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A wire of length 12 1/2 m cut into 10 pieces of equal. Find the length of each piece ?

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12.5 meters = 41.01049868766404 feet = 492.1259842519685 inches

492.1259842519685 / 10 = 49.21259842519685 inches per section

There are 2.54 cm in an inch, therefore:

49.21259842519685 x 2.54 =

125cm for each piece?



Posted on Aug 01, 2010

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