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There does not seem to be any electricity to the starter. The battery is charged. There is 6 v. current to one side of the solenoid, but I cannot get any current to the other side, even by using a screwdriver to short across the posts. It is a riding mower model DRM500.

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Check/ replace in line fuse. Also, check to see if other saefty switches are working properly

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1993 kawasaki ninja 600R (zx600-C6)


A (rapid) buzzing/clicking noise sound when trying to turn over an engine is caused by a weak or low voltage/amperage flow from the battery to the starter solenoid. There's just enough voltage to get to the solenoid but not enough to spin the starter; so what you are hearing are the rapid pulses of the solenoids contacts opening and closing.
If you hear a ticking sound, this condition is caused when the starter connection plate has shorted and will not allow the electrical current flow to continue through to the starter motor itself; OR the starter brushes have failed and are not allowing the electrical current flow through to the starter armature.
In order to start diagnosing the electrical system, you must have a fully charged battery (12.6Vdc) and one that can hold its charge.
CAUTION / WARNING: Whenever you are working on a battery, ALWAYS wear eye protection and gloves; and make sure there are no flammables (combustibles) nearby.
If the battery, when disconnected (removed) from the M/C's chassis maintains and holds its charge, you know the battery is not the source of the problem. However, if after you hook up the wire leads to the battery and the power from the battery is discharged- you'll need to find the source of what's draining the battery. To measure current draw; make sure everything is turned OFF. Hook-up your multimeter in series to the positive battery post and the positive lead wire; using the amperage scale on the meter, take a reading, it should be zero or an extremely low milli-amp reading.
In absence of any parasitic amperage draw you need to check the solenoid ground for any corrosion; as a matter of fact, check the entire battery harnesses for corrosion and loose connections.
You can also remove the starter and test the solenoid, starter motor, and over-ride clutch (Bendix arm), too.
If everything passes, then you will have to troubleshoot your motorcycle's charging system. Hope this helps- keep me and this forum posted wit any updates; best wishes.

Mar 07, 2014 | Motorcycles

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Won't start turn the key and it clicks. Replaced battery, air filter fine, fuel filter appears clear.


1. Check the battery terminals and leads are clean and the connections are tight.
2. Make sure the battery is fully charged. (Note that some tractor batteries require filling with acid and then charging before first use).
3. Check the starter solenoid, this is the electronic switch which allows heavy current to the starter motor. Check all the connections are clean and tight. Using a voltmeter check it works OK.
4. Finally check the starter motor electrical connections.
5. if everything else is fine it's probably the starter motor.
6. You can also check the starter has not jammed, either by turning the engine or by removing and replacing the starter.
Good luck

Sep 15, 2013 | Husqvarna Garden

1 Answer

Won't crank. battery is good i had it checked. the selenoid clicks


The solenoid (note the spelling) is an electromagnetically operated, high current switch. It takes about ¼ amp to operate the solenoid, so that is the current that goes through the ignition and starter switches.

That ¼A pulls on a shaft which has a thick copper disc attached to its end. When the shaft is pulled into the electromagnet of the solenoid, that disc is pulled in with it, and the disc straddles the heads of two bolts, one of which is connected to the (+) side of the battery, the other to the wire to the starter. If the disc is pitted from arcing, and the bolt heads it is to touch are also, it will fail to make electrical contact, and the starter gets no power. The solenoid clicks, but the starter does nothing.

Use a volt meter to ensure that (+) is getting to the battery side of the solenoid. If not, you have found your problem.

If it does, put the (+) probe on the starter side of the solenoid, and hit the switch. If (+) shows up there, the solenoid is working but the wire to the starter, or the starter itself is not working.

Jun 27, 2010 | 1997 kawasaki VN 800 A Vulcan

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When i turn the key it clicks.


1st, have your battery check to make sure it is fully charged.

Next, check the cable connections on the battery to ensure the connections are clean and securely tightened.

If everything is okay, then you most likely have a bad starter solenoid (relay).

A starter solenoid (or starter relay) is the part of an automobile which relays a large electric current to the starter motor, which in turn sets the engine in motion. In many vehicles the solenoid also engages the starter pinion with the ring gear of the engine.

If a starter solenoid receives insufficient power from the battery, it will fail to start the motor, and may produce a rapid clicking or clacking sound. The lack of power can be caused by a low or dead battery, by corroded or loose connections in the battery cable, or by a damaged positive (red) cable from the battery. Any of these problems will result in some, but not enough, power being sent to the solenoid, which means that the solenoid will simply make a clicking sound, rather than setting the starter motor in motion.

To reduce the likelihood of starter solenoid failure, the battery connections should be cleaned and tightened at every oil change. Starter solenoid problems can be diagnosed by a mechanic at a service center by a test of the car's starting, charging and battery systems.

Jan 24, 2010 | 1988 Lincoln Continental

3 Answers

Vehicle will click but not start, tried juming still clicks , only 10000 original milesany suggestions


Assuming your battery is properly charged and has a good connection, it's your starter solenoid (relay) that has failed.

The starter solenoid receives a large electric current from the car battery and a small electric current from the ignition switch. When the ignition switch is turned on, a small electric current is sent to the starter solenoid. This causes the starter solenoid to close a pair of heavy contacts, thus relaying a large electric current to the starter motor, which in turn sets the engine in motion.

If a starter solenoid receives insufficient power from the battery, it will fail to start the motor, and may produce a rapid clicking or clacking sound. The lack of power can be caused by a low or dead battery, by corroded or loose connections in the battery cable, or by a damaged positive (red) cable from the battery. Any of these problems will result in some, but not enough, power being sent to the solenoid, which means that the solenoid will simply make a clicking sound, rather than setting the starter motor in motion.

If these items are all okay, it is likely you need to replace the solenoid.

Jan 10, 2010 | 2004 Ford Econoline

2 Answers

2001 mustang gt,all access. work fully charged


I would suspect the starter solenoid has failed.

A starter solenoid (or starter relay) is the part of an automobile which relays a large electric current to the starter motor, which in turn sets the engine in motion. In many vehicles the solenoid also engages the starter pinion with the ring gear of the engine.

The starter solenoid receives a large electric current from the car battery and a small electric current from the ignition switch. When the ignition switch is turned on, a small electric current is sent to the starter solenoid. This causes the starter solenoid to close a pair of heavy contacts, thus relaying a large electric current to the starter motor, which in turn sets the engine in motion. The starter motor is an electric motor that initiates piston motion in a car's internal combustion engine before it can power itself.

Nov 27, 2009 | 2001 Ford Mustang

1 Answer

I have a starting problem problem with my 2006 dodge durango. this problem does not happen at all attempts to start but when it happens i get a clicking sound and have toget the truck boost started. i had...


It sounds like your starter solenoid (relay) is failing. The clicking is a classic symptom. It's time to have it replaced.

A starter solenoid (or starter relay) is the part of an automobile which relays a large electric current to the starter motor, which in turn sets the engine in motion .In many vehicles the solenoid also engages the starter pinion with the ring gear of the engine.

The starter solenoid receives a large electric current from the car battery and a small electric current from the ignition switch. When the ignition switch is turned on, a small electric current is sent to the starter solenoid. This causes the starter solenoid to close a pair of heavy contacts, thus relaying a large electric current to the starter motor, which in turn sets the engine in motion. The starter motor is an electric motor that initiates piston motion in a car's internal combustion engine before it can power itself.

Oct 27, 2009 | 2005 Dodge Durango

2 Answers

Loud clicking sound when starting, then nothing, but the car will start. Will not start first thing in am, but after some coaxing it will


the starter motor or its engagement solenoid may be faulty. If the carbon brushes are worn inside the starter then it may click and not turn or turn slowly.

It really needs replaced or reconditioned at an auto electrical shop, and make sure the battery can supply its rated current (this can be tested at most tyre depots) as the starter requires some 300 to 400 amps to crank a cold engine, and a poor battery can seem ok during normal running but only supply low current when starting, causing erratic starter motor operation.

Also check the battery terminals, starter terminals, and earth cables are tight and clean.


Oct 23, 2009 | 1990 Toyota Camry

2 Answers

Car will not start no clicking sound 1993 mazda 626


Nothing is more aggravating than walking out to your car Monday morning and finding it won't start. Instead, all you hear is a click noise when turn the ignition key. What's the problem?
If you are unfamiliar with how a car works, you might immediately assume the clicking noise means the engine is dead. It is obvious that power is being turned on, so the lack of even a vibration or **** would indicate the engine is frozen up, right? Fortunately, the answer is no. Instead, you have an equally aggravating problem somewhere in your starter assembly, but the good news is it will cost a lot less to fix.
There could be a myriad of problems when you hear a clicking noise when starting a car. The first step is to start with the easy things. Check to see if your battery has a charge. Next, check the battery cables to make sure the hookups are not corroded. Corrosion can put a damper of the flow of electrical current and can be the entire problem.
If everything looks okay, the problem may be the solenoid. The what?! The solenoid is essentially a switch that turns the starter on and off. When your car is just sitting off in the driveway, the solenoid is receiving a current from the battery, but it does not pass it on to the starter. When you flip the ignition, a small current signals the solenoid to let the current through to the starter. The starter then turns over. When you have a solenoid that is going bad, the switch can get tweaked and not let the current through correctly. Since the electrical current isn't enough to fire up the starter, the engine doesn't fire. In some cars, it just makes a clicking noise.
Assuming your solenoid is okay, the problem is most likely going to be your starter. The starter takes a lot of strain when it turns over the car. Sooner or later, it is going to have problems. The starter is usually very sensitive to human emotions. If it senses you need to get somewhere in a hurry, it will usually choose that moment to go bad!
Is there some easy way to tell what the problem is? Well, easy is a relative term, but you can do a bypass test. The idea is to bypass the solenoid with the electrical current from the battery. If the starter terms normally, the solenoid is the problem. If it doesn't, the starter is the problem.

Jul 15, 2009 | 1993 Mazda 626

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