Question about Linksys 1 x 4-pin Type B USB 2.0, 4 x 4-pin Type A USB 2.0 - External Instant USB 2.0 Connectivity - The E

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Usb network adapter error

I have a linksys 2.4 ghz wireless-g usb network adapter. I have used it on my home computer running windows xp pro and it worked ok. I sense moved it to another computer running windows 98 and it was working. I just installed windows xp pro on this computer and when I plug in the adapter it resets my computer over and over again. the error message reads "access violation at address 00427441 in module wusb54gv4.exe. read of address 00000368. Any ideas?? Thanks

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  • Helpmepleass Apr 20, 2008

    Still doing the same thing.

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What I recommend is to uninstall the driver and reinstall it back again.Incase the 1st solution doesn't work then you need to uninstall the other driver off first,like sound and display, and install this wirless beferore them.I think conflict with the other driver.
Best of luck,takecare

Posted on Apr 20, 2008

  • Technocom
    Technocom Apr 22, 2008

    I'm sorry I wasn out of town.So my last suggestion can be that its not enough power on the USB port. But you said it was working fine when you use in Win98!!!! So my quesiton is that

    1.Did you plug on the same port like last time ?

    2.Did you use any external usb port ?? If so try to connect directly behind you computer.



    3.My last quest here is that ...if you still have the same problem then it can be all of a sudden you have a bad USB port..mean not enough power supply for your USB port.

    takecare

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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I am only getting 34-54 Mbps with my Linksys. I have a wireless adapter in my computer. It will go lower, but never than higher than 54 Mbps? I know i can get 100mbps because my Xbox does. Help me out!


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Dec 28, 2008 | Linksys 1 x 4-pin Type B USB 2.0, 4 x...

1 Answer

Hi there:)


TRY THIS:


call in your provider to change the ssid and the network key

[all computers will be disconnected]

and then try to reconnect them one by one to the new ssid or network name

this should resolve the issue

always make sure that the wireless properties are okay and the same as the router


also check the device manager: network adapters if they are properly installed and no errors on the icon for the adapters. for windows OS[]

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1 Answer

Netgear switch fsgo5v3


well, apparently your switch is taking off your PC from his arp table due to his inactivity.
try to release and renew the ip address in your machine instead of reset the switch.

Normally reset the switch will be you last resource.

go to START -->> RUN type cmd <hit ENTER>

a black windows should populate, its calles command prompt.

type:

ipconfig /release

then ipconfig /renew

this will force the switch to see your network Interface Card.



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to connect 2 computers without a hub/switch you need to have a cross-over cable. Normally a network cable only uses pins 1, 2, 3 and 4 with pairs 1,2 and 3, 6 on both ends. A x-over swaps the pairs on one end.

Go to a computer store near you and ask for one. Don't pay more than $10.

If you can't find one or it is expensive, let me know and I'll make an adapter for you and just charge around $5 for the parts and shipping. My email is fixya@pcsports.org and put "X-over Cable" as the subject.

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Setting up 16 port switch


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2 Answers

Setting up Wireless Security ? BEFW11S4


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