batteries, light meter says 1/80 in all shutter settings faster than 1/60 (otherwise it shows the correct setting). Since 1/80 is the flash sync speed, it may be that the camera thinks there's a flash attached. But it is not...
Strange thing is that one time (I tried a couple of times today) the light meter worked correctly; it showed other timings and they changed as I turned the aperture ring...

Apr 16, 2010 | Nikon F3HP 35mm SLR Camera

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My nikon d40 does'nt like it when i take i picture with a black backdrop what setting do i need?


If you mean that the subject is overexposed because the camera is fooled into thinking it needs more exposure because of the black background, all you need to do is set your "exposure compensation" a little lower. You'll have to experiment with how much.

Oct 08, 2009 | Nikon D40x Digital Camera

2 Answers

Jewelery pics


Yes and no. It depends on how small the piece is.

Aug 13, 2009 | Nikon N55 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Soligor mirror 500 on Nikon D-80 ????


The D80 is not able to set exposure with non-CPU lenses like your Soligor, so it probably is very far off on the correct exposure. You must operate in Manual mode and choose a shutter speed appropriate for the lighting. Reflex (mirror) lenses have no aperture adjustment, and I'm guessing your Soligor 500mm is probably f/8 like just about every other 500mm reflex. A good starting exposure for a typical sunlit scene would be 4x your ISO setting. For example, at ISO 400 set your shutter speed to 1600.

Mar 08, 2009 | Samyang 500mm f8 Ultra Telephoto Manual...

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Exposure


Is your lens clean? was the subject extensively backlit, more than the rest? Half of photography is finding a location with even, pretty lighting. If lack of experience is your issue, check out this page: http://www.darjanpanic.com/photography/photography-lighting-knowledge-the-key-to-good-photos/
Otherwise... D80s are just... quirky. If it's a serious issue, send it into nikon - it costs all of 10 dollars to do so for a quote. Good luck. :)

Apr 05, 2008 | Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-135mm...

1 Answer

Nikon d50


the flashing means that the exposure is not correct for that area. if that area was the subject, then you might want to adjust the settings to reduce sensitivity in order to view that area correctly. if you spot meter the 'true subject' in the frame, there will often be areas outside that subject that are either brighter or more dimly lit. but exposure will be right for the subject. it can't all be correctly exposed if there is much variation in lighting. fill flashes will provide more light to the subject, thus resulting in a reduction in sensitivity of the resulting settings. (shorter exposure time or smaller aperture or a combination of both) and that will let the brighter areas move closer to 'not washing out' or being over exposed as some people refer to it. in either approach, its not a defect or problem unless it bothers you. the flashing just lets you know that you can modify settings if it matters that the photograph has high levels of contrast beyond what you may want. sometimes the subject is not in the center, and thus not metered for. but the framing is set to include something off to the side. you can reset exposure by adjusting exposure compensation so that while you are reading a darker area than that of the subject, you don't want the camera to use that area for light settings necessarily.
recap: exposure control via exposure compensation or fill flash
mark

Dec 22, 2007 | Nikon D50 Digital Camera

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