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Installation of family tree maker 2008

I installed on my laptop with windows xp no problem; tried to install on my new pc with vista and get error messages...won't install

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Hi,
I have FTM software I wanna use this on my own server. How can I do this? I've my own website developed in .Net.
Thanks

Posted on May 15, 2008

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  • 166 Answers

Hello there.

Please navigate to this link http://www.familytreemaker.com/Support/Patch.aspx

Your software requires additional updates to make it function on Windows Vista. Please download and install the update from the address provided, following the instructions.

Hope this helps.

Posted on Apr 16, 2008

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Cdrs368, old software cannot use on Windows 7


You may be able to install and use your CDRS368 (Family Tree?) software if you install it in compatibility mode for Windows XP with Service Pack 3.

You get to the compatibility setting by opening the Properties of the program installer (right click on the main installer executable file, then select the Compatibility page tab).

1_3_2012_11_01_32_pm.jpg

Jan 03, 2012 | Microsoft Office Computers & Internet

1 Answer

What drivers do I need to make Family tree maker Compatible with Windows 7


Start the Windows "Program Compatibility Wizard".
Tell it that you want to install a Windows XP application from CD-ROM.
Windows 7 will create a "wrapper" around the software, to make it think that it is running under Windows XP.

Nov 20, 2010 | Encore Family Tree Maker Version 16 Full...

1 Answer

Does not install on 64bit systems


Please read the System Requirements Carefully.
60-day trial does not include technical support and requires the following:
  • PC with 300 megahertz or higher processor clock speed.
  • Windows Vista® with 1 GB RAM, Windows® XP with 256 MB RAM, Windows Server® 2008 with 512 MB RAM or Windows Server 2003 with 256 MB RAM -> (64-bit versions of Windows XP and Windows Server excluded); service packs for operating systems recommended.
  • Certain features require Internet Explorer®. If not present, Internet Explorer will be installed but will not displace your primary browser.
  • Available hard-disk space: 1.8 GB (some users may require up to an extra 300 MB).
  • For installation of software: DVD drive or high speed Internet access.
  • Super VGA (1024 x 768) or higher resolution monitor.
  • Microsoft Mouse, Microsoft IntelliMouse®, or a compatible pointing device.
Thats the System Requirements for the Trial Version. I am not sure whether you are running Windows Vista or Windows 7. You cannot install this on WINDOWS XP/Windows Server 2003 which have 64BIT Architecture.
Same applies for the 2009 Version as well.
You can update it to work with Windows 7 from here. You can update it to work with Windows Vista from here. Search by the Name under Software category.
Feel free to contact me if you need further instructions. Please be kind enough to Rate the answer as well with a comment if it solved your issue.
Thanks for contacting Fixya!

Jun 11, 2010 | Microsoft Streets and Trips 2008 for PC

1 Answer

Im instaling windows xp in Acer Aspire but it


latest laptops do not have compatability
with xp. if you want to install xp you will have to use third party software for accessing hdd & installing XP

Nov 09, 2009 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional for PC

1 Answer

Family Tree Maker 2006 will not export .pdf file


Try this out, could have a problem with your PDF printer drivers:

  1. Use the following link to download the Primo PDF printer (it uses Adobe). http://www.download.com/PrimoPDF/3000-10743_4-10264577.html?part=dl-10264577&subj=dl&tag=button
  2. After downloading and installing the Primo driver, it will be listed as an available printer in your Printers and Faxes window. Right-click on the driver and hit SET AS DEFAULT PRINTER
  3. Now that the default driver has been changed, load Family Tree Makeragain and try to printer
Try that out let me know,

Oct 21, 2009 | Encore Family Tree Maker® Standard 2006...

2 Answers

When i switch on a box comes on in centre of screen saying "an unhandled exception has occured in application"I cant remove it as it wont close (have to switch off at switch) new surfer!!!! A family tree...


DO NOT RE-FORMAT YOUR SYSTEM !

This is just a minor software bug thats all.

Try booting into safe mode.

Do this be repeatedly pressing F8 during switch on until you are offered boot options.

Select SAFE MODE.

Windows should continue to boot.
You will be offered a YES NO option just before windows opens up select YES.

You can try a system restore from here to an earlier point in time

Another option is from the boot options screen select LAST KNOWN CONFIGURATION THAT WORKED

Once you are in windows use add/remove programs to remove the family tree maker.

then restart.

after you have re-started go to the software website and see if there are any patches for family tree maker and download then to your hard drive.

re-install the software and then apply any patches without re-starting.

You should be OK from there

Oct 10, 2009 | Dell Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition

2 Answers

I'm using win2k pro sp5 can i do a vista upgrade?


How to dual boot Vista and XP (with Vista installed first) -- the step-by-step guide with screenshots

UPDATED | Got a Vista PC and want to install XP so you can dual-boot between them? Here's how to do it, in an easy, step-by-step format. Page 1 - Intro
media_1221353917454.jpg
Scenario: You want to install Vista on your PC alongside your XP installation, on the same drive. You have installed Vista already. (If you have XP installed first, check out our earlier tutorial on how to dual boot Vista and XP with XP installed first.)
Tutorial Summary: We need to shrink the Vista partition on the hard disk and create enough space for an installation of XP. This can be done in three ways - using the GPartEd Live CD, the DISKPART utility on the Vista DVD or the Vista Disk Management GUI - and we'll cover all three. We'll then install XP and install EasyBCD to reinstate the Vista bootloader which will be overwritten during the XP installation, and then use EasyBCD to configure Vista's bootloader to boot the XP partition.
Updated September 2008: This is an updated tutorial, based on our first Windows Vista/XP dual-booting workshop. The main differences are that we are now using Windows Vista SP1 and Windows XP SP3. EasyBCD has also been updated and this makes some of the steps in our first tutorial redundant - the whole process is now easier.
This tutorial has been tested on a VMWare 6 Workstation.

---------------------------------------------------
VISIT THIS FOR THE COMPLETE TUTORIAL :
http://apcmag.com/how_to_dual_boot_vista_and_xp_with_vista_installed_first__the_stepbystep_guide.htm
---------------------------------------------------

Mar 16, 2009 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

5 Answers

My laptop contains windows vista and i want to install Windows XP


i am using toshiba satellite l300model laptop. My laptop also contains windows vista. i want to install Windows XP as well. Some of my music software does not support Vista. Can you
please help me on how can i install Windows XP and how can i download the
XP drivers. I... Read more

May 20, 2008 | Computers & Internet

3 Answers

WIndows Vista to XP Pro


Owners of the OEM editions of Vista Business and Vista Ultimate can downgrade to Windows XP Professional, including Tablet PC Edition and x64 Edition. Only the OEM editions qualify for a downgrade, so if you purchased a new PC with either Business or Ultimate preinstalled, you're in like Flynn.

Those who aren't: All users of Vista Home Basic and Vista Home Premium, and anyone who upgraded to Vista using a retail edition of any of the operating system's SKUs. You are, as they say, SOL.

How do I downgrade? Install a copy of Windows XP Professional with the product key that came with the copy, and then when you hit the activation screen -- which is near the end of the installation process -- select the activate by phone option rather than the online method. You'll likely end up talking with a live rep; tell him that you're downgrading from Vista to XP, and give him the Vista product key. The rep is supposed to walk you through the rest.

Where do I get the XP install disc? Until this summer, Microsoft put the responsibility on the end users' shoulders. For example, in this Vista downgrade rights document (download PDF) targeting resellers, the company said "media is provided by the customer."

A few months ago, however, Microsoft relaxed, and began allowing resellers to provide Windows XP setup CDs to customers buying Vista Business- and Ultimate-equipped PCs. In some cases, discs are shipped with the PCs; in others, users must request them. Don't bother calling Microsoft; it won't provide installation media, and will instead direct you to your reseller.



If the computer maker won't send a Windows XP Pro disc, you're on your own. While perhaps not easy, getting your hands on the install media isn't impossible. Any copy of Windows XP Professional will do -- it doesn't matter if it's already been installed and/or whether the license is in use -- as long as you can find its product key. Install it (see "How do I downgrade?" above) using that key, then activate over the phone with the Vista key.

As a last resort, buy a copy. This isn't a downgrade, not as Microsoft defines it, but it's what most users think of when they use the term.

What can I do if I don't have downgrade rights? Nothing is stopping you from punting to XP other than the money invested in the Vista license already on the PC and what it will cost to replace it. The total may be inconsequential to some, a deal-breaker for others. But there are options.

Because you're paying for the swap, you can switch to any flavor of XP. Windows XP Home, for instance, typically sells online for between $50 and $90 less than Professional. Windows XP Media Center is usually priced between the two.

Once you pick an edition, you can choose from OEM, upgrade and full product versions, which are priced in that order, lowest first. OEM, often called "system builder," omits support and can only be installed on one machine, ever. Windows XP Home OEM is sold online at for around $90. The upgrade version, which runs about $100, can be installed, removed and installed on another PC, but requires proof that you own a legitimate copy of an older operating system. You don't need to install that predecessor, only insert its CD at some point during the XP installation. Eligible versions for an XP upgrade include Windows 98, Windows 98 SE and Windows Millennium.

Finally, there's the most expensive option: the full edition, which sells for around $190. No earlier Windows version is necessary to install this, and like the upgrade, it can be transferred later to another PC.

Of course, the most affordable downgrade is one using the XP installation CD you saved when you upgraded that well-worn machine of yours to Vista earlier this year. You did save it, right? If you didn't get an install disc with that box when you bought it -- and some vendors don't bother, instead slapping restore files in a hidden partition on the hard drive, which has been, of course, copied over by Vista -- you may be able to pry one from the reseller. Dell owners, for instance, can use an online form to request one free copy of the install CD.

I have XP and I'm ready to downgrade. Now what? From here, a downgrade is just like any clean install. You'll need to back up data files, record and/or copy settings and passwords, and make sure you have installation files and/or discs for the applications you'll reinstall in XP. If you've upgraded to software suitable for Vista, it's likely that the newer programs will also run under XP. Copying data and the application installation files you've downloaded from the Web is easiest if you plug in an external drive.


There aren't any downgrade utilities to do the kind of work that upgrade, or migration tools, provide when you're moving up in the world, operating system-wise, so don't bother looking for them. Pity.

Any caveats? Although Vista has been out for less than a year, that's plenty of time for change. If you bought a machine preinstalled with Vista, make sure there are XP drivers for the PC, its components and any new peripherals before you downgrade. Check the computer maker's site. If you find any major holes, reconsider.

I'm lazy but still want to downgrade. What are my options? If you're fed up with Vista, but not so sick of it that you're ready to face a complete mulligan on the operating system, virtualization might be for you. Add virtualization machine software on the Vista-running PC, create a VM, then install XP into the VM. You'll still need a licensed copy of Windows XP to be legit. Fortunately, unlike Vista, XP's EULA doesn't forbid virtualization. (Only Vista Business and Ultimate, the downgrader's friends, can be legally run in a virtual environment.)

You really have three picks here, including Microsoft's own Virtual PC 2007 (free), SWsoft's Parallels Workstation ($50) and VMware Inc.'s VMware Workstation ($189).

The biggest bonus in going virtual is that if you change your mind -- again -- and decide Vista isn't so bad after all, you can just delete the VM and have your old, or new, machine back.

Apr 10, 2008 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional With...

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