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My laptop has a faint light blue shadow appearing to the right of any black to white high contrast image or any plain black text. Is it a heat problem with my video card or is my monitor about to fail?

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Early warning that video is going south. could be video chip or the screen itself. happen with any other card? YOu might consider re installing the video drivers

Posted on Apr 25, 2008

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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The best contrast and brightness settings for a toshiba crt floor model tv,model 50A61


Televisions are unlike other consumer electronics products. Their setup and settings have a tremendous effect on how well they perform. The best TV on the market incorrectly setup will almost always look worse than a mediocre TV setup well.
Ideally, you'll get a setup disc to ensure the correct settings, but regardless, it's important to know what each setting actually does.
To get the ultimate performance out of your TV, a full calibration by an ISF Certified technician is your best option. Even if you go that route, it's good to know what the calibrator is adjusting. So here's a quick look at the basic settings every TV has, and what they do.
Please keep in mind, this is only a general guide in what each setting does, and rough idea how to set it. Correctly setting up a television is a completely different article.
Where to start
Nearly all modern TVs have picture modes. These are labeled things like Standard, Cinema, Vivid, and so on. Cinema or Movie is often the most accurate setting, with all the controls set to offer an image close to what a director intended them to look like. Most people aren't used to an accurate image like this, and to them the TV may appear reddish, soft, and possibly dim. Technically, it isn't. Other picture modes like Vivid or Dynamic are programmed to "pop" on a store sales floor with an overenhanced, blue image. Because most people don't change any of their TV's settings, this has resulted in most people thinking a TV should look blue.
The choice is yours, of course, but we here prefer an accurate image and suggest you at least try it for a few days. Once you get used to it, you'll never go back. Check out What's the best picture mode? for more info.
Regardless, all TVs need tweaking to look their best. Here's what the main controls do.
Backlight
Only LCDs have this control (though not all of them). This is a direct control of how bright the image is. Setting this lower will reduce eyestrain, and save a little on electricity. Before you adjust Contrast to make the image brighter, try here first. Check out LED LCD backlights explained for more on this.
Some plasmas have a control that drives the pixels harder, which in some ways acts similar to a backlight control. Samsung's name for this on their plasmas is Cell Light.
Contrast
Sometimes labeled "Picture." This control makes the image brighter...up to a point. Every television has a maximum light output. Once you reach this point, increasing the Contrast control further actually degrades the image. Correctly set, you would see a fluffy cloud in a bright sky. Set too high, you'd see a blotch of white instead. As mentioned above, try setting the overall light output of an LCD with the Backlight control first (if available). Then adjust the Contrast.
Brightness
This controls how dark the dark areas of the image are, again, to a point. Every TV has a minimum light output. Once you reach this point, decreasing the Brightness control starts removing "shadow detail." Correctly set, you'd see all the detail in a black leather jacket at night. Set too low, and it would be a black area on a black area, probably with a head sticking out of it. For more information on how the contrast, brightness and backlight settings interact, check out my article on contrast ratio.
Color
Can be thought of as color saturation. Setting this too high will make everything look cartoony. Setting it too low will make for an expensive black-and-white HDTV.
Tint
Rarely will you need to adjust tint, a vestigial control left over from the CRT "tube" TV days. It gives a green or magenta shade to the image.

Jun 23, 2016 | Toshiba Televison & Video

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5 More Black & White Photography Tips


<b>Black & white </b>photography is one of the most interesting and inspiring aspects of this art form we call our hobby and passion. It's raw & refined, natural and unusual, bold and subtle, mysterious and open, emotional and indifferent, simple and complex, black & white & everything in between. The monochrome image has been practicing photography since the beginning, but what began as the only way to capture images is turned into something much deeper.<br /> 1. PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE An experienced black & white photographer can see the world without color. They've trained their mind to pick up contrast and tone while blocking the distraction of colors. This isn't a skill that you can pick up in a short amount of time; it's something that comes naturally in time. I can't say that I'm gifted enough to have monochrome vision, but I have been able to notice certain scenes and subjects that would lend themselves to black & white.<br /><br /> One way to help train your brain is to make a conscious effort - in other words, practice. Trevor carpenter gave us the perfect example when he started his October Challenge. Basically, he decided to limit his photography to black & white for an entire month. This gave him a chance to experiment with the medium and learn from his own work, and in his project recap he states "I have found, especially in recent days, that as I'm shooting and conceiving a shot, I see the potential impact of the composition in black & white."<br /> Zig Zag<span></span><br /><br /> 2. FOCUS ON CONTRAST Black & white photography is about the black, the white, and all the tones in between. The human eye is built to pick up two things: light intensity and color. When you remove the color, your eyes become more sensitive to the light intensity. We naturally pick out areas of contrast - it's how we distinguish one thing from another. As a black & white photographer, your main objective is to make your point with shades of gray. Use contrast to show your onlookers what's important and what's not. Seek out scenes that naturally show signs of high contrast, and your black & white photos will be more compelling right from the start.<br />When post-processing a black & white image, the use of Photoshop techniques like levels, curves, and layer blends give you a wide variety of output options. In addition to these things, burning and dodging are highly effective methods of improving contrast. They work so well because they allow you to focus the edit on a localized portion of the image without affecting the surrounding areas<br /> 3. FOCUS ON TEXTURE Texture is really just a form of contrast, but it is perceived quite differently. If you think about it, texture is the regular or irregular pattern of shadows and highlights at various intensities. Black & white photos really lend themselves to texture because color generally add another layer of complexity, thus masking most subtle textures. Look for areas of interesting texture that can be photographed by zeroing in on specific surfaces and examining them for signs of patterned contrast.<br /><br /> The choices you make in post-processing can really make a difference in the texture too. During the black & white conversion, you can usually pull texture out of otherwise smooth surfaces based on your choice of conversion methods. In digital photos, blues and reds generally contain more noise than greens, so tools like the channel mixer and the black & white adjustment layer in Photoshop can really accentuate those embedded textures.<br /><br /> 4. CAPTURE IN COLOR This is mainly aimed at digital photographers... If your camera gives you the option of shooting in color or black & white, NEVER shoot in black & white. The camera is really capturing color, then converting to black & white. Photo editing software can do a much better job at the conversion, and you'll have more flexibility on the output of the final image. It's really amazing how different a photo can look solely based on the post-processing, so it's best not to limit yourself before the photo even makes it out of the camera<br /><br /> The one exception to this rule is if you wanted to use the black & white capture to give you a preview of what the scene might look like as a monochrome image. It may help you identify good black & white scenes more immediately, but once you find your shot switch back over to color capture and shoot it again.<br /> Under the Weather<br /><br /> 5. USE COLOR FILTERS Black & white film photographers make use of color filters to change the captured tones in their photographs. Ever see those monochrome images with dark skies and puffy white clouds? That's not natural; it requires the use of color filtering to produce the desired effect.<br /><br /> Using an actual color filter with a digital camera is perfectly acceptable and it has its merits, but it's not completely necessary. Software like Photoshop has the ability to apply non-destructive color filters. It also has the ability to produce the same results as a color filter during the black & white conversion. For those of you using Photoshop CS3, you'll see that the black & white adjustment dialog has several preset filters that can be applied and modified to suit the photo.<br /><br />

on Oct 28, 2010 | Cameras

1 Answer

Shadows/ ghost images...


i'm also had the same problem and don't know how to solve it. anyone can help?

Apr 03, 2012 | Wacom Cintiq 21UX

1 Answer

How to change the 'Contrast' and 'Brightness' on the monitor screen


Bootup your computer and display your Windows Desktop. Make sure yourmonitor stays on for at least half an hour before you begin, so that itis properly warmed up.


Seta pure black image on the monitor so you can adjust the brightness. Toget a pure black image, do the following: Choose Start, then ControlPanel, then Display. This will open the Display Properties dialog box.Click the down arrow next to the representation of the desktop color inthe Color field. Choose black from the color palette, then click OK.


Maximizethe Brightness control on your monitor, then slowly reduce it until theblack of the image perfectly matches the black at the edge of thephysical screen. This puts the brightness at the proper setting.


Open a screen with a plain white background soyou can adjust the contrast. One of the best ways to do this is to open aword-processing document without any text in it. Gradually reduce the contrastsetting of your monitor until the white area of the screen begins to lookslightly gray or off-white. Then gradually increase the contrast until thewhite area on your monitor is pure white. This will give you the proper whitebalance. Now you've got your monitor ready for peak performance.

Hope this may help you solve your problem.























Nov 12, 2010 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

In the past few day i've noticed the picture is


BRIGHTNESS. Your owner's manual probably says that the brightness setting is used to control "brightness" or "picture intensity" or something other fuzzy non-descript term. The truth is that brightness is used to set the BLACK level in the picture.
On most TVs and projectors in use today, brightness is set too high. That's because people think "a bright picture is good, so I will set it as bright as I can get." Well, that's nice in theory, but entirely wrong in practice. Setting the brightness level too high makes a black tuxedo look gray rather than black. It muddies up the shadow areas, and reduces the overall snap and crispness that the picture would have if properly calibrated.
To find the right setting for brightness, go to the image in your movie that has textured blacks and hopefully some shadow/low light areas in which there is detail. Then freeze on that frame. As you move the brightness control down, the intensity of the blacks will increase, and shadows will get darker. As you move the control all the way to zero, you will (hopefully) see that the low light shadow areas will also go to solid black and lose their detail.
The optimum setting for brightness is achieved at just the point where true black objects appear as black as your system will make them while retaining as much visible detail in the shadow areas. Above this point the blacks appear to go grayer. Below this point you lose detail in the shadows. On many video systems, this optimum point is toward the lower end of the brightness scale. But find the point that looks correct to you regardless of where it is on the scale.
CONTRAST. The contrast control is similarly confusing. It is also often set too high on the theory that contrast is good, and therefore we might as well get the most we can out of our set by turning it all the way up. In fact, the contrast setting is used to control the intensity of the brightest highlights in the picture, so it is (oddly enough) the opposite of brightness control.
First, find your test scene in which you find textured whites in bright light, and freeze that frame. You are looking for the brightest elements in the picture in which you want to retain visible detail.
Let's assume you have a whitewashed fence in sunlight. If you start with the contrast set low, the fence will appear light gray rather than white. As you move the contrast control up, the fence will get whiter. Eventually details in the texture of the fence will begin to disappear.
If you continue to push contrast past the optimum point, the wood-grain texture of the fence will go solid white and all visible detail will be obliterated. Push contrast up even a little further, and our fenceposts might actually appear to expand very slightly due to a glow around the edges. This phenomenon, called "blooming" is a definite sign that your contrast setting is overcooking the image (and maybe your picture tube as well—don't ever leave the contrast control set this high!!!)
Find the point at which whites look white while retaining as much texture detail as possible. This is your optimum contrast setting. On most video systems, this setting is toward the higher end of the scale, but it can be anywhere. Find the point that looks correct to you. (By the way, unlike TV's, digital projectors will not bloom)
Now…note the following: brightness and contrast can be to some degree interactive. Your new contrast setting may have affected your brightness. So return to the brightness scene and verify that your blacks are still black, and you still have maximum detail in the shadows. Adjust it if necessary, then return and adjust the contrast setting once again if necessary. (You can see that this is much easier if the black and white elements you are testing all appear in the same image!)
COLOR. The color control on your set determines the level of color intensity in the image. One of the most common errors people make in calibrating their video systems is overdriving the color. That's what makes Larry King look reddish-orange on the TV at the gym. Overdriving color is common because once again, people naturally think, "I want to get as much color as I can out of this color TV, so I will crank it up some to make sure I get the most out of it!" No. Bad mistake.
If you move the color setting down to zero you will notice that your picture will turn into a black and white image. The optimum setting for color is achieved by increasing the setting just to the point where colors look natural and not a bit more! Flesh tones should look natural and without any hint of an unnatural glow. Grass should look naturally green rather than screaming spray-paint green.
When adjusting color, make sure that your test image has relatively unsaturated colors. Flesh tones or natural landscapes are ideal. It is impossible to set color properly if you are using a brilliant red Ferrari as your test subject.
On the large majority of video systems, the optimum setting for color is somewhere near the middle of the scale. However, trust your eyes for the optimum setting and think "what looks like the most natural, accurate reproduction of reality?" Any overdriving of color will make the image look artificial.
TINT or HUE. The tint control adjusts color balance rather than color intensity. It is an easy control to set properly, but for some reason many people don't get it right. When flesh tones look either too green or too magenta, a phenomenon you see with amazing frequency, it is because the tint control is not set properly.
Find a human face and freeze-frame it. (In choosing your test subject, note that lighter skin tones will show errors in tint more readily than darker skin tones). As you move the tint control to one end of the spectrum, the face turns green; as you move it to the other extreme, the face turns magenta (red+blue).
The correct setting for tint is the point near the middle of the scale at which you can detect no hint of either green or magenta. It is the most neutral point between the two extremes. The flesh tone looks the most natural at this point.
SHARPNESS or DETAIL. The final setting is sharpness or detail. Now, pray tell, who in their right mind wouldn't want the sharpest, most detailed picture they could get? And since there is a control that lets you turn it up, why not turn it up? That's what many folks do, and of course it's exactly the wrong thing to do.
The sharpness control adds processed information to the picture that is NOT part of the original video signal. It adds artificially highlighted edges, and makes the picture look less natural than it otherwise would. This is most evident along the continuous edge of a dark object against a middle-toned background. When sharpness is overdriven the dark edge will be outlined by a white ringing effect that increases contrast just along the edge of your dark object. That edge "highlighting" effect is created by the sharpness control. It is an artificial manipulation of the image. It wasn't in the original scene, and it shouldn't be on your screen either.
On most televisions, the optimum setting for sharpness is zero. On many digital projectors, the optimum setting is either in the low or middle part of the scale. Picture tube televisions and digital projectors behave differently in this regard; on a digital projector it is often possible to fuzz the image by setting sharpness too low.
Now look at your picture with the sharpness turned down or off depending on what works best on your system. You will see a smoother, more natural image. It might take some getting used to, since you may be accustomed to viewing video with all the artificial edge enhancements that create the illusion of added sharpness.
However, when the interference and noise from the artificial sharpness enhancer is removed, you are seeing the most genuine reproduction of the video signal that your projector or TV is capable of. And if you view it for a while, you will gain an appreciation for just how smooth, natural, and satisfying the picture can really look.

Dec 12, 2009 | Sony Grand WEGA KDF-55XS955 55" Rear...

1 Answer

Dell 5110cn Printer Printing Blue Shadows


I did the following and it has stopped printing "shadows". I don't know if it was one solution or the other (or both) that worked.

1.On the face of the printer press the "Menu" button>Admin Menu>Maintrnance>Color Reg Adj>
Auto Correct>Yes
2. "Menu" button>Admin Menu>Maintrnance>Clean Developer>(Pick problem color)>Yes.

Hope it helps

Aug 16, 2008 | Dell 5110cn Laser Printer

2 Answers

Shadowing


GOOD DAY ND GOOD LUCK;

TRY THIS, IT WILL CORRECT CONCERN:

50V500 ONLY
GHOST: May be described as "Out of Convergence" but ghost is still attached to main image.
CONDITION:
A "ghost image" appearing to the left or right of images in the picture. Can be varying shades of a primary color (red, green, or blue) as well as gray. Can easily be seen in the 4 x 3 mode, at the edges of the picture.
CORRECTION:

To correct the problem, please do as follows:
  1. Access I2C Menu. (See page 57 of the Service Manual).
  1. To enter the I2C Service Menu, with power off, (on the front control panel) press and hold the INPUT button. Then press the POWER button for two seconds. The following Service Menu will appear.
03b_ghost_image01.gif Figure 1
  1. BEFORE CONTINUING: CONFIRM THAT THE R, G and B DRIVE ARE SET AT 40.
  • Be sure to press SELECT after each change to SAVE the new Data.


  1. Using the Remote Control joy stick, scroll down to next page (see Figure 2) until LCD ADJUST is highlighted.
03b_ghost_image02.gif Figure 2
  1. Move the joy stick to the right to cursor right once. The next page will appear with the word GHOST highlighted.
  2. Cursor right again, and a white screen will appear with a BLACK SQUARE in the center, as in Figure 3. You will see LCD ADJUST, followed by “SHP” and a number (value).
03b_ghost_image03.gif
Figure 3

  1. If the unit is out of adjustment, you will see a gray ghost on either side of the black square. Move the joystick to the right or to the left until the ghost disappears. The number values will change up or down.
    • If the ghost adjustment is off with a lower value, there will be a ghost to the left of the square.
    • If the ghost adjustment is off with a higher value, there will be a ghost to the right of the square.
  2. Once you get the square to look good without ghosts, press "SELECT" to save any data values that have been changed.
  3. Press the "EXIT" button three times to return to normal picture.
  4. Adjustment is completed
  5. I HOPE THIS WAS HELPFUL, big IRISH.




Jul 26, 2008 | Hitachi 50V500 50 in. HD-Ready LCD...

1 Answer

HX-P4241W appears yellow. Left and Right of screen are yellow


Yellow is the lack of blue. It can happen when you are running your contrast - which is your overall light level - too high.

Try turning down your contrast. On CRT tech, contrast should always be run at half what the factory allows as full, on the user controls. Full up is what calibrators call Torch Mode, and is NOT the way to get performance to be in the linear operating range of CRT tech.

If your sides are more yellow than your middle, your set may need lenstriping. Mild yellow on the sides is not uncommon, and usually not noticed. But heavy yellow on the sides would indicate that the blue image needs work on white field uniformity.

Yellow is the lack of blue, in CRT tech.


Mr Bob

Feb 02, 2008 | Samsung HC-P4241W 42" Rear Projection...

2 Answers

Green shadows surrounding bright whites


finally a consumer that gives us plenty of info :)
sounds like an overdriven green tube, the only thing you can try is to find the G2/Focus block assembly, either behind front speaker grill or remove back of set and look for a black box approximately 5"X5" , this box will have 6 philips type adjustment screws(plastic) 3 are for focus, do NOT adjust these,
the other 3 are marked "screen" the center screen adjustment screw is for green, turn it VERY slowly counterclockwise while the set is running and pray that your problem dis-appears, be advised that this is a HIGH VOLTAGE device so one hand in your back pocket the other hand turns the screwdriver, if the problem does not go away you have a poor green tube, good luck, sorry I can`t give you the exact location of the G2/Focus block, manufacturers move them to different places every year.

Nov 29, 2007 | Mitsubishi WS-55809 55" Rear Projection...

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