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Over air reception

I have an indoor antenna hooked up to my 19" LCD HD TV, and the HD signal is excellent (HD & SD). However, the signal only lasts for 16 minutes -- always 16 minutes, whenever I initally turn the set on. After a while I might get a signal that lasts much longer, but the first time is always 16 minutes. Is this significant? Is the problem with my TV or the signal transmission?

I have used a specially designed HD antenna and an old rabbit ears antenna. Both work equally well (actually, the rabbit ears work a bit better).

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  • RenzoRienzi Apr 25, 2008

    Thank you for your response, digiteyes.



    Unfortunately, I can't hook up my HD TV to an outside antenna, as I live in an apartment building. I live in the New York City area, and I'm not sure where I get my data stream; however, when I do get HD reception, it's perfect -- as good as the HD TV I have hooked to cable.



    My only problem is that the signal usually lasts only about 15-16 minutes, which is a fairly consistent amount of time. If I try a little later, sometimes I get uninterupted reception. What bothers me is the time: 15-16 minutes, which makes me wonder if there's something mechanically wrong.. Strange.

  • RenzoRienzi Apr 26, 2008

    Thanks for you help.



    I was concerned that the problem might be with my TV; however, it does work fine with component inputs (VHS and DVD), so the problem is probably as you have described.



    Again, thank you. I'll check out your suggestions.

  • digiteyes May 11, 2010

    Can you take your TV to connect it to an outside antenna that is known to perform well with digital reception?



    Where are you located and where are you receiving your signals from?



    p.s. There is no such thing as a specially designed HD antenna... if someone is selling them, claiming that... they are telling you BS. Any antenna that receives SD will receive HD, as they are both on the same data stream.

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Unfortunately, I'm in Australia and not familiar with New York TV transmissions, however, the reception principals are the same.

Your signals are most likely bouncing off walls etc in your apartment with several 'reflections' being picked up by your indoor antenna.

This 'multipath' reception causes errors in the digital signals.

Your receiver can correct a certain amount of errors, but if there are too many, your picture will pixelate and the sound will make loud noises and then you will lose reception altogether.

The fix for this problem is connecting to a roof-mounted antenna and signal distribution system. Most apartment buildings have one, however some only distribute cable channels.

There is a possibility of a fault with your TV, but from what you describe, it sounds like a signal issue.

Have a chat to your building manager and ask what system they use for FTA reception in your building.. perhaps there's a fault that they are not aware of.

Sorry I can't be of more help.

Good luck.

Posted on Apr 26, 2008

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