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Home amplifier I have a technical pro home amplifier i'm getting a humming noise from it? I have it connected to a surge protecter/filter and also have 30.5m high density speaker wire. And i still get the light hum from it! This amp is a intergrated power amp. It has a cooling fan on the back that pulls the heat out i'm wondering if that is were the noise is comeing from? The rated output power is channel A:1KHz.8? i dont know if the symbol after the 8 means ohms.And channel B is the same. would that be the problem if my speakers only have 4 ohms.

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  • hurrey523 Dec 17, 2008

    I just bought the same amp and have the exact same hum, no matter what.  No response from their support staff yet, I'm definitely open to all suggestions.

  • magayver May 13, 2009

    When I turn on the Krell Showcase 5.1 amplifier there is a spark like pop followed by a hum. It works and the music can be ehard if loud enough so the hum can not be heard.

    Any ideas?

    Thanks

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  • 319 Answers

Hum is probably due to insufficent grounding somewhere. Make sure coax cables at input are good. Re-locate unit away from aplliances

Posted on Apr 17, 2008

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Loud hum from subwoofer


The number-one cause of subwoofer/speaker hum is the coaxial cable connecting your cable or satellite receiver to your provider (either through an inground run to a cable box or through a satellite dish). Here is how you test for this:
  1. Turn your system on and get it to produce the hum by watching a movie. Pause your DVD or videotape so that the hum is all you hear.
    TIPDon't use a normal cable or satellite program for this; you're about to disconnect the cable that provides the audio and video for your cable/satellite feed.
  2. Find the coaxial cable running from your cable or satellite receiver to your service provider, and while listening to the hum, unscrew the connector and disconnect the cable.
Did the hum stop or reduce by a large amount? If so, the cable you disconnected is the source of the noise. If this is the problem, you have several ways to fix the issue permanently (if not, jump ahead to the next section):
  1. Call your cable or satellite company and ask for a service call. Sometimes you get a smart cable guy, and if you demonstrate the problem he can do something upstream to ground the coaxial cable and remove or reduce the hum.
  2. Buy a power strip that has F connectors as part of its surge protection. Plug the strip into the AC outlet and feed your main coaxial signal through these connectors. This ties the shielding of the coax (the source of the noise) to your AC ground and sometimes can solve the problem.
    WARNINGOddly enough, this solution (surge protection) can sometimes increase the humming.
  3. Go to your local RadioShack store and buy three inexpensive items: a Matching Transformer (part #15-1253), an Indoor/Outdoor Matching Transformer (#15-1140), and a Cable Coupler (#278-304). Connect your coaxial cable to the cable coupler, and then to the first matching transformer. The output is two screws for the old two-wire antenna wire. Your indoor/outdoor matching transformer has two connectors for the screws, and the other end is a coaxial connector. Hook your cable or satellite receiver into this connector and see if the hum goes away.
Here is why this trick works: the first transformer converts your 75-ohm coax into a 300-ohm antenna connector. The second transformer converts the 300-ohm back to a 75-ohm connector. The humming, which usually is at around 60 Hz, can't pass through these conversions.

Ground Loop Hum

The second cause of hum is called a ground loop, and it almost always shows up right after you bring home a brand-new, self-powered subwoofer, or perhaps an external amplifier.
Take a look at all the plugs on the power cords on your home theater equipment. In most systems, the receiver (or amplifier) has a three-prong power plug, but most of your other devices have only two-prong plugs. This is not by accident; the device with the three-prong power plug is grounded. This means that device "owns" the ground. As long as no other power device has a three-prong plug, everything works well.
When you bring home a self-powered subwoofer and plug it in, though, you might notice it has a three-prong plug; this is for safety reasons. However, when you connect an RCA cable from your receiver to your subwoofer and turn everything on, you suddenly notice a loud hum.
The external amplifier in your subwoofer is now fighting with the amplifier in your receiver for possession of the ground. Both devices want to define 0.00 volts. But because the wiring in the two amplifiers to your household AC ground is different, one device is really using 0.001 volt and the other device uses something closer to 0.003 volts. The subwoofer cable connects the two, and the fighting begins.
You have to stop these two devices from trying to own the ground, or get them to not "see" each other. First, make your system produce the humming noise. Disconnect the single RCA cable between your receiver and subwoofer. Did the noise stop? If so, you have a ground loop issue.
The proper, safest way to solve this problem is to buy a special subwoofer cable with little arrows on the wire to show the signal direction (see ).
[img src="http://oreilly.com/images/hacks/htheaterhks/figs/htheaterhks_0601.jpg">
Figure 1. Subwoofer cable with directional arrowUnfortunately, many people have been ridiculed when asking about these sorts of cables at their local electronics store: "But cables don't really have a direction. My expert friend at work laughed at me when I asked about this!" Yes, your friend is right. Cables don't have a direction, but these little arrows indicate that this cable will prevent or solve your ground loop problem.
Remember when I said the hum started when you connected the RCA cable? That RCA cable really contains two wires: the center wire and something called the shield. The center wire carries the audio signal, but the shield tries to define 0.00 volts. The shield is the wire that lets the two different components (the receiver or amplifier, and the subwoofer) see each other's ground, and causes the fight. What if you took your subwoofer cable and disconnected the shielding from just one end? Wouldn't that solve the problem? Yes, it would. This is exactly what a subwoofer cable with little arrows does. The shield is not connected at both ends. The shield has to be connected at one end, for connecting to your receiver or amp, so you should run the cable so that the arrows show the flow from the receiver to the subwoofer.
WARNINGIt is unsafe to use a two-prong to three-prong "cheater" plug on the subwoofer power cord to solve the hum problem. Even if the subwoofer came with a cheater plug in the box, it's REALLY not safe to do. Don't do it.

Sep 01, 2013 | Denon Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

LG DVD reciever HT 502 Says protected


It is possible that the amplifier had encountered a fault with a higher current drain which had triggered it to a protection fault condition. The fault can be with your output drivers. Please check for short on the outputs fitted for both the channels. Use a meter after disconnecting to check for short in the drivers. Disconnect the positive and negative voltages to the output and see if the protect changes. Even a fault in the preamp stages that drives in high current into the output can shut the Amplifier. Sometimes this can be a noise which can be a HUM or HISS before the protect works. Faulty capacitors in these circuits also can cause similar issues and needs close observation.You need to confirm and replace the specific stages or outputs. If not there can be issues in the mother board. Maybe the protect circuit by itself is shutting off due to a faulty bias or there is a leak in any voltage/current sensing circuit. Also disconnect the speakers and test, if the amplifier comes out of the protect mode then check for short on the speakers.

Jan 20, 2012 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

No sound coming from speakers all connections good


It is possible that the amplifier had encountered a fault with a higher current drain which had triggered it to a protection fault condition. The fault can be your output drivers- the MOSFETS/IC's fitted for both the channels, Use a meter after disconnecting to check for short in the drivers. Disconnect the positive and negative voltages to the output and see if the protect changes. Even a fault in the preamp stages that drives in high current into the output can shut the Amplifier. Sometimes this can be a noise like a HUM or HISS before the protect works. Faulty capacitors in these circuits also can cause similar issues and needs close observation.
You need to confirm and replace the specific stages or outputs. If not there can be issues in the mother board, maybe the protect circuit by itself is shutting off due to a faulty bias , maybe a leak in any voltage/current sensing circuit. Also disconnect the speakers and test, if the protect is off then check for short on the speakers.

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Sep 10, 2011 | Kenwood Audio-Video Control Center VRS6100...

1 Answer

Hi, I have an HB3502U Technical Pro Hybrid Amplifier/Receiver but no matter how I connect it there is aloud Humming noise. Can you help?


The most obvious cause is the failure of the large Electrolytic Capacitor(s) in the main power supply section. These take out the 50/60Hz hum in the mains supply, which is what that noise is!

Aug 19, 2011 | Technical Pro TA-4250 Amplifier

2 Answers

Sony STRDH800 emits a loud humming noise cuming throu speakers as soon i switched on and after 3 minuts av reciver switched off byself and blinking protected......plz help


It is possible that the amplifier had encountered a fault with a higher current drain which had triggered it to a protection fault condition. The fault can be your output drivers- the MOSFETS/IC's fitted for both the channels, Use a meter after disconnecting to check for short in the drivers. Disconnect the positive and negative voltages to the output and see if the protect changes. Even a fault in the preamp stages that drives in high current into the output can shut the Amplifier. Sometimes this can be a noise like a HUM or HISS before the protect works. Faulty capacitors in these circuits also can cause similar issues and needs close observation.
You need to confirm and replace the specific stages or outputs. If not there can be issues in the mother board, maybe the protect circuit by itself is shutting off due to a faulty bias , maybe a leak in any voltage/current sensing circuit. Also disconnect the speakers and test, if the protect is off then check for short on the speakers.

Aug 03, 2011 | Sony STR-DH800

1 Answer

Blinking timer in pioneer home theatre hdt dv 88 does not get off


It is possible that the amplifier had encountered a fault with a higher current drain which had triggered it to a protection fault condition. The fault can be your output drivers- the MOSFETS/IC's fitted for both the channels, Use a meter after disconnecting to check for short in the drivers. Disconnect the positive and negative voltages to the output and see if the protect changes. Even a fault in the preamp stages that drives in high current into the output can shut the Amplifier. Sometimes this can be a noise like a HUM or HISS before the protect works. Faulty capacitors in these circuits also can cause similar issues and needs close observation.
You need to confirm and replace the specific stages or outputs. If not there can be issues in the mother board, maybe the protect circuit by itself is shutting off due to a faulty bias , maybe a leak in any voltage/current sensing circuit. Also disconnect the speakers and test, if the protect is off then check for short on the speakers.

Jul 22, 2011 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

TX-SR705 60 hz. Hum


If you have a Home Theater Line conditioner on this receiver, not a power surge protector, even a "Monster" surge suppressor, your problem Is AC related. For troubleshooting; first if your AC power cord is three pronged, go to Lowes, Home Depot, etc. and get a three prong to two prong adapter. Your problem is a "Ground" issue, however it may not be from the receiver, it could be "Anything else" in your home. Even an actual outlet with a loose wire. It can be very very time consuming to "hunt down". An adapter will take the rest of the house out of the picture. Disconnect all other input sources like Cable, DVD, etc. then turn the unit back on. If you still have a humm, yes the problem is internal and needs serviced. If it stops, re-connect one item at a time until the noise re-appears and you have your culpret. If you don't have a line conditioning noise eliminating Theater surge protection unit; Get one! best few hundred bucks you could ever spend. It will protect all your electronics and could save you thousands! Panamax, Furman, Monster, are your top 3. If you still have issues, post a comment and I can help you further. Hope this helps.

Aug 23, 2009 | Onkyo TX-SR705 Receiver

1 Answer

Lightning Strike


Replace with new will need new main board (170 bucks) and modeum board, for best protection it needs a fax filter that protects power line and phone line, standard surge protecter only protects power line

Nov 30, 2007 | Brother MFC 210C All-In-One InkJet Printer

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