Question about Nikon D90 Digital Camera with 18-105mm lens

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It suddenly started to reproduce black images...the shutter, aperture seem to work normaly. It simply reproduces black images...What could be the problem?

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Ask your friend Roman to borrow U his perfectly good one...;)

Posted on Jun 06, 2010

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I have a D60 and when using my new lighting kit if the aperture is faster than1/200 it creates a blackout across part of the image due to the mirror. Any solutions?


It's not the aperture, it's the shutter speed. It's also not the mirror, but the shutter.
The camera's fastest shutter sync speed is 1/200. You must use a shutter speed no faster than that. Due to the construction of the shutter, the frame is not fully exposed simultaneously at faster speeds and thus part of the image is blacked out.

Using a flash, the amount of light is controlled almost exclusively by the flash; the exposure is controlled by the aperture and the shutter speed is all but irrelevant.

Feb 15, 2013 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera

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Hi When I try to take pictures of the moon at night, the all I get is bright light without any detail. The sensor seems overloaded and the image seems smudged. I have tried with the intelligent...


All automatic-exposure cameras try to render the scene as a middle gray. The moon is a small portion of the total image, so the camera concentrates on the sky. In trying to get enough light to make the sky go from black to gray, the moon gets completely overexposed. What you want is the moon properly exposed, even if that means the sky goes completely black.

For a full moon, you want the same exposure you would use at noon on a bright day. If you think about it for a moment, it becomes obvious. The full moon is simply a landscape at high noon. Unfortunately, the camera can't know that.

Set the camera to manual. Start with the "Sunny-16 Rule", which tells you to set the aperture to f/16 and the shutter speed to 1/ISO. So for example, set the ISO to 200, the aperture to f/16, and the shutter speed to 1/200. Look at the result on the screen and adjust the exposure as needed.

That was for a full moon. For other phases you may need to add exposure, but the "Sunny-16 Rule" will still give you a starting point.

Jun 18, 2011 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX3 Digital Camera

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The S and M modes on the dial..show black images when taking a pic; any idea why?


I'd say you're severely underexposing. The M mode is for manual exposure. This means you're responsible for setting the appropriate shutter speed and aperture. The aperture controls how much light passes through the lens, the shutter speed controls how long that light hits the sensor. The two of them have to be adjusted properly to suit the amount of light hitting the subject. If the lens doesn't admit enough light and/or the shutter is opened for too short an amount of time, not enough light gets to the sensor and you get a black image.

The S mode is for shutter priority. This lets you set the shutter speed and the camera automatically adjusts the lens aperture for correct exposure. However, the lens has a maximum aperture beyond which it cannot open. If the shutter speed is too fast, again not enough light gets through the lens and you get a black image.

Since you didn't specify the model of your Nikon camera, I can't tell you exactly how to adjust the shutter speed and aperture. If you can't find the procedure in your manual, please feel free to reply to this post, specifying the model.

Feb 24, 2011 | Nikon Cameras

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Hi, I have taken over 20 rolls of film so far and haven't had a problem until now. Whenever, I go outside to take pictures (in the daylight), my pictures come out black (last 5 rolls of film) In the same...


I think the aperture is not shutting down to the opening you set it to. In an SLR, the aperture is normally fully open for viewing through the lens. When you press the button, the mirror flips up and the aperture closes to the figure you have set, then the shutter fires. If you have set a daytime aperture and the aperture sticks, you get a wide open aperture and an overexposed shot, but at night, you have set an open or almost open aperture anyway.

It is possible that the shutter is the problem, but the aperture is more likely to go wrong in my experience. It only takes a drop of oil on the blades. There ought to be a button or lever to shut the aperture down for depth of field preview which you could use to test this, or just look in the lens when the shutter fires to see if the aperture closes.

Nov 14, 2010 | Canon EOS-AE-1 35mm SLR Camera

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I have a Nikon d40X. When I attempt to take a picture, the shutter speed is EXTREMELY slow. Because of this, my pics are all blurry. I am not sure what caused this to start happening. Can someone please...


Steve - the Nikon dSLR cameras are very capable. Check the position of the mode dial:

989d80e.jpg

The image above has it set to "P" or Program mode. Change it to "AUTO" and take a picture of a well lit scene (preferably outside in the daytime). You should get a properly exposed image. If the mode dial is set to "M" or Manual mode, the shutter speed is probably too low, and the aperture either too small or large if the image is dark or light, respectively. You'll have to turn the knobs on the front AND rear to adjust BOTH shutter speed and aperture (f-stop) to find the right combination of exposure time and aperture opening allowed into the camera to suggest motion (more blurry with a slow shutter - or more sharp with a fast shutter), in addition to DOF or depth of field.

You may have a similar issue when set to "P". If you are in this mode, the camera will attempt to determine the best shutter and aperture settings for you. You can veiw the settings chosen in the view finder. Likewise, you may override either shutter speed or aperture changing the aperture OR shutter speed control knobs. The camera will automatically change the other - to provide a properly exposed image.

Review the manual here. Page 39 details the mode dial and how it works. Page 18 discusses the
"Digital Vari-Program" modes depicted by the icons, and the "AUTO" label. These modes should be avoided, unless you are happy with "snapshot" type pictures. The most creativity will come from using the camera in one of the other modes: M,A,S or P. Taking the time to learn them will greatly increase your enjoyment of the camera and resulting images.

I hope this was a good starting point for you & good luck!

Nov 01, 2010 | Nikon D40x Digital Camera

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Blackness ... everywhere


A stuck shutter is another common failure mode for digital cameras. The symptoms of a stuck or "sticky" shutter are very similar to CCD image sensor failure. The camera may take black pictures (for shutter stuck closed), or the pictures may be very bright and overexposed, especially when taken outdoors (for shutter stuck open).

To confirm a stuck shutter, put the camera in any mode other than "Auto", and turn the flash OFF (you don't want to blind yourself for the next step). Next look down the lens and take a picture. You should see a tiny flicker in the center of the lens as the shutter opens and closes. If no movement is seen, then you likely have a stuck shutter. If so, please see the following for further info and a simple fix that may help:

http://camerarepair.blogspot.com/2009/05/simple-fix-for-stuck-shutter.html

Jul 10, 2009 | Canon PowerShot S2 IS Digital Camera

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What are the effects of Adobe RGB?


Adobe RGB enables more vivid color reproduction, for Adobe RGB is capable of more color space than sRGB. It offers more flexibility than sRGB on image processing and image retouching. Please note, however, a normal PC monitor cannot realize the color reproduction effect, for the available color range of the monitor is restricted by its specification. Further, an image with Adobe RGB ICC profile may be reproduced in poor color depth unless color management is provided in advance. Meanwhile, there may be cases that the Adobe RGB effect is realized in printing out, as some colors can be reproduced by a printer.

Sep 15, 2005 | Konica Minolta DiMAGE A200 Digital Camera

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What are the effects of using Adobe RGB?


It is possible to reproduce the more vivid color by Adobe RGB because this can obtain more color space than sRGB. At processing image and editing the degree of freedom of Adobe RGB is high. However some colors cannot be reproduced on monitor of PC, and sometimes the images look almost same as those recorded by sRGB. Some cases you can obtain the effects when printing as some colors can be reproduced by printer though the colors which are impossible to reproduce on monitor of PC.

Sep 15, 2005 | Konica Minolta DiMAGE A1 Digital Camera

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Exposure control options


The following exposure options are available: P (Program auto), A (Aperture priority), S (Shutter priority), and M (Manual). There are four scene programs modes available in which the camera will choose the optimal settings for the picture: Landscape: Suitable for taking photos of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. Both the foreground and the background are in focus. Since blues and greens are reproduced vividly in this mode, the landscape mode is excellent for shooting natural scenery. Portrait: Suitable for shooting a portrait-style image of a person. This mode features an in-focus subject against a blurred background. Sports: Suitable for capturing fast-moving action such as sports scene or moving vehicles without blurring. Night scene: Suitable for taking night scene photos with a slower shutter speed.

Sep 04, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-8080 Wide Zoom Digital...

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Exposure control options


The following exposure options are available: P (Program auto), A (Aperture priority), S (Shutter priority), and M (Manual). There are five scene programs modes available in which the camera will choose the optimal settings for the picture: - Landscape + Portrait: Suitable for taking photos of both you subject and background. The picture is taken with the background as well as the subject in the foreground in focus. - Landscape: Suitable for taking photos of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. Both the foreground and the background are in focus. Since blues and greens are reproduced vividly in this mode, the landscape mode is excellent for shooting natural scenery. - Portrait: Suitable for shooting a portrait-style image of a person. This mode features an in-focus subject against a blurred background. - Sports: Suitable for capturing fast-moving action such as sports scene or moving vehicles without blurring. - Night scene: Suitable for taking night scene photos with a slower shutter speed.

Sep 04, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-5060 Wide Zoom Digital...

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