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Heat Pump is automaticaly cutting off after 5 min warm up cycle

Heat pump displays a "High Refrigerant" on the screen after the 5 min cycle. it only goes into heat mode for about 30 sec, then the screen displays a the "High Refrigerant" and the unit shuts down and returns to the 5 min warm up cycle and this repeats itself indefinitaley and will not heat the water in the spa. New sand and the flow it perfect. 18lbs of pressure at the sand tank. Can anyone clue me in to what the fix might be? The Pool Tech.

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Hello,

There seem to be a problem inside the heater, there must have been a form of damage in the heater.

Try to troubleshoot it using the manual, That is opening it up and running a quick check on its components. The high refrigerant is simply showing there is a problem in the unit, so troubleshooting it will be the best solution for the heater.

Take care

Posted on Jul 10, 2010

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Why my heat pump only heat in emergency heat only,the condens is cutting off and on


It sounds like a maintenance issue with your heat pump, its clear that the unit is trying to run but one of the safeties is shutting it down trying to protect itself. most heat pumps are equipt with a High press lockout usually a manual reset ,a low press, cut out switch resets on rise of press automatically. Causes of LPCO Extremely dirty condenser coil or evaporator coil, Loss of fan on condenser, Low refrigerant charge. A competent Service man should be able to locate and correct this problem. A seasonal check up on the unit avoids these problems.

Feb 22, 2015 | GE Zoneline AZ38H12DAD Split System Air...

Tip

Why your unit is freezing up.


To understand why your AC or heat pump is freezing up, it helps to know how your system works.

There are 7 major parts to an AC system, 9 with a heat pump.

1 - Condenser/heat pump (The outdoor unit)
2 - Air Handler (the indoor unit unless the system is a package unit, then all is outside in one system. The air handler is usually found under the home, in an attic, or in a closet.)

In the condenser are the following major parts.

3 - Compressor
4 - Condenser coil
5 - Condenser fan
6 - (HPs only) reversing valve

In the air handler are the following major parts.

7 - Blower motor
8 - Evaporator coil
9 - (HPs only) electric heat strips

Some systems known as "dual fuel systems" use another heat source in place of the heat strips, usually a gas furnace. I will address gas furnaces in another post.

When an air conditioner is operating properly several things are taking place.

1 - The compressor is compressing or "pumping" refrigerant through the system.

2 - through changes in pressure, the refrigerant makes the evaporator coil get very cold, and the condenser coil gets very hot.

3 - The blower motor/fan circulates air across the evaporator coils, as the room temperature air (Also known as "indoor ambient") goes through the cold coil, it exits, cooled approximately 15 to 20 degrees cooler than when it entered. (In a ducted system, the blower is also the fan that circulates the air throughout the home.)

4 - The condenser fan circulates air across the condenser coils. As the outdoor air goes through the condenser coil, it removes heat from the coils that are very hot. This in turn removes heat from the refrigerant so it can run its cycle again, and through pressure changes, cool the evap coil.

5 - With a heat pump, the reversing valve reverses the flow of refrigerant in the condenser and evaporator coils.
In AC mode, the evaporator coils get cold, and the condenser coils get hot. But in heat mode, the evaporator gets very hot, and the condenser very cold.

Now, whichever coil is getting cold will freeze up if there is inadequate air flow across the coil, as the refrigerant in it is far below freezing, and there is not enough airflow to keep the humidity in the air from freezing on the coil.

Things that can cause poor airflow are,

1 - Dirty/clogged coils
2 - dirty/clogged filter (will only effect evaporator coil)
3 - Closed/blocked vents (will only effect evaporator coil)
4 - Malfunctioning or dirty fan

Low refrigerant will also cause a coil to freeze up, reduce efficiency and cause the system to run for long periods of time. Not to mention, shortening the life of the unit.

With a heat pump, in heat mode only, the condenser (outdoor) coil will routinely begin to freeze up in cold temperatures. This is due to the fact that the refrigerant is below freezing, and the cold outdoor ambient temp is not warm enough to keep the condensation in the air from freezing on the coil.

Note, a properly working AC should never freeze up.

A heat pump is equipped with defrost controls to prevent ice buildup.
Some are controlled by timers, some by temp.

When a HP is going into defrost mode, the condenser fan shuts down, the reversing valve reverses the flow of refrigerant and the once cold condenser coil now gets very hot, defrosting the coil. (Many people have said this process sounds like the unit is coming apart, or about to explode and are frightened by the "smoke" which is really just steam from melting ice that comes off the unit.)

During defrost mode, the secondary or "auxiliary" heat comes on to ensure that you are still getting warm air from the vents. (Again, this can be electric heat strips or a dual fuel system)

If you are experiencing cold air from the vents during defrost, that means your auxiliary heat is malfunctioning.

The auxiliary heat is used for three purposes.

1 - during defrost mode to maintain warm airflow (automatic)
2 - when the HP cannot maintain the set temp due to extreme outdoor temps. It comes on when the indoor temp drops several degrees below the set temp on the thermostat (automatic)
3 - For emergency heat source when the HP is not working. (Manual)

To recap....

Iced up coils?

Poor airflow
low refrigerant
Malfunctioning fan
failing defrost system


There are two things that can be done in a pinch to help de-ice frozen coils. This may get you by until the repairman can get there, or you can fix the system if you are a do-it-yourselfer.

HPs frozen outdoor coil in heat mode, not going into defrost?

Cover most of the vents, and turn the system onto cooling mode until the outdoor coil is thawed. then uncover vents and return to heat, or emergency heat. (this usually takes 15 min or less)

Frozen coils in AC mode with a heat pump?
Turn the system to heat with the thermostat on just high enough to get the system to come on. (again, usually takes 15 min or less to thaw.)

AC only, with frozen evap coils? (this can sometimes be seen frozen all the way outside to the compressor on the copper lines.)

Turn the system off, and the fan switch from "auto" to on".
This will usually defrost the coils within 1 to 2 hours.
(If your system has the furnace in line before the evap coil, turn the system to heat, and the furnace will defrost the coil within minutes.)



on Dec 25, 2008 | Carrier XHB123D X/Y Series Heat/Cool Air...

1 Answer

To continue from my last Question, to do with HVAC Evaporator/Condenser Cycles, how often should the System go into Heat Standby, Heat Defrost, and Heat Modes? What are Heat Standby and Heat Defrost?


In this type of system (heat pump), the evap and condenser swap functions by means of a reversing valve, according to the mode selected. Evaps throw off cool air, condensers, warm air. In heat mode, the condenser is the indoor coil and it throws off heat from the outside air. Vice versa for the cooling mode. Heat Standby would be whenever the temperature thermistor has reached set point by the user and shuts down the system. Heat defrost is the cycle that reverses refrigerant flow and defrosts the outdoor coil by sending warm refrigerant liquid to that coil. In heat mode, the outdoor coil builds frost and ice on its surface.

Feb 05, 2015 | Refrigerators

1 Answer

How to fix Fujitsu a1 error code for 15rls2 heat pump.


Try cutting power to the indoor and outdoor units for a couple of minutes. Restore power and see if the error returns. The A1 error for this line of units indicates high compressor discharge temperature, which translates to overheating outdoor unit.

If this error code remains after a hard power reset, it's time to pick up the phone. Either you have a refrigerant leak which has resulted in a loss of freon, or a blockage in the refrigerant plumbing that is backing up pressure in the system. Both conditions will require a major repair by an authorized service tech to get your heat pump up and running again. 25361378-awph1b3yhxdrnyqdcrsrelkr-4-0.jpg

Please mark my answer as helpful.

Jan 09, 2015 | Fujitsu 15RLS2 Halcyon Wall Heat Pump Air...

1 Answer

My Mistral MSS25 has stopped blowing hot air, it's only 6 degrees and it's friday afternoon before a long weekend! Is there anything I can do to fix it before someone can come out here next week to lo


No heat pump will put out much, if any at 6 degrees.
A heat pump is an air conditioner that reverses cycle via a reversing valve that re directs the refrigerant flow in the unit, in ac mode,
heat from indoors is rejected outdoors in the heat mode the heat from outdoors is rejected indoors.
The system does this by evaporating and condensing refrigerant.
For the refrigerant to be "boiled" or "change state" from a liquid to a vapor a temperature differential must exist, meaning the heat from the outdoor air must "boil" the liquid refrigerant.
For this to be possible the liquid refrigerant must be colder than the 6 degrees ambient or it will not boil anything.
For a refrigerant used for AC to be that cold the pressure will be in a vacuum for most refrigerants temperature pressure relationship.
Heat pumps below 40 degrees ambient outdoor temperature are
not effective, at this temperature outside drops a degree lower it further degrades the heat output .Power companies that finance Heat pumps typically will install an outdoor thermostat to prohibit the 2nd stage or electric heat strips from coming on until it is 40 or below outdoors, at a certain point well before 6 degrees a heat pump should be ran on the emergency heat mode which is the heat strips and the fan. Since 1500 Watt electric heaters are available at Wal-Mart for $20 the best alternative in this situation would be to buy a few of them.

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Jun 06, 2014 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Heat pump problems


Some heat pumps have high and low pressure swiches installed to keep compressor from running when unsafe conditions occur that can damage the compressor. If the outside fan is not turing on, the unit is cycling on high pressure, if you see ice forming on the big refrigerant line coming from the air handler, then the compressor is shutting down on low pressure. Low pressure can be cause by lack of air flow through air handler or from a low refrigerant charge.

Feb 13, 2014 | Intertherm Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

I just put in this new thermostat, I believe all the wiring to be correct i have one extra wire (brown) that should be a common wire used to keep the display lit. when I turn the unit on cool ( with the...


Heat pumps require specific heat pump thermostat. If you are trying to install a thermostat that is generic forget it. A heat pump is a diff animal than a central unit. Get the thermostat that matches your system. A generic won't cut it.

Aug 13, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Normal in cool cycle, very high pressure in heat cycle


Expansion valve on the condensor or possibly overcharged with refrigerant?

Nov 01, 2009 | Goodman Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

''does a new radiator need refrigerant added to it''


You need to replace the condensor, then take it to a shop to have the a/c system evacuated and recharged to purge moisture because the system was opened. That will cost around $150. You do not need to replace the receiver/dryer/suction accumulator even though they will tell you that you do.
go to car-part.com to find prices of condensor from salvage yards. Page with asterisk on it is the lowest priced part.

--------------------------------------
The Refrigerant Cycle
During stabilized conditions (air conditioning system shutdown), the refrigerant is in a vaporized state and pressures are equal throughout the system. When the A/C compressor (19703) is in operation it increases pressure on the refrigerant vapor, raising its temperature. The high-pressure and high-temperature vapor is then released into the top of the A/C condenser core (19712).
The A/C condenser core, being close to ambient temperature, causes the refrigerant vapor to condense into a liquid when heat is removed from the refrigerant by ambient air passing over the fins and tubing. The now liquid refrigerant, still at high pressure, exits from the bottom of the A/C condenser core and enters the inlet side of the A/C evaporator core orifice (19D990).
The A/C evaporator core orifice is the restriction in the refrigerant system that creates the high pressure buildup in the A/C evaporator core (19860) and separates the high and low pressure sides of the A/C system. As the liquid refrigerant leaves this restriction, its pressure and boiling point are reduced.
The liquid refrigerant is now at its lowest pressure and temperature. As it passes through the A/C evaporator core, it absorbs heat from the passenger compartment airflow passing over the plate/fin sections of the A/C evaporator core. This addition of heat causes the refrigerant to boil (convert to gas). The now cooler passenger compartment air can no longer support the same humidity level of the warmer air and this excess moisture condenses on the exterior of the evaporator coils and fins and drains outside the vehicle.
The suction accumulator/drier (19C836) is designed to remove moisture from the refrigerant and to prevent any liquid refrigerant that may not have been vaporized in the A/C evaporator core from reaching the A/C compressor. The A/C compressor is designed to pump refrigerant vapor only, as liquid refrigerant will not compress and can damage the A/C compressor.
The refrigerant cycle is now repeated with the A/C compressor again increasing the pressure and temperature of the refrigerant.
The A/C cycling switch (19E561) interrupts compressor operation before the external temperature of the A/C evaporator core gets low enough to cause the condensed water vapor (excess humidity) to turn to ice. It does this by monitoring low side line pressure. It is known that a refrigerant pressure of approximately 210 kPa (30 psi) will yield an operating temperature of 0°C (32°F). The A/C cycling switch controls system operation in an effort to maintain this temperature.
The high side line pressure is also monitored so that A/C compressor operation can be interrupted if system pressure becomes too high.
The A/C compressor pressure relief valve (19D644) will open and vent refrigerant to relieve unusually high system pressure.
Clutch Cycling Orifice Tube Type Refrigerant System 75cc8eb.gif
Item Part Number Description 1 19E762 A/C charge valve port (low side) 2 19E561 A/C cycling switch 3 19C836 Suction accumulator/drier 4 19703 A/C compressor 5 19D644 A/C compressor pressure relief valve 6 19D594 A/C pressure cut-off switch 7 19E762 A/C charge valve port (high side) 8 19712 A/C condenser core 9 19D990 A/C evaporator core orifice 10 19860 A/C evaporator core 11 — Low pressure vapor 12 — High pressure vapor 13 — Low pressure liquid 14 — High pressure liquid

  1. Connect the R-134a A/C Refrigerant Center to the low- and high-pressure service gauge port valves.
  2. Evacuate the system until the low-pressure gauge reads at least 99.4 kPa (29.5 in-Hg) (vacuum) and as close as 101.1 kPa (30 in-Hg) as possible. Continue to operate the vacuum pump for a minimum of 45 minutes.
  3. Turn off the evacuation pump. Observe the low-pressure gauge for five minutes to make sure that the system vacuum is held. If vacuum is not held for five minutes, leak-test the system, service the leaks, and evacuate the system again.
  4. Correctly oil match the system to verify that the correct amount of refrigerant oil is present in the system. For additional information, refer to Refrigerant Oil Adding in this section.
  5. Charge the system with the specified weight of refrigerant and refrigerant oil.
  6. When no more refrigerant is being drawn into the system, start the engine and select MAX A/C operation. Set the blower motor speed to maximum and allow the remaining refrigerant to be drawn into the system. Continue to add refrigerant into the system until the specified weight of R-134a has been added. Close the charging cylinder valve and allow the system to pull any remaining refrigerant from the hose. When the suction pressure drops to approximately 207 kPa (30 psi), close the charging hose valve.

May 14, 2009 | 1995 Nissan Maxima

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