Question about Nikon Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G ED AF-S DX (silver) Lens

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Subject gets dark when zooming in--even in perfectly good light!

My lens works fine when zoomed out all the way, but the closer you zoom in, the subject gets dark, so the camera won't take the picture. What's the deal?

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  • Nickrystal Jun 06, 2010

    I don't think it's the camera settings, as two other lenses work just fine on the same body. Thanks!

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  • 115 Answers

I think something is wrong in your camera settings you just need to fix your settings or if that is not the problem you can et it repaired goodluck:) and please rate this solution...

Posted on Jun 06, 2010

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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In Chile just bought a camera Lumix DMC FZ70, zooming only works in automatic mode AI in the other modes only works zoom 1 to 3x, please indicate what should I do


First thing Ariel is to read the manual. Specs say it has something called 'Intelligent Zoom', so it might be by design.

Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ70 / DMC-FZ72 Key Features:
  • 16.1-Megapixel 1/2.3" High Sensitivity MOS sensor
  • LEICA DC VARIO DC 60x (20-1,200mm) Ultra Wide-angle Zoom Lens
  • 120x Intelligent Zoom
  • POWER O.I.S. (Optical Image Stabilizer) with Active Mode
  • LSI Venus Engine Image Processor
  • 3.0-inch 460k-dot Intelligent LCD Display
  • 0.2-inch 202K-dot EVF (Electronic Viewfinder)
  • 1,920 x 1,080 60i Full HD Video Recording with AVCHD (MPEG-4 / H.264) Format or 30p in MP4 with the Dolby Digital
  • Built-In Wind Shield Zoom Microphone
  • Up to 9 fps continuous shooting
  • ISO up to 6400
  • RAW file recording
  • P/A/S/M Full Manual Control
  • iA (Intelligent Auto) / iA Plus Mode
  • Creative Panorama
  • Creative Control
  • Creative Retouch
  • Creative Video Mode
  • HDR (High Dynamic Range) mode
  • 3D Photo mode
  • Optional DMW-LT55 Tele Conversion Lens extends the zoom ratio to 1.7x to pull the subject far off even closer with minimum deterioration of image quality.
  • Optional DMW-LC55 Close-up Lens

    http://panasonic.ca/viewing/ALL/DMC-FZ70P/OI/vqt5b59-eng/vqt5b59-eng.pdf

Jul 04, 2016 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ70 Digital Camera

1 Answer

What is the difference in the optical and digital zoom?


Hi,

Find the difference below

Digital Zoom

1. Digital zoom is a part of digital cameras, and camcorders, which helps to crop the entire image, and then digitally enlarge the size of the viewfinder of the portion that is needed to zoom in on
2. Digital zoom crops the image down to a centred area with the same ratio as the original, and also interpolating the result back up to the pixel dimensions of the original. this method involves cropping, hence the resolution and quality is reduced
3. Digital zoom, crops a portion of the image and then enlarges it back to size. And due to this, image quality is reduced in comparison with the original one.
4. Using the digital zoom allows the user to get closer to the subject when the photographer wants to be discreet about taking pictures, like taking a picture of a person in a graduation ceremony.

Optical Zoom

1. While taking a picture using a Camera to want to get a close shot of the subject without moving physically closer, photographers use the optical zoom.
2. The optical zoom ratio of a digital camera measures how much the lens can actually zoom in to make subjects appear closer. Optical zoom, enlarges a picture while keeping the resolution and sharpness of the picture high.

3. There is no relation between optical zoom and the resolution of the photo, as optical zoom only enlarges the whole image or the subject to a certain range. So image quality only depends upon the mega pixel (MP) of the camera

4. Optical zoom is very useful, while taking a picture of a landscape, or to get a closer view of a subject, without reducing the quality of the entire image, like taking a picture of a Rainbow in the sky.
Regards,
Ron


// Rate the solution with 4 thumbs up if the answer is satisfactory

Jul 01, 2011 | Nikon Cameras

1 Answer

The problem is that u know the sony hdv xr500x when u put it on the picture is very dark we have tried it under light too put but the picture is still dark


Hello
When you look at your pictures are they dark, murky and hard to see? If you took pictures at a wedding, dance recital, theater performance or any indoor event and they came out dark, read on to learn why your pictures are dark, and how to fix this common camera problem.

Many people take pictures of indoor events, only to be unsatisfied with the final outcome of their photos. Although you may have bought the top of the line film or digital camera, there are a few limitations that you need to know about.
To correctly expose your pictures, you camera needs a lot of light. The compact point and shoot varieties adjust for this when you're outside during the daytime, and usually your pictures turn out fine, right? Well, then how come when you take indoor pictures, they sometimes come out too dark? There are two culprits; your zoom function and your flash.
Most compact cameras today offer a zoom function. When I used to work in retail photography sales, the first feature that consumers would ask for is zoom. People love to get close-up pictures without using their feet. Although zoom does bring your subject matter in closer, it also decreases the amount of light that can get into your camera. Essentially, the more you zoom, the less light your camera can receive, and your pictures will be darker.
So, if your taking pictures indoors, in a dark church, gym or other window-less room it is very difficult for your camera to get enough light to properly expose your pictures.
This is when most photographers decide to turn on their flash. The flash on your camera is a great tool to illuminate dark situations that are in close proximity to the camera. Most built-in flash units are designed to allow the light to travel 8-10 feet away in poor quality light and up to 15-20 feet in brighter situations.
What most camera users fail to realize is that although your zoom function is visually bringing you closer to the action, you flash cannot reach that far to illuminate the subject, and your pictures will be dark.
Hope it helps, if so do rate the solution

Dec 21, 2010 | Sony Cameras

1 Answer

Every picture i take is not a good quality either it's blurry or the color is horrible - kind of yellowish - what kind of adjustment do i have to make


Well the blurry is caused by poor focus. Try not to zoom too much. Better to get closer to the subject if possible. Study your manual and adjust your diopter which loosely means adjust the viewfinder in and out whilst looking at a subject without using any zoom until the picture is clear. Then take you'll find it easier to focus when you do actually zoom. Sometimes there's a small sliding piece of plastic sticking out of the side of the lens. Otherwise it's a matter of turning the eyepiece to get the clarity. That's why I said check the manual. That will explain which method to use.

The yellowish colour is unusual. I would say check you have the White balance switch set to auto but lack of white balance is not usually a yellow picture. But check the white balance switch anyway and make sure it's in auto mode.

Ordinary light bulbs or some street lighting can give a yellow caste so check you have the inside outside button switched to the correct position, depending on where you are at the time of shooting.

Did you buy the camera used or new. Often people who have faulty cameras will sell them off cheap and run. Leaving the owner with the problems.

So to sum up. get closer to your subject rather than use zoom if you can. If you use a lot of zoom either use a tripod or place the camera on a firm surface or even hold the camera whilst you stop yourself from moving by leaning against a wall or tree etc.

Next remeber where you are and switch the indoor/outdoor switch accordingly

Apr 22, 2010 | JVC Everio GZ-MG130 Camcorder

1 Answer

Cannot figure out how to take good macro shot with new Tamron len


With an SLR you only get true macro focussing on a lens that has proper macro focussing abilities. Unfortunately in the photogaraphy world, there are a huge number of lenses which claim to have macro ability but are stretching the term far too much.

Strictly speaking, macro means that the lens is capable of producing images on the sensor which are the same size as the actual subject or even bigger, at life size this is described as 1:1 macro. Your Tamron lens is only capable of a maximum 1:3.7 "macro", and that's only at the 200mm zoom setting with the subject no closer than 45cm from the lens. By SLR zoom lens standards, that's actually pretty good, but if you want to go closer and get greater magnification you need to either use a supplementary close-up filter lens or for better optical quality use a set of extension rings. The trade off with close up filter lenses is poor image quality and usually plenty of colour fringing and with extension rings is that if you're using a 2x magnification at 200mm, your f5-ish maximum aperture at 200mm becomes a very dark f10.

The only way to get good macro results is to either use a proper (=expensive) macro lens and excellent lighting, or use extension rings plus a good ring flash unit. However you can improve your macro by investing in a more capable zoom lens with a closer minimum focus distance and a better aperture at the telephoto end of the range. This can be expensive, or you can pick up some very cheap 35mm film SLR lenses. Using an adapter will never allow you to achieve infinity focus on a Canon digital SLR but you can get a close focussing 200mm f3.8 very cheaply. The crop factor of your smaller sensor means it will have the same angle of view as a 310mm lens but the aperture will remain at f3.8. As Canon digital SLR's have the deepest body register (lens to sensor distance) of the current systems then you'll also have the effect of using it on an extension ring. The downside is that you'll have to use the lens in a totally manual mode as no information will be communicated to your camera body. By mounting the lens back to front using a reversing ring you can achieve some really stunning macro magnifications but then you need a tripod, powerful flash and absolutely no wind... There was also a Makinon 80-200mm zoom which sells for next to nothing on auction websites, but it had a macro collar which allowed it to achieve around half size macro (1:2).

Alternatively, if the Fuji still works and does the job just keep it in your camera bag ready for those types of shots. overall, that seems the easiest and best solution unless you really want to get heavily into macro shooting.

I hope that I've helped you, please ask more if there's anything unclear. I've tried to keep a very complicated subject as simple as possible. Please also take a moment to rate my answer.

Mar 05, 2010 | Tamron 28-300mm f/3.5-6.3 DI XR for Canon

1 Answer

V570 Dual Lens, will not switch to ordinary lens.


Hi, My V570 works fine on widescreen lens (the default on startup) but when I zoom up to switch to the other lens it goes to a dark blank screen and will take a similarly dark blank picture. I can hear the zoom activating as I click it so I think that is ok. I opened the camera

Jun 10, 2008 | Kodak EasyShare V570 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Red Eye


If the red-eye reduction is turned on, and you can verify that the pre-flash is functioning, you may need to think about shooting technique. With ultra-compact cameras, the flash is necessarily placed close to the lens. This is the worst design possible to avoid red-eye. To reduce red-eye as much as possible, ensure the red-eye reduction system is turned on (and functioning properly), and get close to the subject. I mean "physically" close, not just close by zooming. Use as little zoom as possible. If the subject is small, move closer, without relying on the zoom lens to make the subject appear closer.

Mar 08, 2008 | Canon PowerShot SD1000 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Optical / Digital Zoom


Press the "T" for telephoto and get closer to the subject. Optical telephoto zoom is like using a telescope to get closer to the subject before taking the picture. With optical Telephoto zoom you can maintain the full resolution and quality. After you have used all of the optical Telephoto range, the camera will continue to enhance the image with Digital Zoom. This enhances the image inside the camera by reducing the resolution and expanding fewer pixels to fill the same image space. Use the "W" Wide-angle button to back-up away from the subject or get a bigger area into your picture. You can even ZOOM IN on a picture in the playback mode for a better look at the details. Touch the Magnifying Glass Icon. Use the Arrow Keys to move around the display area.

Sep 11, 2005 | Toshiba Sora PDR-T20 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Optical / Digital Zoom


Press the "T" for telephoto and get closer to the subject. Optical telephoto zoom is like using a telescope to get closer to the subject before taking the picture. With optical Telephoto zoom you can maintain the full resolution and quality. After you have used all of the optical Telephoto range, the camera will continue to enhance the image with Digital Zoom. This enhances the image inside the camera by reducing the resolution and expanding fewer pixels to fill the same image space. Use the "W" Wide-angle button to back-up away from the subject or get a bigger area into your picture. You can even ZOOM IN on a picture in the playback mode for a better look at the details. Turn the Mode Dial to Playback, then press the "T". Use the Enter button to move around the display area. Press the middle of the ENTER KEY to see your images in thumbnail view and / or scroll through several images at one time to find a specific / special image quickly.

Sep 11, 2005 | Toshiba PDR-3300 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Optical vs. digital zoom


It's important to understand this difference, as you could be disappointed with the results if you use one rather than the other. Optical zoom works like the zoom on a traditional film camera. When you push the button to zoom in or out, physical lens elements move inside the camera, reducing the field of view and making the object you're shooting appear closer. Digital zoom, on the other hand, has no moving parts. The camera interpolates a small portion of an image to artificially restore the file to its original size. Using its electronic brain, the digital camera analyzes what it sees and digitally zooms in, usually two or three times closer. Unfortunately, digital zoom also reduces the resolution of an image, so your picture will tend to be more pixilated than the same image taken with an optical zoom camera. If you're just snapping an image to e-mail to a friend, this loss of resolution won't be so noticeable. But in situations where the highest quality counts, skip the digital zoom and use your PC's image-editing tools to zero in on your subject.

Sep 08, 2005 | HP Photosmart 120 Digital Camera

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