Question about Canon 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III USM EF Lens

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Loose internal element 70-300mm i/s lens ,how to repair

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Do you have a lens collimator and the other equipment necessary to ensure lens alignment when you put it back together? Unless you do, take the lens in to an authorized Canon repair tech and have it done professionally.

Posted on Jul 08, 2010

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Disassemble, clean and reassemble Nikkor 85mm f1.4 AIS


Don't even think of disassembling it yourself!!!!!! Take it to a professional camera repair man and save yourself allot of money. I guarantee you that if you disassemble it yourself, you will not be able to reassemble it and the repair man will charge you much more then if you just brought him the lens in the first place.

Why do you think that the lens needs to be internally cleaned in the first place? It is very rare for so much dirt to penetrate the lens's interior that it actually affects the quality of the photographs. Don't over react to a few specks of dust between elements. The most important element to keep clean is the exterior surface of the rear element because that is where the light is most concentrated. Let a camera repair man tell you if your lens really needs such a drastic approach.

Dec 12, 2013 | Nikon Normal AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D...

1 Answer

One of the lens elements on my G5 has become detached & is just rattling around inside the lens assembly. Although I can't remember a recent event, it may have been dropped. Also, recently, the...


Sadly you are wasting your time as even if you can repair the lens element you lack the lens collimation equipment needed to set it up correctly.

By far the easiest, quickest and cheapest option is to sell your camera as a "spare or repairs" example and to use the funds towards another used example in good working order.

You have the added problem that when the lens did get stuck and you forced it free, you may have broken other internal lens parts. Even a professional repairer would not try to fix the lens assembly, they'd just order in a complete new lens assembly and fit that instead. The cost of the part alone, even without labour charges, will exceed the cost of buying another fully functional G5 privately.

Jun 18, 2011 | Canon PowerShot G5 Digital Camera

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I need to get a sigma 300mm f2.8 EX APO HSM lens (Nikon mount) fixed. I've already sent it in to Sigma's main referral center (C.R.I.S. in AZ), and they said they couldn't get a part to fix the...


Hi, I strongly doubt you would be able to fix it yourself. My suggestion would be to contact Gus Lazzari he seems to have access to a lot of camera and lens parts no matter how old they are.

Jun 10, 2011 | Sigma Cameras

1 Answer

I need to get a sigma 300mm f2.8 EX APO HSM lens (Nikon mount) fixed. I've already sent it in to Sigma's main referral center (C.R.I.S. in AZ), and they said they couldn't get a part to fix the...


Hi is it the 300mm or 120-300 you have a problem with if its the 300 what one is it ie 300mm 2.8 or 300mm 2.8 EX HSM or 300mm f2.8 EX DG HSM which element is it near the mount end or the front can you send a pic of the part you need

Jun 10, 2011 | Canon Sigma 120-300mm f2.8 EX APO HSM

2 Answers

I have a Sigma 400mm APO HSM Tele macro lens that I am most pleased with. It takes amazingly sharp pics, even wide open, that I am forced to do because I cannot get a re-chip done. My problem is that...


Sorry, but it's not a DIY fix as the lens will need to be collimated. Without this, you'll just be guessing the correct position and alignment for the loose optical element and won't get your image quality back.

Professional repair and re-collimation will not be cheap though and the lens may not fully recover its former sharpness, so it may be time to let your faithful friend go.

I hope my answer has assisted you in choosing a course of action; please take a moment to rate my reply.

Sep 25, 2010 | Sigma Telephoto 400mm f/5.6 APO HSM Macro...

1 Answer

Side out of image


I'm assuming in what follows that you've tried other lenses and only get the problem with this one lens. If you haven't, then it's essential to do this first unless the lens is obviously the problem. If it happens with other lenses then you have a damaged image sensor mounting within the camera body which will need professional attention.

This is a common problem on this particular lens. Normally it's due to the front element of the lens being slightly skewed on the lens barrel and most commonly occurs after the lens has been dropped.

Turn your lens to manual focus and focus to the shortest distance. Set the lens upright on a table and carefully view all around, if the problem is the front element it will lean slightly to one side like a miniature leaning tower of Pisa. If it doesn't, then check again with greater precision using a ruler to measure the distance s between the lens barrel and the focussing ring and a number of opposite points around the circumference. If they're anything but identical then the lens is skewed. If they are identical then the skewed element is buried deep inside the lens and will need professional repair as it's most likely a fault with the moving element used for image stabilisation.

If the tests confirm that the front element is skewed then if you're really careful and lucky you can often jiggle the front element using a firm twisting action back into place. It does take a bit of judiciously applied brute force and if unsuccessful you can make the problem worse, but either way if you don't try then the lens needs professional repair and new internal parts.

I've had this problem on about one of these lenses every month or so for the last year. The brute force repair works in about half the lenses I try it on and normally lasts. On the others a strip down repair usually shows the same range of broken/worn parts as I find on those lenses which clearly are too far gone to attempt the brute force method.

The difference is cost: the brute force repair costs nothing. The proper repair is often economically unviable as it often costs 50% to 70% of the cost of a brand new lens with a warranty.

Sep 05, 2009 | Canon 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 EF IS USM AF Lens

1 Answer

Dirt inside back lens element


The dirt has gotten onto the front element of the rear lens group. You do not want to try partially disassembling the lens to clean it. Either Tamron or a good camera lens repair technician should be able to perform what is called a partial internal CLA (cleaning, lubrication and adjustment) of just rear portions of the lens for fairly cheap. Alternatively you may be able to pick up a used Tamron 28-200 in excellent condition for less than the repair cost of your current lens. If successful, then you could turn around and sell your 28-200 for parts or sell it to someone who knows how to service it.

Aug 10, 2009 | Tamron 28-300mm f/3.5-6.3 DI XR for Canon

1 Answer

Lens jams when extending or retracting


This is either due to a cracked internal roller or a cracked/broken internal cam. The lens will have to be sent to Tamron for repair.

Apr 12, 2009 | Tamron 28-300mm f/3.5-6.3 Minolta Mount...

1 Answer

Loose internal lens


I would call bushnell at 800-423-3537 option 2 they are the ones that produced this.

Mar 16, 2009 | Optics

1 Answer

70-300 DL Sigma Macro Zoom lens element loosened, and then reset


amaizin, That's not really normal, because you might only normally hear a tiny noise if you shake a lens not mounted on the camera, but not loose glass sound, everything is fixed and solidly set for alignment when focusing if any element is loose it could never be able to get a clear focus and the element would be so scratched there would be all kinds of distortions even if it went "back into" place. You'll hear loose glass after you drop a lens on to the sidewalk or hard surface and an element is dislodged. Inspect the lens body for an impact mark a lightened portion in a ring shape where the metal or plastic has been stressed or the telltale signs of an abrasion from something like a hard rough surface such as concrete (a little group of pin **** on a corner). The lens should be inspected by a reputable shop to determine if it needs to be repaired or replaced. I take it that you were selling it to upgrade to another lens or other equipment. randy320sgi

Jan 29, 2009 | Cameras

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