Question about Pentax 4-12x40 Gameseeker Rifle Scope Presion Reticle

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I zeroed in my 25/06 at 100 yards. at 200 yards 1/4 inch high using 2nd line on drop compensator , at 300 yards shot 41/2 inches high using 3rd line on compensator. What am I ding wrong

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It sounds good to me, don't forget, the 25-06 is a flat shooting round, you have your scope pointing up, the bullet crosses the line of sight twice, One at 100 yrds, your zero and the other on it's way down at about 500 yards. You can check the ballistic coefficient of that bullet and see where you need to be zeroing it in at. I would think about 250 yards, will be 1 1/2 low at 100 yards, 3/4 inches low at 200 yards, dead on at 250, then it will start coming down, say 8 inches low at 400 and 18 inches low at 500. Something like that. So your BDC will not be needed till you reach out past 300 yards, which is varmint country stuff. I have my .22 marlin sighted in at 100 yards, and it will put the lights out on anything at that range. You can probably find the charts on line someplace, if you don't have a reloading manual. Check it out.

Posted on Jul 20, 2010

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270cal. rem corlok 150gr. zero at 100 where at 50 200 300 400? where will it hit?


Zero at 200 and it'll be 1 1/2" high at 100 and about nine inches low at 300.

Sep 06, 2014 | Optics

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Situation--Having a discussion with son-in-law while sighting in my Winchester Model 94 30-30. I think it's sighted at 100 yards but shooting at 50 yard target. It is consistently high by about 5 to 6...


He is right the bullet at most will be 1/2 high at 50yards. Zero at 100 if sighted correctly. The bullet is flat to about 100 yards and will drop significantly for the next 300 yards. At 400yards your drop is almost 7-8 inches and at longer than that the bullet loses most if its effective stopping power for hunting and the drop is really significant. Not worth the effort......

Nov 03, 2013 | Bushnell Trophy 3-9x40 Rifle Scope, Matte...

1 Answer

How to adjust rifle scope


You need to sight in the scope and rifle to 100 yards then reset the dial making sure the knob as the manual says
do a check sight in
Then you turn on the electronics
the drop number you input is 112 and the BC is 55
as you haven't given an altitude for sight in or shoot site I have allowed for them being equal
you now shoot at a target at 400 yards and for each inch below or above the aim point add or subtract 6 from the drop number
drop number entered is 112 and your shot is 4 inches low
4x6=24 so your new drop number is 136
and if 4 inches high the drop number is 4x-6=-24 new drop number 88 so you now change the inputted drop number to the ones you have and shoot a few groups at 400 to confirm point of impact and aim point and adjust accordingly
Forgot to explain that the 112 drop number is the calculated drop for your round at 750 yards and that you are changing it by confirming the actual drop at 400 and the scope is calculating internally for 750

Apr 10, 2017 | Burris Optics

1 Answer

Where do i need to hit at with a 257 roberts at 200 yr with 117gr


You should be 3 inch's hi at 125 yards with the 117gr bullet which should put you 2 inch low at 270 yards. Or with a 200 yard zero you will be 2 inch's hi at 100 yards and a full 7 inch's low at 300. Kind of does not add up but has to do with the bullet rise at a 125yard +3 inch trajectory.

Sep 12, 2011 | Optics

1 Answer

How to use the BDC on my rifle scope



  1. Step 1 Take a rifle with a properly installed BDC bullet drop compensating reticle to a rifle range. Using ear protection zero the scope reticle so that the point of impact corresponds to the center of the cross hairs at the distance you have selected - typically 100 or 200 yds.
  2. Step 2 Determine the trajectory of the specific cartridge you have selected. There are several ways to do this. Ammo manufacturers publish trajectory and wind drift information. There are web based ballistic calculators like http://www.biggameinfo.com/BalCalc.aspx which will tell you how much your bullet drops at known distances.
  3. Step 3 Scope manufacturers like Leupold can be a valuable source of information about their reticle: "Leupold® Ballistic Aiming System: Boone and Crockett Club® Big Game Reticle aiming system provides a series of additional aiming points to improve your ability to shoot accurately at longer ranges. Nikon2_bing.gif also provides good information suggesting the marks on their reticle be used for zero at 100yds followed by circles below representing 200, 300, 400 and 500 yds if the cartridge travels around 2800 ft per sec. Nikon suggests the center cross hair be zeroed at 200 yds for magnum calibers traveling around 3000 ft per sec. We understant that each variation of different bullet weight and powder charge changes trajectory and a scope manufacturer can not build a different reticle for each different cartridge made so practice on the range to determine how well the marks relate to the actual impact of where your bullet strikes at a know distance is important. The one thing that people using BDC scopes typically have problems with is that a BDC scope has the reticle in the second focal plane of the scope. If the reticle was in the first focal plane of the scope the reticle would look smaller on low powers like 3x and grow proportionately larger as the power increased to say 9x top power. The problem is that while the marks on the BDC reticle correspond accurately to the bullet drop at the know distances 200, 300yds etc. What happens when you lower the power from the scopes maximum power to any other lower power is the reticle stays the same size and the field of view within the scope increases which means that the distance between these marks on the BDC reticle no longer corresponds to the point where the bullet will strike. In short BDC reticles only work at the maximum power of the scope or at a set specific power. At all other powers these BDC reticles do not accurately represent where the bullet will strike.
  4. Step 4 The center X always remains the same. If you zero at 100 yards and you know that your bullet drops 8 inches at 300 yards you could forget about the BDC marks and hold the center X 8 inches high - that works at any power 3x or 9x and should be used at lower powers. If you zero the center crosshair at 100yds and have the BDC scope at the maximum power 9X then the first line or circle below the center X should be the mark you place on the center of the 200 yard target----- the bullet strike should hit the center. If by some chance you put the scope on 3x and placed that first mark below the center cross hair on that 200 yard target you would shoot over the top of the target. This is because as the power of the scope decreases the field of view increases the angle increase and gets wider. You can experiment with known power settings and see at a specific power say 3x what that first circle down corresponds to and make notes because at any set power what the marks correspond to will be repeatable.
I got this from a website, hope it helps.

Apr 08, 2010 | Hammers Air Gun Rifle Scope 3-7x20 With...

2 Answers

My Weaver Classic riflescope is maxxed out for elevation


I don't think the tube holding the cross hairs will go up that high, and shimming the front base, I don't know. What you need is a new cross hair with the dots below the cross, They will raise your line of sight past the 350 zero. Or,,,,, just put the cross at the top of your target, 600 yards without the right scope is a long shot. I hope you have a heavy barrel target rifle in 308 or bigger. My M42 is unbelievable, but, It will shoot better than me all day long and I rarely go over 200 yards. I tried the 600 yard line once, didn't like it. Oh I could hit the target, but I like hitting doorknobs at 200 yards better. What are you shooting anyway? I hope your not trying to stretch out a 223 to the max.

Mar 01, 2010 | Bushnell BANNER RIFLE SCOPEPower: 3-9X40 /...

1 Answer

How do I sight this scope. If I set the center mil dot at zero at 100yards,where will the other dots be sighted using a 22/250 with 55 gr. bullets


I think the mildots only go so far, you have to do your homework on these things. Your 22.250 zeroed in at 100 yrds, velocity 3800, drops 7.4 inches at 300 yards, and 37 inches at 500 yards, so your mildots being set at x number of inches per dot, will not hit at 500 yards, your bullet is not enough. Even sighted in at 400 yards, the bullet drops 13.6 inches at 500 yards. But,,, with the same 400 yard zero, at 100,+4.7,200,+7.7,300,+6.6. That is about the flatest you'll get. And your mildots will be set likewise. You know they made the mildot scope for the trajectory of the 308. They changed everything for that bullet.

Jan 25, 2010 | Brunton FV62450-4 Fast Focus 6-24X50...

1 Answer

How to set my bushnell scope 3-9x40 for 200 yards


The Bushnell 3-9X40 has been around for quite some time in several forms, but it is pretty standard to set it like any other scope.

With the gun resting solidly on sand bags or something like a Lead Sled, shoot at a target with a 1" grid on it. Those targets are a free download at http://targetz.com/, but you have to browse to find them. Targets No: 10049 or 10058 are both usable, if you can see a 1" aiming point with a 9 power scope at 200 yards.

With a known point of impact (POI) at 200 yards, you can move the POI to where you want it (inside the caps at the center of the scope, there are adjusting screws or slots). The norm is 1/4" per click (the adjuster can usually be felt to click) at 100 yards or four 1/4" clicks for an inch. At 200 yards, the adjustment will be twice what it is at 100 yards or 1/2" per click.

Make your adjustments, using the grid on the target to tell you how many inches it needs to move, and shoot the target again to confirm the adjustment is correct. It's pretty standard to shoot at least a three shot group to ensure the bullets are reasonably close to each other.

Another method is to set the POI at a certain number of inches high at 100 yards and assume it's right at 200 yards. If the mid range trajectory, for your cartridge, at 200 yards is X inches high at 100 yards, you can set your POI to that X inches high and be pretty close at 200 yards.

Nov 07, 2009 | Bushnell Trophy 3-9x40 Rifle Scope, Matte...

2 Answers

I have a Bushnell Sprotiew 4x, 15mm scope mounted on a Mossburg .22 rifle. My shots are hitting left six inches and low. Can you please tell me how to adjust this scope? Thank you.


Keep in mind Diane this is for a set distance. if you are taking a shot at a target further than your are set for (ie a target you wont get 3 shots @) remember how the bullet is travelling as it goes down range

one idea would be to set your rifle up down range and zero it in on a target (preferably paper) now adjust 1 MOA (try and have target @ 100 yards and 200 yards)

see how far the bullet moves for each moa adjustment. then check it against the next range.

this should remain constant @ a set number of inches per 100 yards.

so if you zero in @ 100 yards and then move 1 moa any direction and it adjusts (lets say and hope it is 1.047 inches") then you do the same for 200 yards. it should be twice as much movement. ie 2.094"

once you know what 1 moa represents on your scope you can adjust alot more accurately.

REMEBER the total inches of movement / adjustment per MOA is directly related to range (a precise range helps in shooting) so if your squirrel is 150 yards and your first shot is off 9" to adjust you divide 9" by the inches per moa so 1.5 (150 yards /100) X (Inches per 100 yards per moa you measured hopefully 1.047") its 9" divided by 2x1.047 = 9" / 2.094 = 4.29799

this number needs to be rounded to the nearest click on your scope (most are 1/4 MOA scopes and you can tell by looking at how many clicks/lines are inbewteen each large number on your windage and elevation dials

so to turn this into an adjustment we round 4.29799 to 4.25 which is 4.25 MOA or 17 clicks on a 1/4 min scope.

GL and any questions just post and ill help

not please rate this as fixya :)

Note i can provide EXACT information that would allow you to determine range, and windage and elevation adjustments by looking through scope and estimating range
then factoring in weather variables. NOTE you hafta enjoy math or just want to know how to shoot really well. :)


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