Question about Meade 70AZUSB Telescope

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I need a lens/eyepiece for the main observation scope where can i go to buy one.

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Many online retailers sell eyepieces. Measure the hole in the telescope.

They come in 3 sizes: .965, 1.25, and 2 inch.

Here are two retailers:

http://agenaastro.com/

http://shop.telescope-warehouse.com/

Posted on Jul 12, 2010

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About my tasco 46-060675 D=60mm F=900mm come with 3 eye lense 1(sr4mm) 2 (k10MM) 3(k25MM) and two tube 1(1.5x erecting eyepiece) 2 (3xbarlow lense


The different eyepieces are to give different magnifications. This is worked out by dividing the focal length of the telescope, f = 900, by that of the EP. So the 25 mm Kellner (that is the type of optics in the EP) will give 900 / 25 = 36 times magnification.

The erecting eyepiece is used for terrestrial viewing. Normally with an astro telescope everything is upside down as that does not matter when looking at a star. So when you want to look through someone's bedroom window you use this.

A Barlow lens is an add-on magnifier. If you add this onto any EP (it normally fits between the EP and the scope) it will increase magnification x 3.

There is a practical limit to what any scope will deliver, governed by its aperture (the size of the front lens) and for your scope this will be about x 120 magnification. Beyond that the image becomes too dim and fuzzy. This means that your 4 mm eyepiece ( x 225 magnification) won't be much use. It will be hard to find the object you are trying to observe, it will be hard to focus, and the image will wobble around. Nor is your barlow lens much use either I fear.

You might consider another eyepiece around 18 mm to give a nice spread. A Plossl type is good. If you get serious about astronomy, I think you will immediately want a better scope after using the Tasco.

Mar 23, 2015 | Tasco Optics

1 Answer

What does F=900mm and D=4.5 actually mean? Also the lens you look through is an H=15mm? Where can I find replacements or new lenses etc?


F900 is the focal length of your telescope. (achieves focus in 900mm) D=4.5 means you have a 4.5 inch mirror An H15mm is a Huygens 15mm eyepiece. Very old and, by now, poor design. magnification is fl of scope/ fl of eyepiece
900/15= 60x power. 4.5in mirror = (50x per inch aperture maximum magnification) 225x max power (on a perfect night)
To get replacement eyepieces first you must measure the diameter of your focal tube. Eyepieces come in 3 sizes .965in (on cheaper scopes) 1.25in (most popular) and 2in.( mostly higher end scopes) If you have a .965in focal tube, you are limited in your choices. Antares makes some .965 plossl eyepieces also surplus shed has some inexpensive eyepieces. Or, if you want to spend the money , get a .965 to 1.25 adapter. This way you can buy 1.25in eyepieces and they will serve you well when you upgrade to a better telescope.
1.25 eyepieces are available all over the internet.

Nov 22, 2011 | Tasco Optics

1 Answer

I have a Barska telescope. Model: 60800. Diam: 60mm Focal length: 800 mm. I think I put it together correctly, but I can not see anything through it... just black. Yes, I have taken the cap off the...


The power of the scope will be the focal length of the main objective (yours is 800mm) divided by the focal length of the eyepiece, so a 9mm eyepiece will give a higher magnification (and be dimmer and harder to focus and find objects) than a 20mm eyepiece. It is usual to have two or three different focal length eyepieces for viewing different objects.

Starting out, you want to use the lowest power, so the highest number, eyepiece. Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope. Try it out during the day (but never point a telescope anywhere near the Sun). This will make it easier to find the focus point. There is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount.

It is unlikely that the finder scope will be much use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Most manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match. Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scopes image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

Remember that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one.

Dec 31, 2010 | Optics

1 Answer

I would lke to get a higher spec lens for my konusmotor 500. What is the highest lens I can get for it and where is a good place to buy it?


Highest theoretical power is 250x but it has to be a perfect night. konus does have very good optics but at f/4.3 it is a low power, wide field scope. So 500mm fl / 2mm eyepiece = 250x. Eyepieces of that high power have eye relief issues as well as blurry edges unless you want to pay $500 or more
Here is a good eyepiece which will give you 96x and 20mm eye relief. I own the 12.5mm version
http://agenaastro.com/agena-5-2mm-ed-eyepiece.html
BTW I rarely go over 150x with my big scope, the higher the power also equals seeing more atmosphere

Oct 10, 2010 | Konusmotor 500 (230 x 114mm) Telescope

1 Answer

Needs nuts for lens


Eyepieces DO NOT have bolts and nuts. The eyepiece simply slips into the hole in the focuser. There is a tiny thumb screw that holds the eyepiece when it is placed into the focuser. You can buy a replacement at any well stocked hardware store.

Bring the scope tube to the store so you can measure the tiny screw hole and buy the correct thumbscrew.

Aug 21, 2010 | Celestron PowerSeeker 114 EQ Telescope

3 Answers

Lost lens to bushnell 18-1561


I have a similar problem with my Bushnell 18-1650!

As you can see below, the plastic thing that holds the lens snapped off from the telescope's diagonal, and is now lost along with the eyepieces. This is a childhood scope I'm trying to rescue!

Should I:
1) glue a new eyepiece straight onto the diagonal
2) buy a new diagonal AND eyepiece
Or do I need to just buy a new telescope?

Thanks in advance.

annahetherin.jpg

Sep 04, 2009 | Bushnell Deep Space 18-1560 (150 x 53mm)...

2 Answers

Trying to identify older tasco telescope and put it together


There are only two types of telescopes --- REFRACTORS, and REFLECTORS-

The refractor has a lens on the front of the tube and you insert different eyepieces in the back-- the larger the number written on the eyepiece the LOWER the magnification-- (DO NOT USE THE 2x or 3x barlow which you may have!-- this creates too much power for this small telescope!-- put it away and never use it!)

A reflector has a main mirror on the bottom of the tube, and a small secondary mirror under the eyepiece hole (focuser end) - front end-- put the lowest power eyepiece into the focuser.

Now with either type telescope go out side during the day and practice focusing on a distant object-- turn the knob SLOWLY. At night the moon should be the first target you try.

If you received what appears to be a smaller telescope -- that is the finder scope-- attach it to the top of the tube on the main telescope. Again during the day line up the small finder scope with the main scope-- look at a distant telephone pole (the very top-- and center this in the main telescope. Without moving the main scope use the finder scopes "screws" to adjust the cross hairs so they are pointing exactly where the main scope is pointed. Now you can use the small finder scope to point the telescope in the exact direction--

The moon should be your first night time target.

Good luck--

Mar 17, 2009 | Tasco Astronomical 302675 Telescope

2 Answers

Is it worth a rescue?


Hi there,

it's not worth spending too much, but if the mirror is in good order, it would make a fine starter scope. The very cheap and nasty scopes start around D=76mm, and often boast great magnifications, these scopes are virtually useless. The size of the mirror is the most important factor, and at 114mm, your grandson will have many hours of pleasure observing the moon and planets.
Eyepieces can be found on ebay very cheaply, but be sure to get one with the correct O/D they come in 0.96 in, 1.25 in and 2 inch. I expect your scope will be 1.25" I suggest you should buy a maximum of two eyepieces (around 30mm and 6mm) and a barlow lens. These will give you magnifications of 30X, 60X, 150X and 300X.
If you require any further assistance, please don't hesitate to ask.
Kind Regards......Dave

Jul 28, 2008 | Optics

1 Answer

What lens do i insert into scope to view the moon


The moon is big so use the 25mm. The Barlow will have a multiplication marking on it 2x 3x etc. A 2x Barlow lens will effectively double the power of the eyepiece you are using. Do not use the erecting eyepiece for anything other than land viewing. Erecting eyepieces generally reduce the amount of light reaching your eye and thus reduce brightness of the faint objects in the sky.
So basically just place the 25 mm lens in the focuser and point the scope at the moon and you will be amazed at what you can see and how bright it is.

Dec 30, 2007 | Tasco 350x50mm Refractor Novice Telescopes

1 Answer

Replace Eyepiece on Saturn F-900 Model 60EQ


You need an eyepiece This scope uses .965in eyepieces. you can find them on Ebay. Maximum magnification is 100x NOT 420x. These scopes have inferior optics and terrible mounts. Don't spend much on this scope. Buy a 20mm (35x magnification) http://www.ebay.com/itm/Astro-Optics-20mm-965-Telescope-Eyepiece-NEW-/230688144635?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item35b615bcfb or a 15mm (45x magnification) http://www.ebay.com/itm/Astro-Optics-20mm-965-Telescope-Eyepiece-NEW-/230688144635?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item35b615bcfb on Ebay If you are interested in astronomy, you need to spend some money on a good scope. Check out Orion for a great tabletop dob for $100 http://www.telescope.com/Telescopes/Dobsonian-Telescopes/Mini-Dobsonians/Orion-SkyScanner-100mm-TableTop-Reflector-Telescope/pc/1/c/12/sc/28/p/9541.uts

Oct 25, 2007 | Bushnell Deep Space 78-9512 (120 x 60mm)...

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