Question about Jenn-Air Refrigerators

1 Answer

Why are there 6 hour 8 hour an 10 hour timers to defrost a self defrosting refrigerator

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 500 times.

  • Master
  • 1,218 Answers

Good day,
The decision as what the time interval of a timer should be is determined by engineers and field tests.
There is more to the timer than interval. Timers are usually listed as 8 hours 21 minutes, 8 hours 30 minutes ect. The minutes is used to designate the time the control stays in defrost.
A general rule is if the interval is longer, the minutes in the defrost cycle is extended to compensate.
Other factors come into play such as the wattage of the defrost heaters and the defrost thermostat temperature.

The trend today, with timers is to extend the interval to make the machine more energy efficient.

There is never an issue to defrost more often then the original, but it will run the heaters more often, and cause increased operating cost and shortened heater life.
The short and long of it is you can use a 6 hour timer in any machine if the timer motor wiring is the same and the duration is long enough, but with the costs listed above.

Posted on Jul 22, 2010

  • amier132
    amier132 Aug 27, 2012

    THANK YOU

×

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi there,
Save hours of searching online or wasting money on unnecessary repairs by talking to a 6YA Expert who can help you resolve this issue over the phone in a minute or two.

Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.

Here's a link to this great service

Good luck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Defroster timer


Hello there,
Defrost timer is what is set automatically by the defrost unit consisting of the defrost thermostat, defrost heater and the defrost timer. It is the timer that sets the routine timing of self defrost in the refrigerator.
If the defrost timer goes bad, it will stop the defrosting cycle of the refrigerator.
HERE ARE SOME TIPS ON HOW TO TEST AND REPLACE YOUR DEFROST TIMER. http://www1.fixya.com/support/r10523722-test_defrost_timer http://www1.fixya.com/support/r10523742-replace_defrost_timer
Hope this helped. All the best Elect_Comp

Sep 26, 2011 | Refrigerators

1 Answer

AMANA ARB 220 ZCW ice build up in freezer compartment


Here's an inexpensive, though inconvenient, way to determine if the problem is with the self-defrosting system. Remove all of the perishable food from the refrigerator and freezer, turn the thermostat in the refrigerator to Off, and leave the doors open for 24 to 48 hours. (Be sure to have several towels ready in case the melting frost and ice causes the drip pan to overflow). This allows the refrigerator to defrost "manually." When the frost and ice build-up has completely melted away, turn the thermostat back to a normal setting. If the refrigerator then cools properly, it indicates a problem with one of three components in the self-defrosting system: The refrigerator is supposed to self-defrost approximately four times in every 24 hour period. If one of the components in the self-defrosting system fails, the refrigerator continues to try to cool. Eventually, though, so much frost builds up on the evaporator coils that the circulating fan can't draw air over the coils. There may still be a small amount of cooling because the coils are icy, but with no air flow over the coils, cooling in the refrigerator compartment is quite limited. The defrost timer The defrost thermostat (also called the bi-metal switch)

Aug 22, 2011 | Amana ARB220RCW Bottom Freezer...

1 Answer

Kenmore Freezer 106.727581: The freezer ices up and the temp goes up to 34 degrees. If I manually defrost it, it goes to 5 below zero in about 6 hours. How can I determine which of the below need to be...


The refrigerator is supposed to self-defrost approximately four times in every 24 hour period. If one of the components in the self-defrosting system fails, the refrigerator continues to try to cool. Eventually, though, so much frost builds up on the evaporator coils that the circulating fan can't draw air over the coils. There may still be a small amount of cooling because the coils are icy, but with no air flow over the coils, cooling in the refrigerator compartment is quite limited. Poor cooling is often the result of a heavy frost build-up on the evaporator coils. You can't see these coils without removing a panel on the inside of your freezer. A sure sign that there is a build-up is the presence of any frost or ice build-up on the inside walls, floor, or ceiling of the freezer. Such a frost build-up usually indicates a problem in the self-defrosting system or damaged door gaskets.Here's an inexpensive, though inconvenient, way to determine if the problem is with the self-defrosting system. Remove all of the perishable food from the refrigerator and freezer, turn the thermostat in the refrigerator to Off, and leave the doors open for 24 to 48 hours. (Be sure to have several towels ready in case the melting frost and ice causes the drip pan to overflow). This allows the refrigerator to defrost "manually." When the frost and ice build-up has completely melted away, turn the thermostat back to a normal setting. If the refrigerator then cools properly, it indicates a problem with one of three components in the self-defrosting system: The defrost timer The defrost thermostat (also called the bi-metal switch) The defrost heater. To determine if the defrost heater is burned out, watch this part testing video

Aug 21, 2011 | Kenmore Freezers

1 Answer

It seams to automaticly self defrost, draining into the trat below.


your refrigerator is supposed to defrost automatically, usually every six to eight hours depending on the type of defrost relay timer you have. Most timers are either six or eight hour. this is a normal condition.

Mar 17, 2010 | KitchenAid KSCS25FKSS Side by Side...

1 Answer

Model #596.58642890 Side by side refrigerator is not cooling. the compressor is running and the defrost timer works. How do I check the climate controls to see if they are working properly?


Hello. Thanks for choosing fixya! Poor cooling is often the result of a heavy frost build-up on the evaporator coils. You can't see these coils without removing a panel on the inside of your freezer. A sure sign that there is a build-up is the presence of any frost or ice build-up on the inside walls, floor, or ceiling of the freezer. Such a frost build-up usually indicates a problem in the self-defrosting system or damaged door gaskets. The refrigerator is supposed to self-defrost approximately four times in every 24 hour period. If one of the components in the self-defrosting system fails, the refrigerator continues to try to cool. Eventually, though, so much frost builds up on the evaporator coils that the circulating fan can't draw air over the coils. There may still be a small amount of cooling because the coils are icy, but with no air flow over the coils, cooling in the refrigerator compartment is quite limited. Here's an inexpensive, though inconvenient, way to determine if the problem is with the self-defrosting system. Remove all of the perishable food from the refrigerator and freezer, turn the thermostat in the refrigerator to Off, and leave the doors open for 24 to 48 hours. (Be sure to have several towels ready in case the melting frost and ice causes the drip pan to overflow). This allows the refrigerator to defrost "manually." When the frost and ice build-up has completely melted away, turn the thermostat back to a normal setting. If the refrigerator then cools properly, it indicates a problem with one of three components in the self-defrosting system: 1. The defrost timer 2. The defrost thermostat (also called the bi-metal switch) 3. The defrost heater If it still does not cool properly, there may be a problem with the refrigerant level or the compressor.
Hope this helps, Regards, Joe

Nov 22, 2009 | Kenmore Refrigerators

1 Answer

Refrigerator stopped cooling


My guess is that you have a defective defrost timer.

Most refrigerator operate on a 24-hour self-defrost cycle. It takes about 1/2 hour to complete. During that time, a timer shuts down the compressor, turns on a heater imbedded or surrounding the cooling coils, and melts any ice that has formed.

It then turns the refrigerator back on to resume its normal cycle. This happens once every 24 hours.

You might have a bad heater coil, but far more likely is the defrost timer. It's usually at the bottom of the refrigerator... A small black phonelic box with wires going into it.

While you've got the inside disassembled, you might want to check the heating coil, but my guess is that it's good. More often the not, the culprit is the self-defrost timer which is usually located under the refrigerator.

Newer models have solid state controls and sometimes have the defrost timer integrated into the circuit board, but some still have a separate defrost timer. I'd bet my reputation that's your problem.

Aug 21, 2009 | Refrigerators

1 Answer

I have a top freezer/refrigerator and notice that ice is accumulating in the freezer and underneath the freezer in the fridge. What are my settings supposed to be set at? What should I do?


It sounds as if your refrigerator has stopped automatic defrosting of the evaporator coil or has a plugged defrost drain.. Below is some information provided by: www.repairclinic.com, to help you understand what may be wrong with your unit. If it is not cooling properly, you may be able to get it cooling again, temporarily by removing all perishable items, unplugging the unit, and allowing it to stand idle wth the doors open. This will allow the ice to melt, which will allow air flow to resume normally through the unit. Allow several hours for the ice to thaw completely, then close the doors and return it to an operational status. Put water in both compartments and when satisfied with the results of temperature, i.e. frozen in freezer and cold in fresh food compartment, you can put perishables back in. This will allow normal operation for only about a week until the defective part gets replaced, then it will start warming up again.
If the drain is plugged then the diagrams should show the routing so you can clean it out.
Today, all but the smaller, apartment-sized refrigerators are self-defrosting. Self-defrosting means what it implies--though frost continues to accumulate inside the refrigerator, it melts automatically. The self-defrosting system has three functional components:

Defrost timer
Defrost heater
Defrost thermostat.
Defrost timer The timer is like a clock. It continually advances, 24 hours a day. Every 6 to 8 hours, the timer turns off the cooling system of the refrigerator and turns on the defrost heater.

Defrost heater The defrost heater is similar to the burners on an electric stove. It's located just beneath the cooling coils, which are concealed behind a panel in the freezer compartment. The heater gets hot. And, because it's close to the cooling coils, any ice or frost build-up melts.

As the frost and ice melt, the resulting water drips into a trough. The trough is connected to a tube that drains the water into a shallow pan at the bottom of the refrigerator. The water is then evaporated by a fan that blows warm air from the compressor motor over the pan and out the front of the refrigerator.

Defrost thermostat The process ends after either the amount of time specified on the timer or when the defrost thermostat near the cooling coils senses that the heat near the coils has reached a specific temperature.


Detailed parts diagram:
http://www.repairclinic.com/Refrigerator-Freezer-On-Top-Appliance-Diagram

Aug 13, 2009 | Whirlpool Refrigerators

1 Answer

Divider between fridge and freezer is heating up a lot.


Between the freezer and fresh food compartment is where the evaporator coils are. Frost free refrigerators aren't really frost free at all. Every 12 hours or 24 hours, a timer turns on a set of heating coils in the evaporator to melt the ice on them. If your refrigerator is otherwise functioning normally (normal cooling), it could be that you simply felt the divider it when the unit was self-defrosting.

Most refrigerators go through the defrost cycle unnoticed. When the cycle starts depends on when you plug in or turn on the refrigerator. If you'd prefer to change the time of your defrost cycle, simply unplug the refrigerator for an hour or two then plug it back in. Every hour it's unplugged will delay the defrost cycle one hour. To avoid having to remove food from the refrigerator, you might want to do this over several days, but it's cumulative so each time you unplug it for whatever length of time, it further delays the defrost cycle that length of time.

Your refrigerator has no idea what time it is (unless it's an electronic model with a built-in clock), so setting its timer to self-defrost in the middle of the night is an exercise in trial-and-error.

The other alternative... That the heater is turned on all the time... Would DEFINITELY affect the cooling capacity of the refrigerator and you'd notice that WAY before you'd notice the heat coming from the freezer/refrigerator compartment wall.

Jun 27, 2009 | Kenmore Refrigerators

1 Answer

Kenmore 27 refrigerator flashing "de" on front panel


it is defrosting, meaning its a self defrost refrigerator and it would defrost the evaporator coil so that the ice would not build up and block the air passing it.

it normally happens every 8 hours if it is a mechanical timer, or as needed if it is an electronic timer.

tnx 4 using fixya,

drcool

Sep 08, 2008 | Samsung CoolTech Plus / Basic Bottom Mount...

Not finding what you are looking for?
Refrigerators Logo

Related Topics:

259 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Jenn-Air Refrigerators Experts

Charles T Nevin
Charles T Nevin

Level 3 Expert

4070 Answers

John Tripp
John Tripp

Level 3 Expert

4655 Answers

Jose Pino

Level 3 Expert

563 Answers

Are you a Jenn-Air Refrigerator Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...