Question about Kenwood VR-405 Receiver

1 Answer

Buzzing in speakers

What causes humming/buzzing in my speakers when receiver is turned on?

its most noticable when i power on tv also

Posted by on

  • avenueed Jul 18, 2008

    I have a pioneer elite vsx 95 reciever that makes a humm or buzz sound on all channels. (A or B and center channels) Please advise. It didnt always do this. I have tried other power supplies including a dedicated circuit so I know its not from any interference from anything else.

×

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    Problem Solver:

    An expert who has answered 5 questions.

  • Contributor
  • 7 Answers

First, if the buzzing came in gradually, I would suspect the filter caps. If it started suddenly and goes up and down with volume control, I would think it is in signal path - maybe the dsp board.

Posted on Oct 18, 2008

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

After a power outage I have a loud hum.


Hi, The Ground Rules Of all the annoyances that can afflict any audio/video home theater or even a simple stereo installation, the notorious "ground loop" may well be the most difficult and persistent one to track down and eliminate. A "ground loop" is caused by the difference in electrical potential at different grounding points in an audio/video system. (All the grounds in an A/V system should ideally be at "0" potential.) A ground loop typically adds a loud low-frequency hum or buzz as soon as you plug in any of various audio or video components, including subwoofers, cable-TV outboard boxes, satellite-TV feeds, TV displays, amplifiers, A/V receivers or turntables. The buzz/hum is a byproduct of the multiple power supply cables and a ground voltage differential within your system and its network of interconnecting cables.

Here are some methods to help you get rid of ground loops. Try these first and don't waste money on a power "conditioner" which, in most cases, won't help. (There is no need to "condition" the AC power for your system. Your receiver or amplifier already has a power supply with its own filters and transformers. No further filtering is normally required.)

If you get your system up and running and hear an audible buzz or hum, the first culprit to look at is either the powered subwoofer or your cable-TV or satellite-box feed at the entry point to your system.

First, the subwoofer: unplug the coaxial cable that connects to your powered subwoofer to see if the ground-loop hum disappears. If it does, it's likely coming in through your cable/satellite TV feed.

Reconnect your subwoofer's coaxial cable from the subwoofer input to your receiver's subwoofer output and disconnect the cable-TV feed (or satellite feed) from your outboard set-top cable box or satellite tuner. Be sure and disconnect the cable before any splitters. Now see if the hum/buzz from your subwoofer stops.

If that eliminates the hum, you can install one of these inexpensive in-line ground isolators from Parts Express or Bass Home. Note that these transformer-based ground isolators will work fine with analog cable-TV feeds, but depending on their design they may interfere with or block reception of HDTV signals via a digital cable or satellite dish feed.

Install the ground isolator between the cable-TV feed and the input of your outboard cable-TV box or satellite tuner (or the TV display's antenna or cable input if you have a set with a built-in TV tuner or a cable-card ready set). In many cases, the ground isolator will "break" the loop and remove the annoying hum or buzz by isolating the TV-cable ground.

If a hum remains with the TV cable completely disconnected from your system, or you don't want to risk degrading reception of HD signals from a cable or satellite system, then you may have to add a ground isolator like this Radio Shack Model 270-054 between the line-level coaxial subwoofer cable from your A/V receiver and the line-level input jack on your powered subwoofer.

In all cases, if your subwoofer has a ground-lift screw like some of Axiom's subwoofers, try first removing the screw (or replacing it) to see if it increases or eliminates the hum. It may or may not make a difference.

If you do not have easy access to the aforementioned ground isolators, here are a few more tips:

Try plugging the subwoofer into a different AC outlet in the room, one that isn't supplying power to your components (A/V receiver, TV, cable box, etc.). That might fix it.

Try reversing the AC plug for your A/V receiver or the powered subwoofer. If it's a 3-wire plug or a polarized plug, which has one prong wider than the other, you won't be able to reverse the plug. For safety, do not use a "cheater plug" to bypass the 3-wire plug.

With the power OFF, reverse the AC plugs one by one of any other components that have a standard 2-prong AC plug that isn't polarized. Each time you reverse a plug, turn on the system with the attached component and your subwoofer and see if the hum disappears. In some cases, reversing one or more plugs will eliminate the hum.

If you have a turntable, try connecting a separate ground wire to a chassis screw on your preamp or receiver and see if the hum disappears. If you already have a turntable ground wire, try removing it from the preamp. One or the other may eliminate the hum.

Finally, here is another solution that worked well for a member of our message boards who decided to discard his ground-loop isolator on his subwoofer: "I took off the ground-loop isolator I'd been using and connected a plain 14-gauge wire to chassis screws on the sub and the receiver then powered everything on. Although hum was still there, it was far lower than before. Next I unscrewed the ground-loop screw on the back of the sub and that took care of the hum completely."

Almost certainly sounds like an earth loop to me, but can be caused by a poorly made transformer or phase shifts on the mains supply. Visit some power conditioner web-sites like Isotek or Isol-8 (or google "earth loop") where there's plenty of advice on how to reduce/eliminate earth loops and other causes of mains-induced hum (transformer problems etc).

Hum on the speakers usually indicates that there is a DC voltage on the speaker line. DC voltage on the output lines would be caused by a shorted output transistor.


Have a nice day...

Feb 16, 2011 | Cambridge Soundworks BassCube 12 Speaker

1 Answer

When I have my Yamaha receiver and TV on I hear a distinct buzzing hum noise from my main external speakers What could be causing this sound I have turned all other components off"


Make sure none of the cabling passes near the TV or any source of high electromagnetic fields. If you have track lighting, turn it off.

Get the TV-related audio digitally from the cable box instead of analog via the TV.

Jun 14, 2010 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

I recently connected my satellite reciever to my


Iassume you mean you hear the buzz independently of the audio program - simply connecting the cable causes the buzz?

If tanything in the mix is powered from different AC sources you may have a different ground potential. Sometimes manipulating the orientation of one or more ac plugs will solve hum problems.

Apr 02, 2010 | M&K Sound Mp Series MX-350 MK II THX...

1 Answer

LG 42LH30 Audio Problem (Background Buzzing)


Ur power supply board.Transformers have have high voltage gap.This problems must take the tv aparts put some glue arond the transformers,sometime solved this problems,or must replaced all the trnsformers make the humming noise.Brand new tv take it back,where u bought it get a replacement or call the Manufacture help to fix the problems or replaced the part that cause the problem.

Feb 08, 2010 | LG 42LH30 42 in. LCD TV

2 Answers

LOUD BUZZING/HUMMING SOUND- CAN HEAR OVER AUDIO


have someone check speaker ground to the TV chassis. Your speakers are picking up reverb from the Video Signal.

Aug 19, 2009 | Vizio L37 Television

1 Answer

A couple of weeks after initial setup of my brand new Onkyo XT-SR606 receiver, I noticed a loud buzzing noise that starts up approximately 10 min after the receiver is turned on. The buzzing is definitely...


The "buzz" you hear is a power hum made by the power supply transformer. It's technically called "Lamination hum" caused by the revering of electrical current through the power supply transformer. In some cases the hum can vibrate the chassis causing other loose material to vibrate. If you can, go to your dealer and check to see if other units of this same type typically make a hum this loud, and if not, see if he can solve the problem for you.

Feb 27, 2009 | Onkyo TX-SR606 Receiver

3 Answers

Loud humming buzzing sound coming from subwoofer


make sure you have the speaker connection right if you do then it is a ground problem try plugging it in a different outlet

Dec 16, 2008 | KLH HTA-4906 System

2 Answers

One speaker buzz when cold


It works fine for a couple of minutes the starts to hum. If you turn up the volume it masks the noise but is till audible, also the video switching cuts out. after examining the components I have seen some heat discoloration in the power suply area and believe it to be power for the video board. disconecting the ribbon cable form the video board the hum goes away, and so does any video wich does'nt matter for me because my monitor1.gif does all the HD video1.gif switching. hope this may help with some noise problems.

Jan 23, 2008 | Harman Kardon AVR 225 Receiver

3 Answers

Buzzing from speakers


sounds like a capacitor is taking a long time to do it's job. You might want to see how much it would cost to repair.

Jan 13, 2008 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Buzzing noize


Have you tried using a different power adaptor? I have noticed with mine that the as the original failed there was a noticeable hum, a new power supply (of reasonable quality) solved the problem.

Feb 15, 2007 | ElectroVoice RE-1 UHF Wireless Handheld...

Not finding what you are looking for?
Kenwood VR-405 Receiver Logo

Related Topics:

228 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Kenwood Audio Players & Recorders Experts

 Grubhead
Grubhead

Level 3 Expert

4861 Answers

Eddie Dalton
Eddie Dalton

Level 1 Expert

41 Answers

Henry  Thomas
Henry Thomas

Level 3 Expert

1074 Answers

Are you a Kenwood Audio Player and Recorder Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...