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I cannot print good photos from my phone because there are not enough pixels

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I asked sonyericsson if I updated my K310i will this solve the problem I was told it will make no difference. unless you know otherwise

Posted on Apr 22, 2008

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Why possible is 300 dpi printing images and text matter


What is DPI PPI and Why Do They Matter
To some extent, we're all photographers these days. With a camera on every phone and digital SLRs coming down in price, we've all got a trove of photos waiting to be shared. When it comes time to share online, print, or email our favorite images, many are unsure about how to set the image's resolution...
If you've found yourself in this spot, don't worry - dots per inch (shortened to DPI from here on out) is a concept that even confounds some professional graphic artists. Here's a primer DPI so you can stop worrying about technology and start sharing your photos.
Getting started
Digital photos are comprised of pixels, much like the individual boxes on a sheet of graph paper. DPI tells you how small those pixels will be when the image is printed. For example, "300 dots per inch" means that 300 pixels fit across each inch. If your photo is 600 pixels tall by 900 pixels wide, for example, it would come out at 2" x 3" inches if you were to print at 300 DPI. Keep in mind that most digital photos are several thousand pixels in either direction, but for the sake of simplicity, we'll use the more manageable 600 x 900 pixels.
Separating pixels from presentation
It's important to separate DPI from the raw pixel dimensions, and this is where even the pros slip up. DPI is not an indication of image quality or clarity. When you print that 600 x 900 pixel image at 300DPI, it'll likely look pretty sharp, because every inch is densely packed with pixels.
Now imagine printing that same image, with the same number of pixels, at a mere 30 DPI. As each inch would have only 30 pixels across, the density drops immensely and the image prints much larger: 20" by 30". What was once sharp now appears blurry, because each individual pixel is now ten times larger than before. By separating DPI from actual pixel count, we can understand that raising DPI doesn't magically improve a photo. DPI simply takes the same data (the original pixels) and alters how we'll view them.
Pin it It's all about context
Another factor is viewing distance. Just think of the eye chart at your doctor's office. If you're a bit nearsighted, the tiny letters at the bottom are illegible specks, while the letters at the top are easily discerned. In actuality, each tiny letter may be half an inch tall, but the distance makes them seem microscopic. Now consider our 600 by 900 pixel image. When we printed it at 30 DPI, the giant pixels made it look blurry. Were we to look at it across the doctor's office long hallway, however, it may look just as sharp as the 300 DPI print did in our hands. This illustrates how DPI is more about context than quality.

Pin it Pixels Per Inch
You'll notice I've been talking about DPI in relation to printing only. This is because while printers can produce a variety of DPI settings, a computer display's resolution is fixed - its pixel density is part of the physical hardware, and cannot be altered. When talking about displays instead of print, most use the term PPI, or "pixels per inch."
If you intend to put your 600 x 900 pixel image online, switching the resolution to 30, 300, or 3000 PPI is completely arbitrary, because the computer display can't change its density. As modern desktop displays usually have a PPI in the low 100s, the 600 x 900 pixel image will appear around 6" by 9" (mobile displays may be much higher). Of course, your web browser could display the image smaller if need be, but it will do so by averaging and eliminating pixels, not squeezing them to be physically smaller. This is why it's always important to keep your end goal in mind when working with images.
In summary:
• An image is defined by its pixel dimensions - # pixels tall by # pixels wide
• DPI/PPI determines the scale and pixel density at which image will be displayed
• What appears blurry from close up may look fine at a distance, so consider how an image will be seen
• Printers can produce a range of DPIs, while displays have fixed resolution
Whether you're a blogger dealing with an upload limit or are just trying to print a photo to hang on the wall, understanding DPI/PPI can go a long way. I hope these tips help you feel more in control of your images and how you share them with the world!


Oct 07, 2014 | Canon LASER SHOT LBP-2900 Printer

1 Answer

300 dpi nikon coolpix s51


DPI (dots per inch) is an output parameter and has absolutely no meaning to the camera. It has meaning only when you output the photo to a printer or screen.

Let's say you took a photo that's 3000 pixels on the long side. If you then make a 4x6 print, you're putting 3000 pixels into six inches so you're printing at 500 dpi. If you make an 8x10 print, you're putting 3000 pixels into ten inches so you're printing at 300 dpi. Either way, you're printing the exact same picture, only at different dpi settings.

The camera has to put something into the dpi field, so it defaults to 72 which is often used for computer screens. Just about any program you use to print your photos can change this number without affecting anything else.

Apr 07, 2014 | Nikon COOLPIX S51 Digital Camera

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I print out the photo with glossy photo papers and the prints become so grainy , even my photo was in very high pixels taking what should i do to print a good non grainy photo


Your printer software and the program you used to print the photo have settings to turn up the quality of the printer just for photos.
I suspect you just forgot to do that

Aug 21, 2009 | HP Photosmart C4180 All-In-One InkJet...

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With 5-megapixel camera, I want to capture maximum resolution.


how I get maximum resolution by 5 mp camera with small photo.

my friend mega pixel relates to the print out u want out of ur photo file,on the monitor screen everything looks same if u dont zoom too much ,

for 5X7 print 1 mega pixel photo looks fine and more than enuff if u want a 5X7 print out of it

for 6X8 and 8X10 2 mega pixel is ok and for further enlargements u need higher mega pixel

or if u need output on large LCD screens of like 46 inch and 52 and 60 inch then also u need good resolution pics to display properly other wise pixelation will appear

so how can i help u more in this pls rate me FIXYA for this if u like

Mar 17, 2009 | Mercury Electronics CyberPix S-555V...

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Printing photos


That is called pixelation and is usually the result of enlarging a photo, whether it be resized larger on the computer or printed at a larger size than it's original pixel dimensions.

Check your printer settings for a setting like "resize photo to fit paper" and uncheck it. Or print from a photo that is larger than the paper and it will reduce the size without any pixelation.

With digital photos you can always go smaller than the original, but rarely ever larger.

Feb 17, 2008 | Epson CX8400 All-In-One InkJet Printer

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Kodak z730 resolution issues


It sounds to me that for whatever reason, you might be trying to export the thumbnail copy of the picture. On a 5MP you are right its more than enough to develop in sizes up to an 11 x 14.

However (I'm not too familiar with the Mac software, my apologies) if you are exporting or saving the thumbnail to your card, they will save at a far smaller size, and would lead to your pixellation problems, and the reason why the pictures are not coming out okay.

Nov 19, 2007 | Kodak EasyShare Z730 Digital Camera

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Canon Rebel xti vs Photoshop!


What you are seeing is the difference between "pixel count resolution" and "embedded resolution". So in your example 2272*1704 is the actual pixel count resolution as recorded by the camera & 72 is the embedded resolution that tells the software (in this case photoshop) what the intended use of the picture will be. 72 ppi is the default for web pictures. You can change this in photoshop by going to the "Image" tab & select image size. The window that opens will show you the pixel dimensions i.e. pixel count resolution and the document size & resolution 72. You just change it to 300 for printing. You can change the default to 300 by going "edit", "preferences", "units & rulers" and setting the values for "new document preset resolutions". This is a complex subject, I recommend looking at the following web page: http://www.fotofinish.com/resources/centers/photo/resolution.htm Please update the question & let us know if the information given was useful to you - Good Luck!

Aug 15, 2007 | Canon EOS 400D / Rebel XTi Digital Camera

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