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I am building my own speaker for he first time.i have 2 subb woofers/mid and tweeter but only ave three way cross over what would be the best and safest way of wiring up the speakers?

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Hi first thing: do you have a passive or active crossover??

  1. Passive crossover: you can connect the two output together to your subwoofer to have in the same time the low bass and the mid range of frequency.
  2. Active crossover: NO solution you have choose one out put of your crossover, i guess the best is the low output, but the choice is in your hand try the the two output(low/mid) once and choose the best for you
Let me know, bye

Posted on Apr 23, 2008

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How to hook up Panasonic SB PM19 speakers to SA-PM23 reciever


yes you can. these are called "bi wired" speakers which means there's a hook up for the woofer and the tweeter individually. If your amp have just 2 speaker hookups it's no problem to hook the woofer/tweeter wires of each speaker together. If your amp had 4 speaker hookups, you could put the tweeters in 1 and the woofers in the other but it will still work fine with 2 speaker hookups.

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To Mr. Hyde: you appear experienced with Bose 501 Series III speakers. I need to replace a burned out glass bulb fuse inside the right speaker, the fuse for the woofer I believe. I think that you said that...


Hello whit_hughes,

Just received your request for some information regarding Bose 501's......... Series III. Your looking for te manufacturers part # for the fuse which is in line with the woofer? The fuses used ON the Series III Crossovers (hard wired/soldered directly to crossover board/componants) have been Identified as BUSS #2494, 2amp, Quick-Blow Glass Tube Type Fuses. The fuse which is in-series with the woofer & the fuse which is in-series with the pair of tweeters are the same! In theory this means that the woofer is capable of twice the wattage of the tweeters due to the tweeters being wired in series with each other..... which in turn divides the power beween the two equaly. On the woofer circuit there is only the one speaker or voice coil obsorbing the power. The woofer circuit being wired in parallel with the tweeter circuit again splits the power between the two cuircuits..... so in an ideal situation the woofer sees 50% total input power while the tweeters each see 25% total input power;;;; totaling 100% total. The way Bose has fused them in the Series III's is such that each branch can obsorb a total of 2 amps before shutting down each indivigual branch. This can be adventageous..... should peak power be exceeded causing loss of full load abruptly, Amplifier Power Output Transistors usually blow..... however when only half of the full cuircuit shuts down due to peak power exeeding limits causing one fuse to open (blow) ... the actual impedance (resistance) of the speaker increases protecting the Amplifiers Output Transistors! Thats the reason for the 2 fuses. Each of them are identical. They are soldered into place.... via the wire which is attached to each end of the fuse. (Note; the fuse "kit" Bose is trying to sell you is an external in line fuse holder for each speaker {costing 1.29 each} & 2 fuses for each holder, One for now & One for Later aftr it blows {costing 1.00 each}..... costing Bose 6.58, neting Bose $13.42 Profit!!!! Keep in mind that this fuse WILL NOT FIX YOUR PROBLEM EITHER! DUE TO THE FUSE WHICH IS PRESENTLY BLOWN HAS NOT BEEN REPLACED!!!!! ) The one that has to be replaced is on the crossover... not between the Amplifier & the Speaker Enclosure. Tools required = 1 Long Big Straight Blade Screwdriver to pry off speaker grill, 1 Phyllips Screwdriver to remove screws seccuring woofer to encloser... be carefull not to damage/tear gasket, 1 pair side cutters to cut blown fuse out of crossover curcuit, 1 pair needle nose pliers to attach NEW fuse to crossover curcuit, 1 soldering Iron & a small piece of solder to re-solder fuses leads securly to crossover curcuit. ( replace gasket, woofer, screws, & speaker grill. ENJOY! Should additionaL informaton be required please let me know.... you'll have to leave me your e-mail address for pictures or drawings.... as I don't think they can be sent through this site. Hope this helps ya..... Its an EASY JOB...... you CAN DO IT! & will be glad you did when your done, they'll sound GREAT! ) GOOD LUCK!

Jun 22, 2011 | Audio & Video Receivers

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I have a couple active phobic loud speakers, one is completely out of commission and won't play anything. The other will play sound but only through the tweeter, while the speaker itself does nothing. I...


The tweeter is working but the woofer driver isn't which will change the impedance (ac resistance) of your amplifier output. The other speaker isn't working which will again, change the impedance even more. This could eventually damage the I.C. amps should you apply too much volume to the speakers.
You can turn the volume up to normal listening level and with your finger, slightly press the cone on the woofer in and out a couple of time. Does it engage in sound when you do this? If so, the woofer's coil is damaged and the woofer must be replaced. No sound? Open up the speaker (stereo off) and make sure both wires are fully secured to the woofer. Should they be attached securely, your woofer is probably defective. Should you have a crossover network, you can obtain a good, known working woof and temporarily wire it where the old woofer goes, turn on your stereo (minimal volume) which can verify the network pcb (crossover) is working.

Apr 13, 2011 | Audio & Video Receivers

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I have a pair of custom made bookshelf size speakers that I love. They are older speakers that use french made Focal 7" dual voice coil drivers. One mid-bass 7" driver and one tweeter per...


Hi,
Well, fortunately it was the woofer that blew out. The reason I say that is because woofer material should have little to do with accurate reproduction in that frequency range. Since I don't know the model number of the speaker that was discontinued, I can suggest to you what can be done to get a satisfactory result.
1st If you have the model number on the Bass Driver AND Focal has the specifications. Go ahead and match the characteristics using THEIR data. The most important characteristics, besides the size of the driver would be the efficiency of the driver in terms of dB out. And the resonance frequency.
If these two are matched up closely, you should be good to go.
Focal is known to make good drivers, however, if you have to go to another manufacturer and you match the specs as above, then you should still do well.
If you get a newer Driver from focal, some of the characteristics may have been improved upon over the older driver. Such as transient response. If that were improved upon, It wouldn't sound really different, but it would seem tighter in the bass range.
One other thing I suggest. If you do as I suggest above and are pleased with the result, Go ahead and replace the woofer in the other speaker.
One additional point worth mentioning. Many of the foam surround speakers used in the old days in audio have failed because the foam has literally rotted away, as may be the case with your woofer. I know, as I have re-foamed enough of them. If you find a satisfactory woofer with a butyl rubber surround, it will never rot.
That would be the best replacement, as it would be permanent (if you don't badly overdrive it)
I've been an audiophile for most of my life, and I love music. I REALLY feel for you. I think that you will come out this just fine.
I hope this helps you,
Best,
Mark

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2 Answers

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Home audio is typically 8 ohms. If the speakers you used were designed for mobile audio then this would be why the receiver is overheating. You may be overloading the output

Dec 04, 2009 | Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

When iturn on my Sony STR-DE325 it goes into protect mode


Try disconnecting all of your speakers, and then turn on you unit. If you have a defective speaker, or a short in your wires, your unit will go into protect mode. If your unit seems ok with the speakers disconnected, then turn unit off, hook up one of the speaker leads and try it. This way you can isolate the problem.......

Good Luck,

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Jul 09, 2009 | Sony STR-DE325 Receiver

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No tweeter output


sorry but if the woofers work you have blown the mids and tweeters

Apr 30, 2009 | Yamaha RX-V663 Receiver

1 Answer

Crossover?


A crossover is a circuit that breaks down a whole spectrum of frequencies into groups. For example, your speaker has 3 individual speakers (drivers) in it. There is a woofer, mid and tweeter. A crossover will send the appropriate frequencies to each of the drivers. The woofer can not reproduce high frequencies so it doesn't make sense to send them there. The sam can be said for low frequencies and the tweeter. The crossover point defines the splitting point of the frequencies. Depending upon what sub-woofer you are using usually the crossover freqwuency is either 80 or 100. Most often it is 100.

Hope this helps,
Dan

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I have a kenwwod AX-7 home theatre systems. the right side top speaker (tweeter) on one side does not work. i'm thinking there is a fualt with the amplifier on the right side.


If the only problem is the tweeter, and the woofer is still working, you do not have a problem in the amplifier. The problem is the speaker. The tweeter is blown or you have a problem in the cross over network in the speaker.

You can always switch the speakers and connect them to the opposite channel. You can do this very easy at the back of the receiver where the speaker wires are at. Put the left speaker wires on the right speaker and the right speaker wires on the left speaker. If the same speaker still has no tweeter you know that the speaker is the problem.

The only way this could be a problem in the amplifier is if you have two different sets of inputs for each speaker, one being the low end for the woofer and the other being the high end for the mid range and tweeter. That would mean you have two sets of speaker wires going to each speaker. Each set of speaker wires would have a positive wire and a negative wire for a total of 4 wires going to each speaker. I don't remember this system being set up that way, but I could be wrong.

I hope this was helpful, you should be able to get the speaker fixed at an authorized Kenwood repair center in your area for a reasonable price. As a guide, my shop only charges $25 for the labor plus the cost of the tweeter to replace a tweeter. Any other shop should be similar. Kenwood does sell replacement drivers for almost all of their speakers.


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