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Lint seems to be clogging dryer fan - Fisher and Paykel DEGX1 Electric Dryer

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Lint should not get anywhere near the intake of the fan...the filter should catch all the fluff from the drier....clean the filter or replace if its damaged.

Posted on Jul 20, 2010

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Maytag Electric Dryer Model LDE7600. I do not have a manual for this dryer (inherited dryer). The dryer is heating but seems to take forever to dry anything.


verhagenk, see this all of the time. the problem is probably with the vents being clogged up with lint. you see, in order for a dryer to do it's job, it has to have plenty of airflow. now it would be possible for something else, but you should start with this. you're going to have to remove the top and front panel. you should see a fan to the bottom left, take a look at that first. if it's all covered in lint and stuff, problem.
next look down into the door past the lint screen. you should be able to vacuum all of the stuff out of there as well.
any of the internal ductwork that you can get to, should be inspected and cleaned out, including the vent to the outside.
if you dont feel comfortable doing this, then i would hire someone to take a look at it.
when a dryer seems to take too long to dry the clothes, this is usually the problem

Jul 07, 2011 | Dryers

1 Answer

I have a wdr1242 washer dryer the dryer seems to take forever to dry clothes sometimes 2 hours or more even for just half a dozen socks


If your dryer is still heating up; Check the dryer vent hose, also check down inside where the lint screen goes. If no lint is obstructing there, check the exterior dryer vent. Sometimes you have a screen to keep birds and rodents out of there, and may become clogged with lint. If no screen, check inside the flap, maybe someone moved in, or dryer lint is clogging up your exterior vent.

Dec 08, 2010 | Tricity Bendix WDR1040W Front Load Washer...

2 Answers

Lint not catching in tray and is clogging the roof vent


This is common on all dryers. Not lint screen will catch all the lint although some are better than others. If you haven't already, you will need to clean or have your home vent cleaned (with a brush that goes all the way through the vent). If vent is not cleaned the lint will back up all the way into your dryer and cause a mess. You have stated your vent goes up to your roof so you will need to clean it every 6mths to 1yr. Aside from this there is no fix that I am aware of. Please rate me after reading this.

Dec 14, 2009 | Samsung 7.3 Cu. Ft. 9-Cycle Super Capacity...

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Dryer is not drying. Lint is not collecting on


There is no lint screen that catches ALL the dryer lint. Some lint will always get exhausted through the dryer vent exhaust ducting along with the moisture from your clothing as it dries. If the exhaust vent remains unobstructed, all the air and lint will be blown out the end of the dryer vent exhaust.

However, if the air meets any resistance from kinks, excessive bends, or sags, moisture will build up inside the dryer vent exhaust causing the lint to stick to the interior walls of the vent hose. Over time this lint builds up and forms a clog. With a clog comes condensation and longer dry times. The dryer will continue to run inefficiently and cause the heating circuits to work harder and overheat. This will eventually lead to a failure of the heating circuits. If you are seeing condensation inside the dryer, it is strongly recommended the you inspect and clean the dryer exhaust vent hose. You should repeat this a couple of times a year to ensure it remains obstruction free.

The most frequent causes of dryer vent clogs comes from the following:

1. Ducting that runs in an upward direction in homes that have an attic exhaust. This is a stupid design that gravity will always win. When the dryer shuts offf, anything left in the vent will fall down the ducting to the base of the wall and accumulate. Over time, this forms a clog.

2. Ducting that runs under the home in a crawl space. If not correctly hung from the rafters, the ducting will develop sags causing choke points where lint can accumulate. Leaving it on the ground is not the answer, either. This gives opportunity for rodents to possibly chew through it. This will cause leaks which exhausts warm moist air under your home resulting in mold and mildew.

3. Using plastic dryer vent hose. This type of hose is not recommended because it kinks easily and can get crushed, causing an obstruction where lint can clog. Rodents can also chew through it easily. Pushing the dryer up against the wall and crushing the hose is a common cause. Use the semi-rigid metal type ducting that resists crushing, kinks and rodent infestation.

4. Rodents. Mice love lint. If given the access to it, they will build inside the dryer vent hose which provides a nice warm place to live with lots of bedding material. Make sure you exhaust vent on the exterior of your home is about 12 inches from the ground.

5. Exhaust vent screens. I know there are many types of exhaust vents on the market that you can purchase that have screens on them to prevent birds and rodents from entering them. The screen can actually become and obstruction, though. The smaller the opening, the more resistance the blower fan meets and lint will clog at the end of the exhaust. If you chose to use a protected exhaust vent, the ones with louvers work better. You will still need to periodically check the ensure it does not become clogged.

6. Excessively long vent hose. The rule of thumb when it comes to dryer vent ducting is: The SHORTER and STRAIGHTER the run, the BETTER. Excessively long dryer vent hoses will clog due to the fact that the blower fan is not able to push all the air and lint all the way to the exhaust.

7. Kinked, Excessively Bent, or Crushed vent hoses. If the vent has any choke points due to kinks, bends, or gets crushed behind the dryer, you will develop ponts where the exhaust vent will clog.

The following link may also help in providing some basic guidance on how to install dryer vent hose:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r389357-dryer_ducting_installation_tips

I know it may seem that I'm beating this point to death, but it is important to provide good air flow for your dryer. The number one cause of dryer failures and house fires comes from poorly maintained and poorly installed ventilation ducting.

If you have any questions, please let me know. I hope you find this information helpful.

Sep 07, 2009 | Dryers

1 Answer

The lint screen does not capture lint. The lint


To dispell a common myth. There is no lint screen that catches ALL the dryer lint. Some lint will always get exhausted through the dryer vent exhaust ducting along with the moisture from your clothing as it dries. If the exhaust vent remains unobstructed, all the air and lint will be blown out the end of the dryer vent exhaust. However, if the air meets any resistance from kinks, excessive bends, or sags, moisture will build up inside the dryer vent exhaust causing the lint to stick to the interior walls of the vent hose. Over time this lint builds up and forms a clog. It is strongly recommended to have the exhaust vent hose checked and/or cleaned a couple of times a year to ensure it remains obstruction free.

The most frequent causes of dryer vent clogs comes from the following:

1. Ducting that runs in an upward direction in homes that have an attic exhaust. This is a stupid design that gravity will always win. When the dryer shuts offf, anything left in the vent will fall down the ducting to the base of the wall and accumulate. Over time, this forms a clog.

2. Ducting that runs under the home in a crawl space. If not correctly hung from the rafters, the ducting will develop sags causing choke points where lint can accumulate. Leaving it on the ground is not the answer, either. This gives opportunity for rodents to possibly chew through it. This will cause leaks which exhausts warm moist air under your home resulting in mold and mildew.

3. Using plastic dryer vent hose. This type of hose is not recommended because it kinks easily and can get crushed, causing an obstruction where lint can clog. Rodents can also chew through it easily. Pushing the dryer up against the wall and crushing the hose is a common cause. Use the semi-rigid metal type ducting that resists crushing, kinks and rodent infestation.

4. Rodents. Mice love lint. If given the access to it, they will build inside the dryer vent hose which provides a nice warm place to live with lots of bedding material. Make sure you exhaust vent on the exterior of your home is about 12 inches from the ground.

5. Exhaust vent screens. I know there are many types of exhaust vents on the market that you can purchase that have screens on them to prevent birds and rodents from entering them. The screen can actually become and obstruction, though. The smaller the opening, the more resistance the blower fan meets and lint will clog at the end of the exhaust. If you chose to use a protected exhaust vent, the ones with louvers work better. You will still need to periodically check the ensure it does not becoe clogged.

6. Excessively long vent hose. The rule of thumb when it comes to dryer vent ducting is: The SHORTER and STRAIGHTER the run, the BETTER. Excessively long dryer vent hoses will clog due to the fact that the blower fan is not able to push all the air and lint all the way to the exhaust.

7. Kinked, Excessively Bent, or Crushed vent hoses. If the vent has any choke points due to kinks, bends, or gets crushed behind the dryer, you will develop ponts where the exhaust vent will clog.

The following link may also help in providing some basic guidance on how to install dryer vent hose:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r389357-dryer_ducting_installation_tips

I know it may seem that I'm beating this point to death, but it is important to provide good air flow for your dryer. The number one cause of dryer failures and house fires comes from poorly maintained and poorly installed ventilation ducting.

If you have any questions, pleae let me know. I hope you find this information helpful.

Aug 19, 2009 | Whirlpool Duet 7.0 Cu. Ft. Super Capacity...

2 Answers

Moisture inside dryer door when clothes are drying. Model number DBXR463ED2WW


If you are experiencing moisture inside the dryer drum, then you have a clog somewhere. A dryer needs proper air flow in order to dry efficiently. If you have not had your dryer exhaust vent ducting checked anytime recently, now might be a good time to do so.

HOW TO DETERMINE IF YOU HAVE A DRYER CLOG:

Remove the dryer exhaust vent hose from the back of the dryer and attempt to dry a load of clothes as you normally would. The air escaping the back of the dryer should be forceful and warm (about 140 degrees F).

If the air flow is normal and the clothes dry properly, you need to check the ventilation from the point where it leaves the dryer, to where it exits your home. Check for kinks, sags or significant bends in the vent ducting that may be causing choke points where lint can accumulate. In addition, it is strongl;y recommended that you use the semi-rigid aluminum ducting as it resists crushing and is heat resistant.

If the air flow is weak, then you have a clog INTERNAL to the dryer. The lint screens do not catch everything. Some lint, along with moist air from your clothes gets exhausted through the blower fan housing and out through the ducting. This is normal. Lint can accumulate over time, however. If allowed to restrict the air flow, the moist air cannot escape and tends to permiate the lint with moisture. Once the lint becomes moist, it sticks inside the ducting and collects more lint to the point where it starts to restrict air flow and reduce the dryer efficiency. It is highly recommended that you check your dryer blower fan housing and internal ducting about once per season to prevent this.

If gone unchecked, the dryer will actually overheat to the point of failure. Accumulations of lint is also a major fire hazard. The majority of the dryer failures I have repaired were caused by poorly installed, kinked, or clogged dryer ventilation.

If you have any questions, please let me know. I hope you find this information helpful.

Jul 28, 2009 | Dryers

3 Answers

Electric whirlpool dryer turns & heats but does not dry


The following link explains how to troubleshoot a dryer no heat problem:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r630242-dryer_runs_but_not_heat

Pay particular attention to the section that discusses proper dryer ventilation. The fact that you don't see any lint collection in the lint trap could be a symptom of a dryer that is clogged, or an exhaust vent clog. An easy way of determing whether or not the problem is with the dryer, or the ventilation, is to remove the exhaust vent line from the back of the dryer and attempt to dry a load as normal. The air flow coming from the back of the dryer should be forceful and warm (about 140 degrees). If this is the case, the problem is NOT the dryer and may be attributed to something in the ventilation ducting from where it leaves your dryer to where it exits your home. An inspection of the vent ducting should be done to confirm it is clear and free of clogs or kinks.

If the air flow is weak, then you have a clog INSIDE your dryer. An inspection of the dryer blower fan housing should be done to ensure the fan is turning unobstructed and there are no clogs. If the air is cool, you probably have a failed component in the heating circuits.

Read through the link I provided and let me know if you have any questions. I hope this helps you.

Jun 22, 2009 | Whirlpool LER4634J Electric Dryer

1 Answer

Dryer wont heat


Your Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) is blown. It should read close to 0 ohms if good. In addition, it is highly recommended that you replace the Hi-Limit Thermostat along with the TCO. These parts are commonly sold as a set. Failure to do so can result in premature failure of both parts.

BEFORE you replace anything make sure you check your dryer ventilation for clogs. Cleaning the lint screen is not enough as no lint screen captures 100 percent of the lint. Some lint always manages to end up in the vent line. This includes the blower fan housing INSIDE the dryer. Most dryer heat related problems are caused by clogged ventilation, leading to an overheat condition. In an overheat condition, the TCO will blow.

Some things to consider:

1. Are you pushing the dryer too far up against the wall? This lead to crushed or kinked dryer vent hoses which will result in overheating. Leave about a foot space between the back of the dryer and the wall to prevent this.
2. Does your dryer vent line run through an attic or crawl space? These types of configurations are notorious for creating choke points where lint can clog. This is either due to gravity in an attic configuration. Or, sags and kinks in a crawl space configuration. Frequent inspection and cleaning may be required.
3. Is your vent line excessively long? This can cause lint to back up because there isn't enough force from the blower fan to push it all out of the vent exhaust. The rule of thumb is: The SHORTER and STRAIGHTER a vent line, the BETTER.

I'm not trying to lecture you on something that may not be a problem with your dryer. I merely put this advice out as a precautionary to prevent you from purchasing parts, only to have them go bad prematurely because you weren't advised of what may be causing the problem. The TCO blows for a REASON. The reason is generally caused by an overheat condition. You need to figure out why.

I hope you find this information helpful. Let me know if you require additional assistance.

Nov 24, 2008 | Dryers

1 Answer

Electric dryer keeps shutting off...


Be sure that there is a LOT of air coming out outdoors first. If there is, the hi limit thermostat is now defective from the abuse of your fire hazard, I mean clogged vent. (same thing) If not, the vent is still not clean enough. If it's flexible duct, replace it with solid duct. You could also have a clogged up lint screen, (fabric softeners commonly clog the screen) or the fan in the dryer may also be clogged up.

Jul 02, 2017 | Kenmore 64852 Electric Dryer

1 Answer

Lint Blows Out the Top!


Lint backing up into a dryer is generally caused by improper air flow, which is caused (generally) by clogged ducting. If you say your ducting is flowing freely then you may still have a partial back up somewhere inside the dryer. Usually the blower fan area and/or the lint screen duct leading into the fan area can build up with packed lint. If you're not appliance savvy, dryers can sometimes be tricky to get inside. I recommend using a long lint brush to access those hard to reach areas of your dryer. To answer your other question, the ducting should be as straight as possible. Bends and kinks are often areas where lint will start to build up and eventually clog. The first sign that you're having dryer vent problems will be longer dry times on your clothes. I hope this will help.

Apr 19, 2007 | Whirlpool LER5636PT Electric Dryer BISCUIT...

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