Question about Carson Optical Carson 40100x60mm SkyWatcher Telescope

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Carson JC-Skyseeker telescope

Having trouble adjusting focus. right now all we see is just black no stars. using the lower eyepiece like instructions request but still nothing. tried the higher vision scope and still get black. followed the instructions to line up with the vision scope can see clearly with vision scope but not through the actually telescope vision piece. please help. segargal@hotmail.com

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Practice focusing during the Day Time on a distant object-- use the eyepiece with the largest number written on it and do NOT use the 2x barlow if you have one-- just the eyepiece.

Turn the focus knob until the distant object comes into focus. Objects in the night sky are TINY and your scope must be pointed right at them-- the moon which is a large target should be your first night time object.

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Posted on Jul 14, 2011

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Take the flipping cover off

Posted on Jul 28, 2009

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The easiest way is to simply point it at the sky and focus on any star. (Note: NEVER point your telescope at the sun without appropriate special equipment in place, and the knowledge of how to use it!) Use a low-power eyepiece (one with the longest focal length marked on it, usually about 20mm), and adjust the focus until the star image is as sharp as possible. You may see nothing at first except a dark gray blur, but turn the focus knob in or out until you can see the star image. You will need to adjust focus slightly if you change to a different eyepiece, but it'll be close.

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Ido not know how to assemble it. The instructions are generic for all their telescopes. Where do I out the different lens that came with it? How do I install them? Help please.


The lower the number on the eyepieces the HIGHER the magnification. The 2x barlow DOUBLES the magnification of each of the eyepieces. To start just put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the focuser, and use that ONLY until you learn how to focus properly.

The eyepieces fit right into the hole in the focuser.


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Because the camera has a different focus point from the eyepiece. TURN the focus knob until the camera comes into focus. OR you can buy a "focus ring" for the eyepiece which attaches to the barrel of the eyepiece and is adjustable-- then focus with the camera FIRST and then insert the eyepiece with the ring on it and lift it UP until the image comes to focus-- then tighten the ring. NOW you can use that eyepiece to roughly focus the camera.

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Hi ive got a galaxsee tasco telescope but im having trouble seeing anything at night, i've took all the caps off lined up on a star but its just pitch black can you help thanks.


1. During the day, point the scope towards an object and align the finder scope to the telescope.
2. First object at night should be the moon. it will verify your finderscope alignment and you should have a clear view of the moon.
3. Use your lowest power eyepiece (largest number in mm) and point the finderscope to a star. The star should be in the center of the eyepiece.. If not, adjust the finder until it and the scope are centered.
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We cant see anything but black


New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

It is best when you are starting out with a telescope to try it with the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the highest number) to begin with, until you become more familiar with how it works. Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

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2 Answers

All we see through the telescope is black


New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

It is best when you are starting out with a telescope to try it with the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the highest number) to begin with, until you become more familiar with how it works. Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

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1 Answer

I cant see anything through my telescope


New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

It is best when you are starting out with a telescope to try it with the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the highest number) to begin with, until you become more familiar with how it works. Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

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1 Answer

How to assemble carson telescope


Look at the picture on this web site:
http://www.opticsplanet.net/carson-50mm-aim-telescope.html

Notice that the "diagonal" goes into the telescope first and then the eyepiece goes into the diagonal.

This is a very poor quality telescope with plastic focuser and even the eyepieces are plastic. Read my TIPS on my profile page. 50mm is exactly the same aperture as a pair of 10x50mm binoculars. For Astronomy the binoculars would have been more useful than this small telescope.

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1 Answer

Like others, I have trouble seeing stars. There is an obstruction, an image of the secondary mirror which obscures most of the star. Is this the spider? Others have asked the same question, but I haven't...


Yes, you are not focusing the telescope properly. When in focus you cannot see the spider.

Put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the telescope. Go outside during the day and practice focusing on a distant object.

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2 Answers

Cant see out of 49114500 telescope


You're on the right track since you can see something with the large eyepiece. The smaller ones will work the same basic way, but only for objects that are farther away. When you use a smaller eyepiece, the magnification goes up, and usually, the higher power eyepieces may not work for close objects.

Try looking thru the middle size eyepiece at a very distant big object, that is much further away, like at least 1/4 or 1/2 mile, in daytime. Try adjusting thru the entire adjustment range slowly, and at some point, you should see the image appear, and sharpen up.

The middle eyepiece will be typically be harder to focus easily, since the focus range is smaller. Likewise, the smallest eyepiece will be even touchier, but its the same process. Just turn the adjustment knob slowly.

It also helps sometimes to hang a weight like a book from the center of the telescope or tripod to help stabilize everything.

All of this will be easier in the daytime first to get practise, and to learn how careful you have to be. Good Luck.

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