Question about Hunter "Lexus" Traditional 52" Ceiling Fan "Black" w/ three Blade Choices

1 Answer

I have a sears "designer series" ceiling fan which has 2 speeds like normal, so I installed a dimmer, but the motor hums. HELP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  • AsshoIe Jul 13, 2010

    The fan still moves at the same speed on the highest setting as it did with on/off switch. It can vary the speeds. The only problem is that it hums. It is not in the noise-sentitive area. I just need to know if this fan is suitable for dimmer switch. My other problem is that one of the blades is badly bent and wobbles too much on medium speed range, but wobbles a little on highest speed. How do I replace the blade iron?

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  • Master
  • 6,826 Answers

The motor will hum if it is underpowered by the dimmer switch.
In fact it should hum at 60 Hz, the frequency of AC power in the U.S.

There really isn't anything wrong with what you did, except
most people put the dimmer on the lights and not the motor unless by
mistake.

Hope this clarifies things.

Posted on Jul 13, 2010

  • AsshoIe Jul 13, 2010

    I want to know if it is suitable for this fan.

  • Duane Wong
    Duane Wong Jul 13, 2010

    In practice it should work, that if you put less amps to the motor through a dimmer switch that it will slow it down or speed it up infinitely.



    Are you just getting a humming sound but it's not moving at all? Or does it move faster or slower through a series of speeds?



    Do you want it to be infinitely adjustable in this way?

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Hi,

Guess what? A standard dimmer switch will not properly operate a fan motor. In fact, it’s most likely going to damage the fan motor and it could even potentially cause a fire. I’ll admit I even went out and bought a dimmer switch and I sat down to just “make sure” I was doing the right thing when I figured this out.
Standard dimmer switches are designed for the wattage of lights. Fan controls are designed for the amperage of the fan motor. So if you want to control the speed of a ceiling fan make sure you buy a fan speed control that specifically says it works for fans. Fan controls come in quite a few styles. The most common type has been around for quite some time and that is the rotary or dial type. The next most common fan control I found was the toggle that has three pre-set speeds (slow, medium and fast). You can also get a fan control that has a slider control along with a toggle switch.
dimmer+switch.jpgThe type that I want to install is a toggle switch with a small slider switch next to it. I have a feeling I’ll have to order one of these but I’ll check with my electrician tomorrow to find out the scoop. The bottom line is you can’t use a standard dimmer switch to control a ceiling fan. You have to get a fan speed control switch that is specifically designed to operate fan motors.












the short wire leads coming from the switch should be attached to other wires with small wire nuts. Just unscrew the wire nuts, unscrew the finial type cap that holds the switch in place, remove the switch and take it to the store. If your lights are strictly "ON"-"OFF" there should be just two wires from the switch. If your lights are controlled - "One" "TWO" or "THREE" at a time the switch will probably have three wires coming from it.
http://www.ceiling-fans-n-more.com/

Thanks for contacting Fixya.

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The fan does not need to be oiled. The bearings are what manufacturers described as "permanently-sealed", which means that they're designed such that they don't require oiling. The manufacturers recommend against oiling, and if you really wanted to do it, you'd have to be an expert, because there is some very complex disassembly to be done, which requires specialized tools.

HOWEVER...

The problem is not related to oil. A lack of oil does not produce a hum. If a fan's bearings are low on oil, the sound generated is a scraping or brushing sound. A hum, on the other hand, is an electrical sound. All fan motors hum to some degree -- the cheap made-in-China ones, like in your Hampton Bay fan, hum more than others. There are some steps you can take to reduce the hum:

* If you are using the fan with a solid-state control (i.e. a dimmer), that will cause the fan to hum. These controls are dangerous when used with fans, and a fire can result. You should have a qualified person remove the switch immediately and replace it with either a regular on/off switch OR a discrete-speed (i.e. 3-speed or 4-speed, rather than variable-dimmer) switch. Specially-designed ceiling fan switches such as this are available at your local Home Depot or Lowes. You could also use a remote-control system.

* If you have a remote control or other speed control system, make sure that the pull-chain speed control on the fan is set to the "high" position (highest speed possible) and left there.

* Make sure that all the screws are tight -- this includes screws which hold up the fan's mounting bracket, hold the blades onto the fan, and hold any applicable glass onto the light kit.

* Even if you don't have a speed control, the motor will still produce an electrical hum -- and the blades, which are physically attached to the motor, serve as mechanical amplifiers -- they take the tiny electrical hum and amplify it just like the big brass funnel speaker on an antique gramophone (record player) takes the tiny vibrations of the needle on the record and amplifies them to a comfortably audible level. High-end fans have a rubber flywheel attached to the motor between the blade holders and the motor unit -- and since rubber doesn't transmit vibrations well, this effectively deadens the sound. Your fan doesn't have one of these, but you can effectively replicate the noise-dampening effect by putting rubber washers between where the blade holders touch the bottom of the motor AND between where the screws which hold the blade holders onto the motor, meet the blade holders themselves. This will completely remove the path along which the sound vibrations can flow to the blades, and thus your hum will stop.

I hope this helps you! If you have any other questions, or need clarification, please ask!

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1 Answer

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The fan does not need to be oiled. The bearings are what manufacturers described as "permanently-sealed", which means that they're designed such that they don't require oiling. The manufacturers recommend against oiling, and if you really wanted to do it, you'd have to be an expert, because there is some very complex disassembly to be done, which requires specialized tools.

HOWEVER...

The problem is not related to oil. A lack of oil does not produce a hum. If a fan's bearings are low on oil, the sound generated is a scraping or brushing sound. A hum, on the other hand, is an electrical sound. All fan motors hum to some degree -- the cheap made-in-China ones, like in your Hampton Bay fan, hum more than others. There are some steps you can take to reduce the hum:

* If you are using the fan with a solid-state control (i.e. a dimmer), that will cause the fan to hum. These controls are dangerous when used with fans, and a fire can result. You should have a qualified person remove the switch immediately and replace it with either a regular on/off switch OR a discrete-speed (i.e. 3-speed or 4-speed, rather than variable-dimmer) switch. Specially-designed ceiling fan switches such as this are available at your local Home Depot or Lowes. You could also use a remote-control system.

* If you have a remote control or other speed control system, make sure that the pull-chain speed control on the fan is set to the "high" position (highest speed possible) and left there.

* Make sure that all the screws are tight -- this includes screws which hold up the fan's mounting bracket, hold the blades onto the fan, and hold any applicable glass onto the light kit.

* Even if you don't have a speed control, the motor will still produce an electrical hum -- and the blades, which are physically attached to the motor, serve as mechanical amplifiers -- they take the tiny electrical hum and amplify it just like the big brass funnel speaker on an antique gramophone (record player) takes the tiny vibrations of the needle on the record and amplifies them to a comfortably audible level. High-end fans have a rubber flywheel attached to the motor between the blade holders and the motor unit -- and since rubber doesn't transmit vibrations well, this effectively deadens the sound. Your fan doesn't have one of these, but you can effectively replicate the noise-dampening effect by putting rubber washers between where the blade holders touch the bottom of the motor AND between where the screws which hold the blade holders onto the motor, meet the blade holders themselves. This will completely remove the path along which the sound vibrations can flow to the blades, and thus your hum will stop.

I hope this helps you! If you have any other questions, or need clarification, please ask!

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