Question about Audio Players & Recorders

Open Question

I have a Skytec pro 480 amplifier, after a short period of use the music produced looses all the bass & only the tweeters on the speakers produce any sound. This happens intermitently. I would appreciate any help

Posted by on

5 Suggested Answers

Benimur
  • 6966 Answers

SOURCE: karaoke speaker,no woofer or midrange working, only tweeter

Hi, it's probably that the 8" woofer and the midrange of the "amped" enclosure is open. One way to test is to remove just one wire from the inside of the enclosure to the woofer or midrange in question and with the use of a continuity tester (or a VOM), check for the resistance of the coil of each the 2 speakers. Both should read anywhere from 4-8 ohms, if there's no reading (VOM needle will not move) then the coil(s) are open. In the absence of a tester, a single AAA or AA battery would do (pls. some would argue that this is not a sound practice, however this should be enough for you to be able to determine the condition of the coil(s)). With the use of the battery and a single short length of electrical wire, apply power from the battery to the terminals of the speaker, if the cone moves, then chances are it is good, if they don't then you would have to replace it. Am not sure if available in your area, but there are some trained people who can rewind the coil should a replacement speaker be not readily available. Hope this be of help. Please let us know how things turn up. Regards.

Posted on Apr 15, 2007

SOURCE: crackling sound through speakers while watching dvd movie

Yamaha Rx-V361 Firmware Upgrade, A/V-Receiver/-Verstärker - HIFI-FORUM

Posted on Jun 18, 2008

SOURCE: Pioneer SX1980 Stereo Receiver/Amplifier. It

Hello there;
This might be painfully obvious but to be on the safe side check to see if the jumper pins are in the 'Main Out / Pre-In' jacks. If there is no jumper pins you found your problem. Second option, after turning on unit in a QUIET environment with the volume at the lowest setting do you hear a click coming from the inside? If yes, this is good. If no, you have problems.
give the guys at Innovative audio a call. They are the best place for vintage audio on the planet.
www.iavscanada.com
Good luck!

Posted on Jun 19, 2008

blueextc3221
  • 15935 Answers

SOURCE: which is a better tuning setup for good quality bass ?

The KAC-8401 has a bass boost switch. Be sure that is on +6dB setting.
Secondly, LPF (low pass filter) should be selected, with the crossover cutoff set to 60Hz.


Follow the instructions on this site for accurate tuning....
http://trussinme.com/Apps/audio/voltagecalc/default.asp



Manual For Download:
http://inform3.kenwoodusa.com/manuals/KAC8401.pdf

There is so much bad information and VOODOO going around the internet about how to set car audio amplifier gain controls that I thought I better write this. Gain controls on an amplifier are basically just small potentiometers (variable resistors) or volume controls if you will, that allow you to adjust the incoming signal to the amplifier so the amplifier works well with your headunit of choice or to match the level of other amplifiers in your system.
Its not rocket science to set the gains. Gains are like little volume controls, (I don't know why so many installers are taught that gains are NOT volume controls, when in fact that is EXACTLY what they are!) its super simple to just set them where the level sounds good to you.
With one amplifier its desirable to have a nice swing on your headunits volume control. Let me try to clarify this a little.
If we hook up a head unit with a 8volt (or more) output to an amplifier, then the volume will get loud very fast when we start to turn it up...In other words if our digital volume control goes from 1-30, then a HIGH VOLT output to an amplifier might make the amplifier reach full power at 5 on the volume scale... That kinda sucks cause it would be nice if you had a little more swing in your 1-30 range!
And by the same token a headunit with a LOW VOLT output might have to be turned up all the way to 30 and might still not quite drive the amplifier to full power... That sucks too!
A gain control in this case will allow you to adjust the amplifier so it allows the volume of a headunit to control the amplifier so it will get loud at a desirable point in the 1-30 swing... Usually about 3/4 the way up. We don't want it to get loud too fast as we wont have a good control as music levels differ. And we don't want it to have to be turned up all the way to get loud either, because since different music may be recorded at different levels if we set the gains for max output with one music source it might not get loud with a music source recorded at a lesser level.
So, by setting the gains so 3/4 turn of the headunits volume knob gets it LOUD gives you plenty of control and some extra above the 3/4 mark in case you get some music that's recorded at a lesser level...
To do this its easiest to do it by ear. No need to drag out the TEST TONES and OSCILLOSCOPES! They will do you absolutely no good.
One MYTH is how the gain controls will help to prevent amplifier distortion and amplifier clipping... That's simply not true, UNLESS you set the gains at a level where the headunit cannot possibly drive the amplifier to full power.. And even if you were to find this magic spot for your gain controls then (A) you would have to turn that volume control FULL SWING to get your system loud and (B) since many music sources (or disks) are not all recorded at the same level, its likely that if you have a disk recorded lower then you cant get it loud at all! and if you have a disk recorded louder then you can still surpass your magic spot... So in reality searching for this magic spot is fruitless! Dont waste your time...
In the early 80s when high fidelity car amplifiers were just starting to make the scene I worked with a pretty crazy installer that was kind of legendary around these parts... I wont mention his name but he was pretty highly respected at the time.. Well anyway, this crazy installer had heard that the amplifier gain control was to prevent amplifier clipping.. (still widely heard today).. Well this crazy installer set up EVERY CAR WE DID to the point where the gain control was so LOW that if you turned the head unit all the way up the amplifier WOULD NOT DISTORT.. And of course if you did turn the headunit all the way up the system would just be getting loud...
Customers would find that some cassettes would be recorded at a lower level and the music just wouldn't get loud enough... The Crazy installer would FLIP OUT and tell the customer that a REAL AUDIOPHILE doesn't want his music to distort or be that loud! The customers were NOT HAPPY and came to me to say "Gee Eddie, I don't want to make the other guy mad but can you adjust my system so it sounds good and please dont tell the other guy? Of course I said yes, and some of those customers from back in the early 80s are still my customers and they are sending sending their children to me for work as well.
SO, you see the only way the gains can be used to eliminate clipping or distortion will also limit your top end volume! And for most of us it is NOT DESIRABLE to do so.
As long as this is not done, it is just as possible to turn your system up to FULL power and beyond to clipping no matter where the gains are set....

Posted on Jan 01, 2009

  • 6 Answers

SOURCE: can't get audio from HD TV to run through Yamaha receiver speaker

be more specific!...how is the tv hooked up? hdmi, component, straight to the tv, or into the amp then tv?....what audio out? optical, digital? also what are you trying to view? local programming? cable/sat? dvd? your best bet is to ignore video on the amp and go straight to tv. can't help u more until i have more specifics.

Posted on Jan 23, 2009

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Fishman Loudbox amplifier rattle sound on bass notes


Either the speakers have loosened from the faceplate, or one or more have blown. Open the amp and tighten them down. If that doesn't fix it, remove them a take them to the nearest speaker repair shop for a checkup. If blown either have them re-coned or replace them.

Oct 06, 2016 | Fishman Loudbox 100 Acoustic Guitar...

1 Answer

No sound from tweeter bx5a


First of all, never connect the audio from your receiver directly to the tweeter. You can blow the tweeter instantly. The mid-bass driver can be damaged from a direct connection as well.

Since you get absolutely no sound from either driver, this seems to implicate the crossover. If the crossover has opened, no signal gets through, if it has opened early in the signal path.

But, it is also possible that a short exists, and that perhaps your amp cuts off the output having sensed a short. The short could be in the crossover or one of the drivers.

Here are some troubleshooting tips--

To prevent damage to your amp, turn it off while making or breaking any connections inside the speaker boxes.

Write down which wires get connected to which place on the drivers, so you can get them back where they belong.

With your amp turned off, connect the bad speaker to your amp. You've already verified that no sound is produced when both drivers are connected.

So, with your amp off, disconnect one wire from the tweeter in the bad box.

Briefly turn your amp on and listen for sound.

If you get sound, the tweeter is shorted.

If you get no sound, with the amp off, reconnect the tweeter in the bad box and disconnect one wire from the mid-bass driver.

Briefly turn the amp on and listen before turning the amp off.

If you get sound now, but not before, the mid-bass driver is shorted.

If you got no sound either way, check the DC resistance of the mid-bass driver (only, not the tweeter. Ohmmeters put out a small DC voltage to test resistance. That DC voltage might damage a tweeter, maybe. Don't risk it). Ohm the mid-bass driver while it is not connected to the crossover. If the driver is good, you should read some ohms--a little less than the stated impedance. An 8 ohm driver might read 6.5 ohms, for instance. If you get an open or a short (with the crossover disconnected from the mid-bass driver) you have a blown driver. Two actually, since neither the tweeter nor the mid-bass driver produced any sound in the previous tests.

If you can't get ahold of an ohmmeter, try this--

Open the good, working speaker and place the two side by side.

Connect your amp to the bad speaker box only.

With your amp turned off, disconnect the wires from the mid-bass driver in the bad box and connect them to the mid-bass driver in the good box. Disconnect one of the wires from the "good" mid-bass driver first, so you don't have two crossovers connected to it at the same time--even if only one of them will get powered on. It keeps the confusion down to a minimum when trying to isolate your problem. Oh, and disconnect one wire from the bad tweeter, in case it is shorted.

Turn the amp on and listen briefly before turning the amp off.

If you got sound, the "bad" crossover is fine, but the "bad" mid-bass driver is blown. And, since you got no sound in the previous tests, the "bad" tweeter is blown, as well.

If you got no sound, try it the other way around. Meaning--

With the amp off, disconnect the speaker wires coming from your amp from the bad speaker box and connect them to the good speaker box.

Your amp is now connected only to the good speaker box.

With the amp still off, connect the mid-bass wires from the good box to the mid-bass driver in the bad box. Remember to disconnect one of the "bad" crossover wires from its own driver first, so only one crossover is connected to the "bad" mid-midbass driver. Remember to disconnect one wire from the "good" and "bad" tweeters, so the only sound you hear--if any--is from the "bad" mid-bass driver, powered by the "good" crossover.

If this produces sound, but the previous attempts failed, you have a crossover problem.

If you still get no sound, something went wrong and you need to retest the good speaker by itself and back up a few steps and try again.

Assuming you got sound from the "good" crossover while it was driving your "bad" mid-bass, make sure no wires have come loose inside the "bad" box. Assuming you have sound connections at each end of each wire, you now need to desolder the electrolytic capacitors from the circuit board.

Make sure you mark them first, so you can put them back where they belong.

You can remove only one at a time, if that helps.

Use an ohmmeter to check some components.

The big red coil should read pretty close to a short, maybe one ohm.

The capacitors should read open or infinite resistance, although you might see a steadily increasing resistance while the capacitor charges up from the ohmmeter. If you read a steady low resistance on a capacitor after it has been removed from the circuit board, that capacitor is bad and must be replaced. The markings on the capacitor should give you some clues as to the proper replacement.

All things considered, I suspect that your problem is a shorted electrolytic capacitor. But, I gave you all I could think of so you can narrow it down and isolate the problem, whatever it might be.

I hope this helps.

Feb 23, 2011 | M-Audio BX5a Speaker

1 Answer

Only bass driver working on the pair. tweeter and mid range cones not working.


hi,
check the tweeter and mid range. its coil may become faulty.
for checking the speakers carefully remove the speakers one by one, remove its connections.
and check the speakers with a AAA cell. is it producing cracking sound. if not the speakers coils are burned.
ok

Feb 01, 2011 | Mission 782 Main / Stereo Speaker

1 Answer

Onkyo tx-sr601 bi wire with zone 2


SMCCARTY,
The idea behind bi-wiring speakers is to get the highest quality of sound by getting the sound from two separate sources doing separate jobs. Lower frequencies are harder for an amplifier to produce than higher frequencies. So it is common to give these frequencies to two different amplifiers so each can produce the highest quality of sound. By removing the low end from the top end amplifier, it provides the top end amp more headroom thus reducing the chances of clipping. Clipping can easily be heard from the tweeters destoying not only the sound but your speakers as well. It is common practice in pro and car audio to use separate amps for subbass, low, mid and high; four amps working together to their corresponding drivers (more or less depending on the system and type of audio being produced).

In your case, getting the two different sources from basically the same amp (power supply), would not accomplish the full intent of bi-wiring; it would just make more wiring for the same end result. However still a good thought on your end. Onkyo receivers are great because of their beefy power supplies. Not very many other brands have such strong power supplies. Denon's are close but not equal.
Chris-

Feb 14, 2010 | Onkyo TX-SR601 Receiver

1 Answer

Buzzing sound coming from the speaker at certain frequencies. more so when the bass is cranked. do i have to replace the speaker? or could it just be loose??


That is happening because your grounds went bad. Without grounds, then the amp will produce a buzzing sound. I would replace the input wire, that is probably the problem

Oct 11, 2009 | Fishman Loudbox 100

1 Answer

The sterero has no bass and the front speakers have no sound.


THE FRONT DOOR SPEAKERS AND THE BASS SPEAKERS ARE BRIDGED IN THE AMPLIFIER. I WOULD START THERE.

May 21, 2009 | 2005 Pontiac G6

1 Answer

Which capacitor or resister we use when connecting tweeter with subwoofer, or what do we connect to the subwoofer to get more bass ?


Hello johnwisam,

When using component speakers, it is normal to connect the head unit or amp outputs directly to the woofers and use a "high-pass" filter to the tweeters. Most component speakers sold as a set will include the correct filter along with wiring diagrams. The12volt.com web site shows examples of passive crossovers here.

Amps usually include built-in filters and a means of setting crossover frequencies according to the speakers attached. If the amp is connected to full-range speakers, it is set to "Full" or "BP". When used to drive subwoofer(s) only, the setting is most often "low-pass".

Most stock radios and aftermarket head units are relatively low power and just do not produce enough power output to drive subwoofers adequately. It takes more watts to move the larger cones and that usually means a separate amplifier.

Hope this helps.

May 03, 2009 | Car Audio & Video

1 Answer

I have an alpine head unit and a kenwood 1000 watt amp. I have two 12" subwoofers hooked up to the amp and thats it. I got my tweeters, and door speakers powered by my head unit. The bass was cutting in...


your amp may have burned out or try checking the fuse in the amp and the car also your channels may be burned or you may jus have water damage to the amp

Feb 18, 2009 | Kenwood KAC-7202 Car Audio Amplifier

1 Answer

Bi-amp


After examining a picture of a 5802 ( I have been servicing adcom for over 20 years ), these are not bi amp posts, but bi wire posts.

Bi-amp means that 2 amps are being used, one for highs, one for lows. This means that you have no crossovers in the speakers, instead, you have an electronic crossover between the amps and the pre-amp. The highs and lows are separated in the electronic crossover. One amp handles the lows, one handles the highs.

Bi-wire means that you have the crossovers still inside the speakers. The amp handles the full range of music ( highs-mids-lows ). Different kinds of speaker wire produce different results. If you have bi-Wire terminals on your speaker, they come with shorting wires, that tie the tweeter + to the woofer + on the back of the speaker, and the tweeter - to the woofer - . When the shorting wires are removed completely, you have now electrically separated the tweeter and woofer from each other, while maintinaing the crossovers ( inside the speaker ) for each.When this is done, you can now bi-wire the speakers and amp, and use different kinds of wire for the lower frequencies and the upper frequencies, depending on your ears ( everyone hears a little differently, thats why there are so may makers of components, and wire ).

Why do we have crossovers?.....the tweeter voice coils ( the things that make the sound ) are made of hair thin wire. This wire cannot handle much power and if you were to put bass in to a tweeter, you would burn the tweeter out almost instantly. A tweeter is a very light, fast moving device which can react very quickly to high frequency sounds ( symbols, triangles, guitar strings....). Woofers are more rugged. They have voice coils made of heavier wire and are designed for larger movements that Bass demands. Subsequently, woofers aren't very good for high frequencies because they are slower devices.

So what do we do ?.....Keep the lows away from the tweter and the highs away from the woofer.....thats the job of the crossover.

In the event that your speaker has the crossover OUTSIDE the speaker box, you should check ( as always ) with the manufacturer of the speaker to see how it can be changed to suit your needs. Remember to always read and follow your owners manual. Good luck....Rob

Feb 22, 2008 | Audio Players & Recorders

Not finding what you are looking for?
Audio Players & Recorders Logo

Related Topics:

56 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Audio Players & Recorders Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

101544 Answers

 Grubhead
Grubhead

Level 3 Expert

4751 Answers

The Knight
The Knight

Level 3 Expert

71635 Answers

Are you an Audio Player and Recorder Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...