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I have a old Asus p4s333 motherboard with a usb 1.0 card that is bad. It has a ribbon connector. Where can I get a replacement.

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Try www.asus.com and see if they have a list where you can buy their products. Cards with ribbons aren't very common, so you may not be able to find one at all. But I would go to their website and search there, and if nothing turns up, call their support line.

Posted on Apr 17, 2008

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P6610f motherboard


Are you following Anti-Static Procedures?

If you, or the person who took it apart has not, you can use the motherboard for a Frisbee.
(Processor for a neck trinket, and Ram Memory for Christmas decorations)


Moving on.........

HP Support > Pavilion p6610f Desktop PC > Main Support page,

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/product?cc=us&lc=en&dlc=en&product=4299342

Product information > Product specifications > Motherboard Specifications, N-Alvorix-RS880-uATX (Alvorix),

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c02560084&tmp_task=prodinfoCategory&cc=us&dlc=en&lc=en&product=4299342

A) Let's start with the two power cables coming from the Power Supply, that go to the motherboard;

1) 24-pin ATX main power cable

Looking at the motherboard photo, the 24-pin ATX main power cable's connector; is at the bottom.
Two rows of 12 socket holes, in a yellowish/whitish connector.

Motherboard installed in computer case, you will find it to the Right.

(The motherboard view shown, is clocked 90 degrees to the Right; in comparison to how it actually sits in the computer case)

GENERAL example,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

[NOTE* Color of connector does NOT matter ]

Note the hinged Lock Clip on the power cable's connector.
Also the TAB on the motherboard connector.
When power cable is deemed to be plugged in tightly, and properly; the Lock Clip will be over the Tab.

{Lock Clip operates on the same principle, as a see-saw on a playground. Top is squeezed in to release Lock Clip}

2) 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable

Looking at the motherboard photo, the motherboard connector for this power cable is;
Straight up from the white Processor socket,
To the right of the square finned Aluminum Heatsink.

General example of said power cable, and it's respective connector on the motherboard,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

Has a Lock Clip too.
Remember about the color of connector, thing.
Can be pink with neon polka dots. Doesn't matter.
WHAT the power cable IS, does matter.

This power cable is power for the Processor.
It ain't plugged in, you have no computer.

(Scroll down to Motherboard Layout. It is PU521 )

That's it for power cables that plug into the motherboard.
Moving on..........

The Harddrive is a SATA unit. The optical drive is a SATA unit.
(CD/DVD drive)
Means you need a SATA power cable for each one of them.
General example,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#sata

Note the L-shaped opening in the connector. Hard to see in this photo, but I will show a better view in a minute.

Also; between a SATA data cable's connector, and a SATA power cable's connector; the SATA power cable connector is the larger of the two.
Has 15 contact pins.
SATA data cable connector has 7-pins.

Often there is a lock on this power cable's connector.
A tab that sticks up, or a 'bulb' type affair.
Depress with thumb, when plugging in, or unplugging.

Harddrive needs a power cable, and data cable.
So does optical drive/s.

B) General example of a SATA data cable, and it's respective connector,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:SATA_ports.jpg

Just referring to the cable shown at the top, for now.
Now you can see the L-shaped opening a little better.
See how the 'foot' of the L goes down? That is the direction you want it, when plugging in.

The motherboard connector shown below the SATA data cable, is a SATA connector.
This particular style is OPEN.
Your motherboard uses the type that is CLOSED.
Note also the L shape on the motherboard connector.

The connector shown for that SATA data cable, is a 90 degree bent elbow.
If your SATA data cables have this style of connector, they plug into the Harddrive, and optical drive/s.

The straight type of connector, plugs into the motherboard.
It can also plug into the Harddrive, and optical drive; if your SATA data cable has two straight connectors.

The SATA data cable connectors on your motherboard, are all the way to the Left. (In the motherboard photo)

Orange, Light Blue, Dark Blue, and White.
Note that they have a L shape in the middle.

Now scroll down the HP Support page, to Motherboard Layout.

Orange = SATA4
Dark Blue = SATA1
Light Blue = SATA3
White = SATA2

SATA1 is for the Harddrive
SATA2 is for an optical drive.
If you have more than 1 optical drive, it plugs into SATA3.

(Make sure SATA3 is ENABLED in BIOS Setup)

C) The front of your computer is the Front Panel.

The area of contact pins on the motherboard, that the Main wires from the Front Panel go to; is the Front Panel header.

Looking at the motherboard photo, look again at the Orange SATA4 connector. To the Immediate RIGHT is the Front Panel header,

http://www.findlaptopdriver.com/n-alvorix-rs880-uatx-front-panel-motherboard/

I believe though, that the cable coming from the Front Panel; has one solid plug-on connector. Not individual wires.

Note how the Front Panel header on the motherboard, is missing one pin. This is the Key.
The cable connector going to it, should have one socket hole blocked off.

Should only be one cable coming from the Front Panel, that has the correct plug-on connector.
The other cables coming from the Front Panel, will have different size plug-on connectors.

Going further.........
Look at what is installed in the Front Panel;

USB ports, audio ports, (Headphone and Microphone), Card Reader, etc.
You can follow the cables, and get a pretty good idea of where they go, in the Front Panel.

For example you can follow the cables that go to the USB ports.
Follow the two cables that go to the Card Reader.
Follow the cables that go to Microphone, and Headphone jacks.

Then by process of elimination, you know which cable goes to the Front Panel header.

D) Front Audio
Looking at the motherboard photo, look towards the Top/Left corner.
The Yellow header is for the Front Panel audio ports.
Headphone, and Microphone.

E) Coming down the Left side, in the motherboard photo; look at the two White rectangular headers.
Match up in the Motherboard Layout, and bottom of HP Support page.

USB1 2, and USB1 2.

EACH USB header, is for TWO USB ports.

That is why they both have USB1 2 marked near them, in Motherboard Layout.

A Card Reader SHOULD use two cables, and One USB header.
It may be though, that the Card Reader will use both of those White USB headers.

Either the Card Reader plugs into them, or the USB ports in the Front Panel.
If the cable connector fits, plug that cable in. (On)

USB is USB.
Card Reader uses USB too.

Point?
If the cable's connector fits, plug it in. (On)

In the motherboard photo, there are two White connectors;
Above the Orange SATA4 connector, and Below the Light Blue, and White SATA connectors.
(Light Blue = SATA3, White = SATA2)

The USB ports up front probably connect to them. (Front Panel)
Follow the cables to Front Panel USB ports.
What type of connector do the cables use?

All FOUR of those USB connectors on the motherboard, may NOT be used.
Perhaps just two of them.

That doesn't 'sound' very concise, huh?
However it is my contention, that each cable coming from the Front Panel; should have a different connector.

Going further;
The Card Reader, and the USB ports in the Front Panel; may have the SAME type of connector, on the end of their cables.

Again, the Card Reader uses a USB header, (Or headers), on the motherboard.
So do the two USB ports in the Front Panel.

Therefore it does not matter which USB header on the motherboard, that either one of them are connected to.

F) Looking at the motherboard photo, look above the Ram Memory slots, to the far Right.

Right above ram memory Slot 1, that is White in color. (DIMM 1)
There is a small Electrolytic Capacitor, with a Black plastic sleeve.
Right above it is a small White 3-pin connector.

This is where the Processor fan plugs in.
(CPU_FAN)

G) Right above the square Aluminum finned Heatsink, is the 3-pin connector for the computer case fan.
SYS_FAN
(System Fan)

(The square Aluminum finned Heatsink, sits on the Northbridge chip.
Which is part of the motherboard chipset)

That about does it for me.
Please post additional questions in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

[Seems like I gave a solution for this before.
I can't pull it up in Solutions I have given, so do not know for sure.

Want to see someones user account?
If you are a member of FixYa, all you have to do is click on their user name (Example; joecoolvette), or user icon ]

Mar 23, 2013 | HEWLETT-PACKARD Hewlett Packard Pavilion...

1 Answer

Were to connect the power switch to an emachines t3642


My intel tells me this is the motherboard for an eMachines T3642 Desktop PC,

http://www.ebay.com/itm/GATEWAY-EMACHINES-W3644-MCP61SM2MA-4006232R-MOTHERBOARD-T5246-T3646-T3642-S3649-/330737918167?pt=Motherboards&hash=item4d018420d7

If this holds true,

http://support.gateway.com/s/MOTHERBD/Shared/4006232R/4006232Rnv.shtml

In the list click on the blue - Product Views

The Ebay link shows you where the letters, of the above Gateway link, are on the motherboard.

1) B - Auxiliary 12 Volt ATX connector.
This is where the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable plugs in,

Example of power cable from Power Supply,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

Power for the Processor (CPU) Do NOT forget it.

2) E - Main Power Connector

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

Note* Color of connectors for 1) above, and 2), do NOT matter.
What the connector is, Does.

Note also that there is a pivoting Lock, on both power cable connectors.
The matching motherboard connector has a Lock TAB.
When the power cables are deemed to be plugged in tightly, and correctly; the Lock's hooked end will be over the Lock Tab.

[Squeeze the top of the Lock in, to release. Release when removing.
The Lock works on the same action as a seesaw on a playground ]

3) F- Floppy Disk Drive Connector
A 34 wire thin ribbon IDE cable, connects here on the motherboard, and plugs into the back of the Floppy Drive. The cable is the Data cable.

The power cable that goes to it is a 4-pin Small peripheral power cable. Looks like this example,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#floppy

IF a Memory Card Reader, (Media Card Reader. Same/same) is used instead; it will use the SAME power cable.

The data cables are different though. They connect to a Front USB header on the motherboard, and are a rounded cable.

ONE of the Front USB headers on the motherboard, will be used for the Card Reader.
Click on S - USB 2.0 Connectors

[NOTE* In EACH USB header are provisions for attaching to TWO USB ports. Front OR back of computer.
One will be used for the TWO data cables, going to the Card Reader. Which one? Pick one.
BIOS will set up a new Interrupt Request for it. (IRQ) ]

G - Parallel ATA IDE Connector
40 wire flat ribbon data cable goes here. (ONLY 39 wires are actually used, though)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:PATA-cable.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:ATA_cables.jpg

Now I'm going to get a little lengthy, and detailed;

In the first link immediately above, PATA-cable.jpg
See the two small 'ribs' on the Top/Middle of the connector?
(May just be one solid block, also)

That is a Locating Lug. When you plug the connector into the motherboard, it lines up with a Cutout in the motherboard connector.
IF there is NO Locating Lug;
Look at the side of the cable that has the faint Red stripe.
This Red stripe is on the SAME side as Number 1 wire.

When plugging into the motherboard connector, the side of the cable that has the Red stripe, goes DOWN. Down towards the Bottom of the motherboard.
Number 1 pin in the motherboard connector, is at the Bottom of the motherboard connector.

If no Locating Lug when plugging into a device; Harddrive or Optical Drive, (CD/DVD drive);
The side of the flat data ribbon cable that has the Red stripe, goes towards the POWER CABLE pins, on the device.

Let's look at an IDE (PATA) harddrive, and the 4-pin Peripheral power cable that plugs into it;

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

See where the power cable plugs in? The Red stripe on the IDE flat ribbon cable, will be next to the power cable.
Also can be said as, when the IDE flat ribbon cable is plugged into the Harddrive, the Red stripe will be on the Right.

Same with an Optical Drive.

You MAY have an optical drive's flat data cable plugged in here.
IF it is an IDE (PATA) optical drive.
MORE than likely though, your Harddrive is a SATA unit, and plugs into a SATA connector on the motherboard.

U - SATA Connectors
Note there are two. SATA1 and SATA2.
The Harddrive is supposed to plug into SATA1.
The beauty of SATA is though, that you can plug the Harddrive into SATA1, OR SATA 2.
BIOS will find the device.

This is an example of a SATA data cable, and it's connector,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:SATA_ports.jpg

(Your SATA connector on the motherboard, is different than the example shown)

Between a SATA data cable's connector, and a SATA power cable's connector; a SATA power cable connector is the Larger of the two.
A SATA data cable connector has 7-PINS.
A SATA power cable connector has 15-PINS.

Note also the L-shaped opening. This lines up with an L-shape on the Harddrive connector, or an Optical Drive connector. (Data cable connector)
Note also that a SATA power cable has this same L-shaped opening.

More to follow in a Comment.
Regards,
joecoolvette

Feb 17, 2013 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Graphic card location inside an E520


The Dell 520's manual can be downloaded here. The PC's motherboard optionally has a VGA Video Connector (integrated) as shown on Page 1 of the manual. If yours is equipped with this option, there is no graphics card installed - it is built into the motherboard itself. It can not be removed or separated from the PC.

Your PC may have a a separate video card installed into one of the expansion slots on the motherboard. Page 1 also shows this installed below the USB 2.0 connectors as the PCI Express graphics card.

Here's an internal view:
4_17_2012_1_20_10_pm.jpg

The video card in the picture is driving two standard analog VGA monitors (blue cable connectors) through a DVI -> VGA adapter (white and clear devices) this is connected to the video output connectors. If you look closely at the edge of the PC in the picture (directly above the USB & network cables) you should be able to see an unused VGA Video Connector (integrated). Most computer BIOS systems will automatically disable any built in video capabilities of the motherboard when a separate video card is detected. Check the manual for additional info about these BIOS settings.

I hope this helps & good luck!

Apr 17, 2012 | Dell Dimension E520 PC Desktop

1 Answer

Removed power cord from back of pc and after plugging it back in I suddenly had no power. Replaced original power supply (Bestec 300 W 24 pin main connector) with a new Dynex 400W 20+4 pin and still...


Before calling it quits on the motherboard, try disconnecting ALL non-essential devices from the motherboard.

This includes drive cables, all slot mounted cards, etc.

Leave the processor and ram in place. Make sure ALL power cords from the power supply to the motherboard are properly plugged in. Some power supplies have 2 cords to the motherboard, a large plug and possibly a separate 4 pin that plugs in near the CPU. After checking your plugs, see if the board will power up. If so, you should get some beeps or status lights. If not, then it is likely the board has failed. Since you have replaced the original power supply, (assuming the replacement is compatible), it is not likely you have 2 bad power supplies.

If the board DOES power up, then plug in 1 internal device at a time to determine what might be "killing" the boot. A bad hard drive or DVD/CD drive can cause this as well as a shorted USB or firewire device.

Nov 28, 2010 | Gateway 507GR PC Desktop

1 Answer

Bootup prob with M2N68-AMPLUS with AMD 7750 CPU. It has a


A couple of things that could be causing this.
Have you tried plugging straight into a wall outlet rather than the UPS to see if you have the same problem? If plugging into the wall fixes it, you have a bad UPS.
Next, have you tried replacing the power supply? It could be that your power supply is either failing or underpowered for your PC components, especially if you have upgraded something like your video card.
It could be an overheating problem. Download the SpeedFan application (freeware...search Google for "speedfan") and look at your system temperatures. If they have the little fire icon next to them, check which component is having the problem. Replace or upgrade the fan for that component. If it's ambient case temps, additional intake and/or exhaust fans may help.
Upgrade all of your PC's drivers and firmware (available through Asus' website).
Remove all external, unnecessary devices (leaving just your mouse, keyboard, and monitor).
Last option could be failing components. Since you said you upgraded your RAM and HDD, that leaves power supply, video card, CPU, and motherboard. If possible, swap these out with another PC's parts. If not possible, I would start with power supply, then CPU, then video card, and then motherboard.

Aug 21, 2009 | ASUS PC Desktops

1 Answer

Installed a new Optical Drive and require assistance in the wiring


What kind of optical drive? Is this a CD, DVD?, Blue ray,
or an opto-ferro-magnetic floppy?

Generally:

1) External drive:
============
a) just power it up and connect it to the PC using an USB
or firewire (1394) cable. If it is USB, make sure your PC
is set up for USB-2 which is astronomically faster.

b) The windows operating system should automatically
detect it and install the low level device drivers.
Then you can run the installation driver CD that came
with the drive.

2) Internal drive:
==========

a) Shut down Windows from the START menu,
chose shut down the system, NOT restart.

b) When it finishes shutting down, turn of the
power at the back (!) of the PC and unplug
the power cord.

Now turn the power switch back on for a few
with the cord unplugged, then shut it off again.

This will drain any internal capacitors inside the
power supply to make sure you don't fry anything
while you poke around.

c) Open up the computer case and look to see where
the other hard drives are installed and physically
mount the new optical drive inside the case.

d) Locate a spare power cable coming from the power
supply (Black, Red and Yellow wires) and hook it
into the back of the drive.

It should only fit one way, but there are several
different kinds of connectors, depending on the
drive type, so you may need an adapter cable.

i) Large 4 pin connector = Red, Yellow, Black, Black
ii) Miniature -//- = -//-
iii) SATA power cable = Small black hooked beastie.

Also make sure the power supply can handle
the extra current, this depends on the other stuff
such as drives and video card you already have in
the machine.

If your power supply is less than 600W on a modern
machine, now may be the time to upgrade it.

I have two video cards, 8 hard drives and a DVD,
so I had to upgrade to a 1000W to prevent my
system from randomly crashing during boot up,
when everything spins up for a self-test.

e) Once the power is connected, you need to connect
the data cable, which comes in a least 3 different
types:

IDE or PATA = Parallel ATA ribbon cable

SATA = Serial ATA cable, small flat cable with a red,
blue or orange jacket, and small black
hooked connectors at each end.

Note that these are a different size and
shape from the SATA power cables.

SCSI = pronounce scuzzi, no longer common.

One end of this data cable connects to the back of the
optical drive, the other to the motherboard, but this is
where it gets more complicated, because the mother
boards are fussy about which slot you plug them into.

You need to follow your motherboard manual here (HP) !

For SATA cables, you have to make sure that the motherboard
can handle them, older motherboards cannot, requiring an
adapter card. Also many of the new motherboards offer
multiple drive configurations such as RAID.

=============================
RAID = Redundant Array of Independent Drives:
RAID 0 = STRIPE for high speed at the cost of security
RAID 1 = MIRROR for data redundancy at the cost of $ cost
RAID 01 = Stripe of mirrors
RAID 10 = Mirror of stripes
RAID 5 = Stripe with parity compromise
etc...
=============================

Anyway, the problem is that on these mother boards some
of the SATA connectors are general purpose (which is what
you need), while others are not (i.e dedicated RAID),

and you may have to change jumpers on the board
or BIOS settings to get it to work right.

Also if the optical drive is to be bootable, then it sould
be connected to SATA1 or SATA2, but that again depends
on the motherboard and the BIOS boot sequence settings.

===

With the older style IDE or PATA drives, which includes most
optical drives (since SATA is fairly recent), most motherboards
provide two separate IDE ports, each of which can handle a
pair of drives for a total of four.

IDE1, Master = Drive 0
IDE1, Slave = Drive 1
IDE2, Master = Drive 2
IDE2, Master = Drive 3

Each pair of drives shares a single ribbon cable.
Older cables have 40 conductors,
Newer cables have 80 conductors for UDMA.

While the end connectors are the same, only 40 conductors,
the 80 conductor cables have interlaced grounding, which
allows them to transfer data at a higher speed.

Older optical drives used the 40 conductor, newer ones
use the 80 conductor, but there is no harm done using
the 80. If the ribbon cable came with the optical dive,
you can use it if you are plugging it into a separate IDE
port, BUT

Never use a 40 conductor ribbon cable if it is shared between
the optical and the hard drive, because this will slow down
the hard drive to the lower UDMA speed.

Now about the Master Slave thing:
=========================
1) Each PATA=IDE port can only handle one master/ slave pair.

2) You must never connect two MASTERS or two SLAVES
to the same cable.

3) The boot hard drive must be a MASTER on IDE1
for most systems, unless the BIOS has a way
remapping them.

4) When a hard drive and an optical drive share the same
IDE port and cable, the hard drive should be the MASTER,
for maximum speed, optical drives are often slower.

5) IDE hard drives and optical drives use a set of
jumpers near the IDE connector to determine if they
act as a MASTER or a SLAVE. This should be set before
you install them, because it is very hard to get at the
jumpers afterwards:

MASTER this forces the drive to act as a MASTER
SLAVE this forces the drive to act as a SLAVE

CABLE SELECT special color coded ribbon cables
(80 conductor) must be used to make this work.
These now come with most new motherboards.

The blue connector at the far end of the cable, away from
the other two goes into the motherboard.

The black connector at the opposite end (near the gray one)
goes into the MASTER drive.

The gray connector in the middle goes to the SLAVE drive.
(both drives should be setup as CABLE SELECT for this to
work)

When connecting the ribbon cable to the IDE drive, make sure
the PIN 1, the marked side of the ribbon goes near the power
connector. On the mother board, the marked of the ribbon
connector goes into PIN 1. The connector should be keyed
to only fit one way, but don't count on it.

Hope this get you started,

Martin

BTW please rate my answers.

Jun 14, 2008 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Narly


  1. Clean cooling components that have become clogged with dust. If beeping persists, continue to the next step.
  2. Remove a memory module. If the PC stops beeping, the memory module may be bad, is the wrong type of memory for the motherboard, or was not fully seated/connected. Try reseating the memory into the socket to see if a connection was the problem, otherwise replace the module. Remove each memory module, replacing the one that was previously removed. Once all modules have been checked, if beeping persists, continue to the next step.
  3. If your computer has a graphics card, remove it. If the beep code changes or continues with the same beep pattern, the video card may still be good. reseat the video card into its socket and continue to the next step. If the beep code goes away, the video card may be bad. Try reseating the video card, making sure it is fully locked into the connector on the motherboard. If problems persist, replace the card.
  4. Remove a PCI card. If the beep code goes away, the card may be bad. Try reseating the card into its connector on the motherboard. If problems persist, replace the card. Remove each PCI card, replacing the one that was previously removed. Once all cards have been checked, if beeping persists, continue to the next step.
  5. Disconnect hard drives and CD/DVD drive cables (IDE/ATA) from the motherboard socket. If the beep code goes away, the cable or socket is probably bad. Look for bent pins inside the IDE socket on the motherboard and straighten any bent pins. Try reseating the cables into the connectors. If problems persist, the drive itself may be bad and may need to be replaced. Disconnect each drive cable, replacing the one that was previously disconnected, until all have been checked. Once all connections have been checked, if beeping persists, continue to the next step.
  6. At this point, the problem probably involves the motherboard or processor. Make sure any jumpers on the motherboard have not fallen off their pins and into the case. Make sure jumpers are set correctly.

Jun 09, 2008 | HP Pavilion 8860 (P2941A) PC Desktop

1 Answer

I am building a video editing computer around the Matrox RT.X2 HD capture card. The motherboard is an ASUS P5K3 DELUXE WIFI-AP, I am installing this Mother board inside of an Antec Titan 650 case. I don't...


Look up the motherboard manual that came along with the motherboard pack. It has to be there or else look up a website pertaining to the said motherboard model.

May 05, 2008 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Ribbon hook-up


You should be using two, two connector IDE ribbon cables if I understand your questions correctly.

On IDE 0 you connect the hard drive and one cd drive.
On IDE 1 you connect the second cd drive.

You will need to make sure the jumper settings on the drives are correctly set.

Jan 02, 2008 | PC Desktops

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