Question about Kenmore 63942 Dryer

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Excessive lint coming out of the dryer vent

I have excessive lint coming out of the dryer vent.
This is something that has increassed in the past few years.
When I first put this dryer into service there was next to no lint on my patio, now it's a virtual cotton field.
any ideas would be helpful.
Thanks

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Check your filter for tears,rips anything that will let the lint through
Also you might have changed the filter for one that does nt fit
Clean the filter with dishwashing soap and brush at least once a week.
Be sure and clean the filter after a couple loads.
Replace with a new filter.if all else fails.
Leo Ponder
imufo2@sbcglobal.net

Posted on Jul 30, 2010

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We have a combo dryer and washer. Washer is A2444330KH. Leaves lint on cotton shirts, have cleaned the filter no help. Any ideas? David


Dryer lint not only presents a problem by cluttering up your clothes with white specks, but it can also lead to a dryer fire. While it is impossible to completely eliminate dryer lint, you can take action to drastically reduce lint and the potential problems that come along with excess dryer lint. If your clothes take more than one cycle to dry, you see no lint on the lint screen, the clothes are very hot after drying or you find excess lint on the clothes after drying, you probably have a problem with accumulation of dryer lint in the dryer vent.
Use a dryer vent cleaning brush and clean the dryer vent, or hire a professional to clean the exhaust vent behind your dryer. If your dryer vent is clogged, it will create excess dust in the dryer and on the clothes. The excess lint can eventually catch on fire given the heat load of the dryer.

Dec 05, 2010 | Maytag Washing Machines

Tip

Clean Your Dryer Vent to Prevent Fires


Most people have no idea how much lint gets past your dryer's lint trap. The amount is substantial. Over Time your dryer vent pipe becomes coated with dryer lint. If your dryer vent hasn't been cleaned in over a year, you may have a potential fire hazard on your hands. Once the vent becomes restricted your dryer will take longer to dry a load. Lack of airflow will cause your dryer to over heat. If your dryer vent is over eight feet long, your dryer vent should be cleaned annually. Some of the early warning signs of lint blockage include:

  • Is the top of your dryer hot to the touch?
  • Does your dryer take over 50 minutes to dry a load?
  • Do you ever experience a moldy smell on your clothing?
  • Is dryer lint gathering on the inside of the dryer door?
  • Does it seem like your clothes have extra lint on them?
  • Is your house dusty? Dryer lint is almost microscopic and goes everywhere.

Most dryer vents have a flap or a screen located at the exit. This must be cleaned on aregular basis. Where your dryer vent exit's the building is usually the first place dryer lint will gather. It is very important when you have your vent cleaned they address the exit.
Dryer vents come in all different shapes and sizes. The dryer vent itself refers to the exhaust pipe inside the wall. This pipe should be a 4" steel pipe that exits right outside or some times up through the rooftop. Some builder's occasionally use the more rectangular gutter piping, or the flexible metal piping. Both of these can be inefficient. If your home has a foil accordion type material inside your wall, this needs to be replaced immediately. This material is actually flammable, if you ever had a dryer fire it would have no chance of staying contained.

A dryer vent that exits on to a tile roof can pose another potential airflow restriction. Much of the time builders use the same gooseneck type exit as on a standard shingle roof. Unfortunately these vents aren't long enough, and tend to vent right on the tile with very little space. The fix for this problem is to fabricate an extension that raises the vent at least four inches above the tile.
Another common problem is a crushed transition tube. The transition tube is the pipe that connects the dryer to the wall vent. Most of the time delivery people use the foil type transitions because of ease of installation. Unfortunately this material can easily become crushed or restricted. This type of material is actually paper and can ignite. Unlike the all metal venting material that the dryer manufacturers recommend this material is a real fire hazard. (see your owner's manual or the labels on back of the dryer.)
Unfortunately a blocked dryer vent can break your dryer. The two main parts that break, are the element and the thermostat. The excessive heat produced by a blocked vent is a repair waiting to happen. Many of the new high efficiency dryers have warning lights that tell you when your vent needs cleaning. Some of these dryers even lower the temp on their own to keep from overheating.
The best way to test your dryer vent's efficiency is to disconnect the tube from the wall and dry a load of clothes. If your clothes get dry in a reasonable time it's your dryer vent. Over 15,000 dryer related fires occur every year. Most of these fires could have been prevented, with an annual vent cleaning. Don't become a statistic get your dryer vent professionally cleaned today.

on Jun 07, 2011 | Dryers

1 Answer

I have a problem with dryer not putting enough heat out to dry my clothes.The model #ler4634jq0.The Serial# ml3372706


this may be the result of a clogged vent hose ,Go outside and check the outside dryer vent they sometimes clog up with lint and as a result send false info to the sensor inside the dryer, make sure you clear any excess lint from here, and then do same at the back of dryer where flex hose comes from rear of dryer up into wall then turn on dryer and feel at rear outside vent and see if you can feel the hot air moving more rapidly if so this should resolve your problem

Nov 07, 2010 | Whirlpool LER4634J Electric Dryer

1 Answer

Dryers I have a Maytag electric Dryer, that...


you may have one of ur overheat sensors going out that wont let the elements heat uplike they should they are behind the back cover they are round and very inexpensive u can take the wires off put new one in or u may have a bad element ake the wires off and check continuity thru the element itsself if all that is good take dryer vent off and run with it off 1 load and seee if this cures the problem if it does u had the hose kinked or u have a restriction of lint in the dryer vent going outside hope this helps

Feb 25, 2010 | Maytag Neptune MDE6700A Electric Dryer

1 Answer

It is not drying very well even on the very dry setting, why?


This may sound silly, but have you cleaned the dryer vent pipe from the dryer to the outside of your house? If that vent pipe is plugged, or partially plugged, your dryer will not dry properly. When I have had this problem in the past, the first thing I do is take the dryer out of the house and blow it out with a leaf blower. I put the leaf blower nozzle in the vent trap area, pack a towel around the blower nozzle, turn it on high and watch the lint fly. This ensure the dryer is cleaned out of any excess lint. Next, I take my leaf blower into the house, put the nozzle in the vent pipe (packing a towel around it also) and turn it on high and blow all the lint out of vent. I would caution you to check your piping the make sure all the vent pipe sections are secure. (The first time I blew out my vent pipe I had lint all over my basement due to poor connections in the tin piping. I promptly took aluminized duct tape and covered all of the seams.) My dryer always drys so much better after doing this simple procedure.

Feb 19, 2010 | Bosch Dryers

1 Answer

Too much lint is getting past the lint trap. How


if the filter isn't damaged then this is normal,you should take off the bottom panel and use a shop vac to blow out all the lint inside the dryer especially the motorand blow it forward and vac it up so you don't have to pull the drum to clean it,then remove the lint filter and take off the duct that the filter slides into,now go outside and make sure nothing is blocking the flapper like an animal cage that comes with some of the outside vents,if it's clear go inside and remove the vent line,if it's a long run from the dryer to the outside blow it out with a leaf blower,you should do this once a year and your clothes will always dry on time and your motor and other parts will last longer,when the lint builds up the dryer runs hotter and longer and that's what damages the dryer

Feb 06, 2010 | Kenmore Elite HE4 Electric Dryer

1 Answer

Our problem is with how much dryer lint does not get caught in the lint filter. too much gets past it and plugs up our dryer vent - therefore it takes way too many cycles to dry a load, driving up our...


It may be that the lint catch (Peice the filter goes in) may need to be cleaned.
Unplug and unhook your dryer.
Remove the back panel usually has 1/4 in screws.
Once you have it removed, on the left you will see the lint trap, that can be removed by the 4 1/4 screws around it and the 2 philips screws on top of the dryer.
Once loose you can clean it with a wet dry vac or like me and simply wash it out with a hose, if you chose this method then make sure it is completely dry before putting back.
If you have a wet vac or hose on a vacuum then remove any excess dust you find, especially the area where the vent hooks up to the dryer.
Good Luck!

Nov 05, 2009 | Kenmore Dryers

1 Answer

Dryer is not drying. Lint is not collecting on


There is no lint screen that catches ALL the dryer lint. Some lint will always get exhausted through the dryer vent exhaust ducting along with the moisture from your clothing as it dries. If the exhaust vent remains unobstructed, all the air and lint will be blown out the end of the dryer vent exhaust.

However, if the air meets any resistance from kinks, excessive bends, or sags, moisture will build up inside the dryer vent exhaust causing the lint to stick to the interior walls of the vent hose. Over time this lint builds up and forms a clog. With a clog comes condensation and longer dry times. The dryer will continue to run inefficiently and cause the heating circuits to work harder and overheat. This will eventually lead to a failure of the heating circuits. If you are seeing condensation inside the dryer, it is strongly recommended the you inspect and clean the dryer exhaust vent hose. You should repeat this a couple of times a year to ensure it remains obstruction free.

The most frequent causes of dryer vent clogs comes from the following:

1. Ducting that runs in an upward direction in homes that have an attic exhaust. This is a stupid design that gravity will always win. When the dryer shuts offf, anything left in the vent will fall down the ducting to the base of the wall and accumulate. Over time, this forms a clog.

2. Ducting that runs under the home in a crawl space. If not correctly hung from the rafters, the ducting will develop sags causing choke points where lint can accumulate. Leaving it on the ground is not the answer, either. This gives opportunity for rodents to possibly chew through it. This will cause leaks which exhausts warm moist air under your home resulting in mold and mildew.

3. Using plastic dryer vent hose. This type of hose is not recommended because it kinks easily and can get crushed, causing an obstruction where lint can clog. Rodents can also chew through it easily. Pushing the dryer up against the wall and crushing the hose is a common cause. Use the semi-rigid metal type ducting that resists crushing, kinks and rodent infestation.

4. Rodents. Mice love lint. If given the access to it, they will build inside the dryer vent hose which provides a nice warm place to live with lots of bedding material. Make sure you exhaust vent on the exterior of your home is about 12 inches from the ground.

5. Exhaust vent screens. I know there are many types of exhaust vents on the market that you can purchase that have screens on them to prevent birds and rodents from entering them. The screen can actually become and obstruction, though. The smaller the opening, the more resistance the blower fan meets and lint will clog at the end of the exhaust. If you chose to use a protected exhaust vent, the ones with louvers work better. You will still need to periodically check the ensure it does not become clogged.

6. Excessively long vent hose. The rule of thumb when it comes to dryer vent ducting is: The SHORTER and STRAIGHTER the run, the BETTER. Excessively long dryer vent hoses will clog due to the fact that the blower fan is not able to push all the air and lint all the way to the exhaust.

7. Kinked, Excessively Bent, or Crushed vent hoses. If the vent has any choke points due to kinks, bends, or gets crushed behind the dryer, you will develop ponts where the exhaust vent will clog.

The following link may also help in providing some basic guidance on how to install dryer vent hose:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r389357-dryer_ducting_installation_tips

I know it may seem that I'm beating this point to death, but it is important to provide good air flow for your dryer. The number one cause of dryer failures and house fires comes from poorly maintained and poorly installed ventilation ducting.

If you have any questions, please let me know. I hope you find this information helpful.

Sep 07, 2009 | Dryers

1 Answer

The lint screen does not capture lint. The lint


To dispell a common myth. There is no lint screen that catches ALL the dryer lint. Some lint will always get exhausted through the dryer vent exhaust ducting along with the moisture from your clothing as it dries. If the exhaust vent remains unobstructed, all the air and lint will be blown out the end of the dryer vent exhaust. However, if the air meets any resistance from kinks, excessive bends, or sags, moisture will build up inside the dryer vent exhaust causing the lint to stick to the interior walls of the vent hose. Over time this lint builds up and forms a clog. It is strongly recommended to have the exhaust vent hose checked and/or cleaned a couple of times a year to ensure it remains obstruction free.

The most frequent causes of dryer vent clogs comes from the following:

1. Ducting that runs in an upward direction in homes that have an attic exhaust. This is a stupid design that gravity will always win. When the dryer shuts offf, anything left in the vent will fall down the ducting to the base of the wall and accumulate. Over time, this forms a clog.

2. Ducting that runs under the home in a crawl space. If not correctly hung from the rafters, the ducting will develop sags causing choke points where lint can accumulate. Leaving it on the ground is not the answer, either. This gives opportunity for rodents to possibly chew through it. This will cause leaks which exhausts warm moist air under your home resulting in mold and mildew.

3. Using plastic dryer vent hose. This type of hose is not recommended because it kinks easily and can get crushed, causing an obstruction where lint can clog. Rodents can also chew through it easily. Pushing the dryer up against the wall and crushing the hose is a common cause. Use the semi-rigid metal type ducting that resists crushing, kinks and rodent infestation.

4. Rodents. Mice love lint. If given the access to it, they will build inside the dryer vent hose which provides a nice warm place to live with lots of bedding material. Make sure you exhaust vent on the exterior of your home is about 12 inches from the ground.

5. Exhaust vent screens. I know there are many types of exhaust vents on the market that you can purchase that have screens on them to prevent birds and rodents from entering them. The screen can actually become and obstruction, though. The smaller the opening, the more resistance the blower fan meets and lint will clog at the end of the exhaust. If you chose to use a protected exhaust vent, the ones with louvers work better. You will still need to periodically check the ensure it does not becoe clogged.

6. Excessively long vent hose. The rule of thumb when it comes to dryer vent ducting is: The SHORTER and STRAIGHTER the run, the BETTER. Excessively long dryer vent hoses will clog due to the fact that the blower fan is not able to push all the air and lint all the way to the exhaust.

7. Kinked, Excessively Bent, or Crushed vent hoses. If the vent has any choke points due to kinks, bends, or gets crushed behind the dryer, you will develop ponts where the exhaust vent will clog.

The following link may also help in providing some basic guidance on how to install dryer vent hose:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r389357-dryer_ducting_installation_tips

I know it may seem that I'm beating this point to death, but it is important to provide good air flow for your dryer. The number one cause of dryer failures and house fires comes from poorly maintained and poorly installed ventilation ducting.

If you have any questions, pleae let me know. I hope you find this information helpful.

Aug 19, 2009 | Whirlpool Duet 7.0 Cu. Ft. Super Capacity...

2 Answers

Burning smell


you can unplug the unit , and reomve the lower aces panel (3 screws along the front bottom of unit) youll probalby see an excess of lint built up in which case you can vacuum it out, and then check/clean and or replace your dryer vent

Nov 16, 2008 | Kenmore Elite HE4 Electric Dryer

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