Question about Pioneer Elite VSX-9100TX Receiver

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Turntable into CDR/Tape/MD input has no volumn

Maximum volumn on receiver gives very low sound. Input from another source works fine.

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  • David Dunn
    David Dunn Jul 21, 2010

    What source sounds too quiet? Does it work on the other input you say is okay?

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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  • 15 Answers

SOURCE: poor sound

You need to connect most turntables to a PHONO input or buy a PHONO preamp. Many newer receivers do not have a PHONO input. The AUX port you are using would work fine for a device like a CD player, but turntables need to be amplified. You can buy an external Phono pre-amp from Radio Shack. I don't know anything about this site, but something like this device should work for you. http://www.phonopreamps.com/tc400pp.html

Posted on Jun 19, 2007

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SOURCE: VSX D511 No input select

I am getting no sound via my optical cable input. The back of the AMP says that the optical is TV/SAT but i can't change the input to digital it will only go to analog. DVD player is set to Bitstream all dvd options set to DTS, but still no sound going through. Any help would be apprecaited

Posted on Mar 11, 2008

  • 905 Answers

SOURCE: pioneer vsx d608-no sound

this is an IC failing , it changes the pre amplified audio to the amp.but there is most likely something causing this failure as well ,to much voltage to the chip , it will need testing

Posted on Dec 10, 2008

lynchms
  • 93 Answers

SOURCE: yamaha rx v663 receiver, turntable input

What you will need is a phono pre-amp, then you can run into the receiver with a line level input to an empty audio input on the receiver, you can try Radio Shack to obtain one.

Posted on Feb 11, 2009

dunnbiker
  • 8546 Answers

SOURCE: Equalizer for Bose 901 Series IV

There's good news and bad news. The bad news is that a multichannel receiver with Bose 901's attached as you have them will only sound right in STEREO on stereo analog material. For one thing, the other speakers around the room are not designed to receive its Active Equalization and for another, if you engage your Tape Monitor you will NOT BE ABLE TO HEAR DIGITAL sources. Tape Monitor is for analog stereo material only and on my receiver it disables any digital inputs so you really can't use the Tape Monitor circuit or attached devises for modern digital sources. However, you can still employ the various DSP options to spread 2-channel analog source material around the room. I do.

The good news. I have a setup similar to what I think you're trying to do and it works great! With one caveat - My receiver actually has 5.1 analog Outputs so I can drive up to 6 external amplifiers if I want to (I drive 4). Yours does NOT so we have to be creative in extracting the front two channels from your multi-channel receiver. The obvious place would be at one of the few OUTputs on the back, assuming you have one free to use.

I see Video 1 and MD/Tape have Audio Outputs. Use one of these to feed the Bose EQ. **

A separate stereo amp for the 901's was my solution. I run a Carver AV-406 (5-channel amp) for my 901's in Front, 2 Subwoofers and the Rear Surround channel, with the Active EQ between the receiver Front L&R Outputs and the 901's amp channels. My receiver controls everything and just drives the Center and Surround speakers.

You could get by with just a stereo amp for the 901's. A Carver M-200 is a good efficient amplifier that would have you cooking just fine (2x100W). Run it with the Active EQ between the receiver Front L&R Pre-Outputs ** and the 901's amp channels.

** Sony STR-DE595 (Video 1 or MD/Tape Audio Out ***) >>> Bose EQ Amplifer IN, then
Bose EQ Amplier OUT >>> new amplifier IN.


Attach the 901's to the new amp, set its volume to Max and run through your receivers speaker level setup.

*** In either case you will NOT be able to SELECT the source you use for the 901 Pre-Outs for listening, or else the 901's will not get any sound sent their way. This is what's happening to you right now when you select MD/Tape. You're disconnecting the source from the 901 EQ.

You may have to get ugly with your other input components to find them all homes on the receiver. The labeling won't necessarily match up with the device types. Mine is ugly like that and I have a lot of connectors, but I have even more input devices.

If you have CD, TV Cable box and DVD (typical) you need to assess what you have that is digital and use what you can wherever you can, then the leftover analog device(s) - PC? - can go into any available analog input that is left over.

Whichever of these connections you DO NOT use for the 901's will still be available for using some kind of conventional analog recording device or sound processor such as an EQ or dbx Expander. However, as with any digital receiver, selection of that device for monitoring will kill the sound from any DIGITAL source you have playing (or maybe it just won't allow you to monitor).

Posted on Apr 24, 2009

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The sound is really low if i press the aux tape cd phono or vcr the sound is there but really low


Instructions:
Evaluate your current receiver. Take a look at the back-panel connections to make sure you don't have a phono input. In most cases, the phono input will be clearly marked. If the connections are not marked, look for a set of RCA-style inputs with a grounding screw next to them; this is a phono input. If there isn't a phono input on your receiver, see if you have an open set of RCA inputs. If they are all occupied by other equipment, you can disconnect one piece of equipment, buy an A/V switcher or get a new receiver--preferably one with a phono input.
2 Purchase a phono preamp. The voltage output of a turntable is much lower than those of other peripheral devices, including CD players, tape decks and game systems. Although the inputs look the same, connecting a turntable to a standard RCA audio input will result in very faint sound output, if you hear anything at all. The output of your turntable must be amplified to a level of about 150 millivolts (mVs) before it reaches the receiver, so a turntable "pre-amplifier" or phono preamp is necessary.
3. Purchase patch cables. You'll need a set to run from the preamp to your receiver. Measure how long your cables need to be, and purchase accordingly. Resist the temptation to "go cheap," because better-quality cables will provide better sound.
4. Connect the preamp into the system. First plug the preamp into an AC power outlet. Most models have a small AC-to-DC adapter built into the plug. Then connect the cables from the turntable to the preamp, and connect your new patch cables from the preamp to the receiver.
5. Adjust the gain of the phono preamp. Most models have a gain control for fine-tuning. Follow the instructions provided by the manufacturer and adjust your system accordingly.

F150 Parts.

May 27, 2012 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

How do I link my technics ge 70 graphic equaliser to my technics cd player sl-pd7a and my technics md player sj-md100 with phono rca leads . Thank you Simon


It would help to know what other electronics (receiver, maybe?) is involved.

If neither of those devices is a recorder, why do you need to connect them to the EQ when your receiver/preamp may have the facilities to connect the two playback devices directly; and the EQ in a Tape Loop?

Scenario A)

Assuming you REALLY want to have the CD and MD input through the EQ because you can't attach them any other way...

CD audio OUT to Line In; MD audio OUT to Playback;

EQ LINE OUT to whatever analog electronic inout you have in mind.

To hear and Equalize the CD set the Input Selector to Source, EQ REC button OFF; to hear the MD equalized set the Input Selector to Tape, EQ REC button OFF.

====

Scenario B:

You have a receiver with only ONE Line Level Aux input and a Tape Loop.

Insert the EQ in the Tape Loop. Attach one of the disc players to AUX and the other to the TAPE conenctions on the EQ.

====

Scenario C

You have a Home Theater System or Audio Vido Reciever.

The following is some boilerplate I made up that should explain some usage limitations.


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.


Okay, back to the hook-up:


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Rec, Line-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Play , Line-Out.


So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer

Feb 01, 2011 | Technics Audio Players & Recorders

2 Answers

I am connecting an amplifier to my VR-407 to accomodate more speakers I have installed throughout my home. Where do I connect the amplifier?


Connect the amplifier input to the VR-407 using the receiver's REC OUT jacks for the MD/TAPE input on the back panel. This is a fixed line-level output for recording, and will work fine for driving the additional amp.

Jan 17, 2011 | Kenwood VR-407 Receiver

1 Answer

How do I hook up an ADC SS-100SL Equalizer to a Yamaha RX-V661 Receiver?


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver MD/CDR Out to the SS2 EQ Preamp- or Amp-In; Receiver MD/CDR In from the SS2 EQ Preamp- or Amp-Out.

So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.

[Or you could obtain a dbx Program Route Selector (check eBay, I highly recommend the 400x, of which I have two) and it would, while only using one receiver Tape Loop, allow for three discrete attachment paths for processors and three for tape decks with the added flexibility of front-panel selection of any and all, with the processors being before, after or between the source or tape decks. Plus it has a dedicated facility for an inline dbx Noise Reduction Processor that can also be juggled around via pushbuttons. Pretty neat.]

Dec 24, 2010 | Yamaha RX-V661 Receiver

1 Answer

Rear speakers L and R not working and MD in and out not working on my Sony STR-DB940


I'm guessing these are separate issues.

Has either one ever worked and stopped suddenly?

From the manual:
"No sound or only a very low level sound is heard from the rear speakers.
>>> Make sure the sound field function is on (press SOUND FIELD - MODE).
>>> Select a sound field containing the word "cinema" or "virtual" (see page 33-35).
>>> Adjust the speaker volume (see page 72).
>>> Make sure the rear speaker size parameter is set to either SMALL or LARGE (see page 20)."

Be advised that using any Tape Monitor loop (that's what the MD/DAT is) disables any digital sources. Not that that would explain the rear speaker failure. Analog sources can still be processed into various surround modes.

Any Tape Monitor use requires at least a live INPUT to hear anything.

May 29, 2010 | Sony STR-DB940 Receiver

1 Answer

Old turntable works but is too quiet to hear


It sound like you may have to hook your turntable up to a phono input. Turntables have low level outputs. The phono input is designed to amplify this low level more than the cd/dvd inputs do. If you do not have a phono input, you can buy an external "phono preamp" online. Hope this helps.

Aug 04, 2009 | Audio Players & Recorders

2 Answers

Hooking up Turntable to Yahama HTR-5660


you have to have a pre amp, or an old reciever with a phono input.

you dont have to use the aux input, the cd or md-cdr inputs will be fine, but you do need that preamp for that reciever

Nov 29, 2008 | Yamaha Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Equalizer for Bose 901 Series IV


There's good news and bad news. The bad news is that a multichannel receiver with Bose 901's attached as you have them will only sound right in STEREO on stereo analog material. For one thing, the other speakers around the room are not designed to receive its Active Equalization and for another, if you engage your Tape Monitor you will NOT BE ABLE TO HEAR DIGITAL sources. Tape Monitor is for analog stereo material only and on my receiver it disables any digital inputs so you really can't use the Tape Monitor circuit or attached devises for modern digital sources. However, you can still employ the various DSP options to spread 2-channel analog source material around the room. I do.

The good news. I have a setup similar to what I think you're trying to do and it works great! With one caveat - My receiver actually has 5.1 analog Outputs so I can drive up to 6 external amplifiers if I want to (I drive 4). Yours does NOT so we have to be creative in extracting the front two channels from your multi-channel receiver. The obvious place would be at one of the few OUTputs on the back, assuming you have one free to use.

I see Video 1 and MD/Tape have Audio Outputs. Use one of these to feed the Bose EQ. **

A separate stereo amp for the 901's was my solution. I run a Carver AV-406 (5-channel amp) for my 901's in Front, 2 Subwoofers and the Rear Surround channel, with the Active EQ between the receiver Front L&R Outputs and the 901's amp channels. My receiver controls everything and just drives the Center and Surround speakers.

You could get by with just a stereo amp for the 901's. A Carver M-200 is a good efficient amplifier that would have you cooking just fine (2x100W). Run it with the Active EQ between the receiver Front L&R Pre-Outputs ** and the 901's amp channels.

** Sony STR-DE595 (Video 1 or MD/Tape Audio Out ***) >>> Bose EQ Amplifer IN, then
Bose EQ Amplier OUT >>> new amplifier IN.


Attach the 901's to the new amp, set its volume to Max and run through your receivers speaker level setup.

*** In either case you will NOT be able to SELECT the source you use for the 901 Pre-Outs for listening, or else the 901's will not get any sound sent their way. This is what's happening to you right now when you select MD/Tape. You're disconnecting the source from the 901 EQ.

You may have to get ugly with your other input components to find them all homes on the receiver. The labeling won't necessarily match up with the device types. Mine is ugly like that and I have a lot of connectors, but I have even more input devices.

If you have CD, TV Cable box and DVD (typical) you need to assess what you have that is digital and use what you can wherever you can, then the leftover analog device(s) - PC? - can go into any available analog input that is left over.

Whichever of these connections you DO NOT use for the 901's will still be available for using some kind of conventional analog recording device or sound processor such as an EQ or dbx Expander. However, as with any digital receiver, selection of that device for monitoring will kill the sound from any DIGITAL source you have playing (or maybe it just won't allow you to monitor).

Jan 17, 2008 | Sony STR-DE595 Receiver

1 Answer

Want to connect the cd player to a turntable in place of a receiver


Right, so you have a turntable, which I assume was working fine before? It must have been connected to an amplifier or receiver. Keep this connection between your record deck & amp/receiver AS IT IS.

You want to make CDs from your vinyl? The best way to do this is to use the amp/receiver's tape/md/record loop. This "loop" sends the signal you are listening to from the amp to your CD recorder, and also allows you to switch to "tape" to monitor your recording during, or after recording, without deselecting your turntable (which would leave gaps in your recording). I will try to give you some useful information, but it all depends on your equipment & sockets, so if you're still lost after trying this, please let me know the make & model of your amp/receiver so I can check its functionality & give you some more helpful advice.

Your CD recorder has 2 pairs of phono (riaa) sockets, one to receive sound (input) and one to send sound (output) to & from your amp/receiver. You should connect the CD recorder's input (or record in) to the tape out (or record out) on the amp/receiver. And you should connect the CD recorder's output to the amp/receiver's tape in. Set your amp/receiver to phono (or however you usually have it set to listen to your turntable, and you should be set to record. When starting recording, I recommend that you use a CD-RW (a re-writable disc) so you can have a play around & get a good recording level that doesn't distort without wasting any discs.

Some amps/receivers don't have tape/md/record loops, in this case things can be a little more complicated & you might need to add a junction/switching box in order for it to work. I can help you with this too.

So best of luck & let me know how you get on.

Something that seems to come up a lot here & worth pointing out is that your dedicated AUDIO CD recorder will not accept data discs, only audio ones. That will be ones that say 80mins, rather than 700MB. These are a little more expensive but your recordings ought to be more reliable.

Jan 07, 2008 | Sony RCD-W500C 5-Disc CD Recorder

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