Question about Bushnell Voyager 78-9945 Telescope

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How do you use the red dot finder? and when I look throught the format eyepiece everything is upside down.... Thank you Stacie

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Astronomical telescopes show all objects upside down and reversed-- this is not a problem; there is no up or down in space.

The red dot finder helps you point the telescope-- focus on a distant object and center it in the eyepiece.

Without moving the telescope -- adjust the red dot onto the object. Now you can use the finder to locate objects.

Posted on Dec 28, 2008

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When I look through the view finder--everything is upside down???


Astro telescopes normally do show an inverted image, since for most purposes this does not matter. For terrestrial viewing, such as thru someone's window, you can buy an "erect image" or "correct image" prism which gives an upright image.

http://www.optcorp.com/telescope-accessories/optical-tube-accessories/diagonal-prism-eyepiece-holder.html?a_diagonal_design_f=1090

I don't know of such a thing for the finder scope, you would have to buy a new finder.

http://www.optcorp.com/celestron-9x50-illum-ra-correct-image-finderscope-93781.html

Mar 06, 2014 | Celestron NexStar 114GT (269 x 114mm)...

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Cant get an image.Is it right that the view finderimage is upside down


The image of all astronomical telescopes are upside down (SCTs are upside down and reversed). RACI (right angled, correct image) finders do produce a right-side up image. For daytime use a erect image prism eyepiece.
Follow below instructions (except 7 in your case)

  1. Get Stellarium or another fine astronomy program
  2. During the day, point the telescope at a part of the landscape about 100 yards away.
  3. Use the lowest power eyepiece (highest number) in the focal tube.
  4. Center the landscape object in the telescope.
  5. Align the finder scope so that it points exactly where the main telescope is.
  6. At night, leave the scope out to reach thermal equilibrium (about an hour for small reflectors and refractors)
  7. If the scope is on a EQ mount, polar align.
  8. Point the finder at the moon. The moon should be in the main scope also.
  9. Practice finding the moon before you start on the planets
  10. Once you are comfortable with the moon and planets, you can go for the deep sky objects

Feb 28, 2013 | Vivitar Viv-tel-76700 75x/350x Reflector...

1 Answer

Images are upside down with the eyepiece installed


Astronomical telescopes are made this way. (There are RACI-right angle correct image) finders on the market. It just takes some getting used to.

Dec 29, 2012 | Celestron SkyExpedition 76AZ Newtonian...

1 Answer

We are trying to test out viewing land based objects using the 30X eyepiece, which according to the instructions, should appear right side up and not upside down! This is not happening.


It's NOT really a problem. ALL reflector style telescopes show upside down images. This will not affect your star gazing since there is no UP OR DOWN in outer space. Read my tips on my profile page.

You can buy an "erecting diagonal" for terrestrial viewing- BUT this is not what an astronomical telescope is actually used for.

So align the small finder scope on a distant object like the top of a telescope pole during the day time. Point the main tube at the pole and get the tip top in the main tube's eyepiece. Without moving the telescope adjust the crosshairs on the finder scope on the exact same spot. The moon should be your first target at night and you can check and refine the finder scope on the moon.

Mar 12, 2011 | Bushnell 3" Reflector Telescope 60% OFF w/...

1 Answer

I have a new Brookstone compact telescope. The image in the smaller viewfinder is upside down making it difficult to line up with image in main telescope. Is this normal? And if so, any suggestions for...


Astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Telescope manuals recommend that you align the finder scope in daylight, by pointing the main scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

Jan 22, 2011 | Telescopes

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I cannot see anything, just blackness... i have removed the lens-cap and put in the eye-piece as well as the front dust cap but all i see is black, also the red finder is not helping me aim.


Use the eyepiece with the LARGEST number written on it. Practice focusing on a distant object during the day time. You must adjust the red dot finder to MATCH the view in the main tube.

Point the scope at a distant telephone pole, and without moving the main tube adjust the red dot so it lands on the exact same spot. DO NOT use the 2x barlow if you have one.

Dec 26, 2010 | Telescopes

2 Answers

Cant see ****


Cannot see anything in the daytime? We need more details.

Put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the focuser. Try focusing on a distant object during the day time.

You must follow the setup procedures in the manual for accurate GOTO function at night.

Nov 09, 2010 | Celestron NexStar 114GT (269 x 114mm)...

1 Answer

How to use cir electronic finder


You mean the red dot finder?

Put and object in the center of the eyepiece. Can be top of telesphone pole, a distant church steeple---

Without moving the main telescope, adjust the red dot in the finder to match the object in the main eypiece.


Nov 13, 2009 | Galileo FS-135DX (135x1100) (250 x 135mm)...

1 Answer

How to focus in on an object


First use the eyepiece with the LARGEST number written on it. This is your lowest magnification.

Then center the object in the telescope eyepiece, and without moving the telescope CENTER the crosshairs or the red finder dot on the target.

Jul 07, 2009 | Galileo New Age 800x80 Telescope

1 Answer

Red dot finder scope


Simple-- you can also do this during the day on an object at least 100 yards away-- but at night; get the moon centered in the eyepiece and without moving the telescope center the red dot on the moon. This will get you almost aligned-- then put a bright star in the eyepiece and readjust the red dot to center the star.

Jan 09, 2009 | Bushnell NorthStar 78-8831 (525 x 76mm)...

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