Question about Hayward 1.5hp Pool Pump Motor Motor A O Smith Electric Pool Motor for 56j Frame Motors Ust1152

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Does it matter if use 220 or 115... looks like i have 25 amp in the box with gfi.. need connect the wire to back of the motor.. outside i have the big circular 3 pronged connection to the outlet... do i hook hot (black wire) to L1 and (white) to L2?

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220 VAC is more efficient ... so there is some cost savings in the money department. Volts X amp = watts generally ... there is still a savings because you will actually consume fewer watts at 220 (watts is what you are purchasing form the power company)

Wiring depends ...you going to use 110 or 220? if 110 ... black is hot and goes to L1 ... white is nutral and goes to L1.

If 220 ... black is hot and goes to L1 - white is hot and goes to L2.

Your owner manual has a good picture and description of this.

In the plug ... 110 - neutral should go to the left slot.

Is your breaker 110 or 220 (single pole or double pole - one slot or two slots)

These voltages are not compatable!

I suggest you use this pump at 220.

Posted on Jun 05, 2010

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    Thank you ... your remarks made my day!! ... Thanks for the 4 thumbs up ... good luck with your project ...



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    ops ... I was so excited to get the nice words I took the three thumbs for four thumbs ... Still, good luck with your project.

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Home fuse box breaker issue


Hi Rex,

It sounds as if the upstairs bathroom outlet and the outdoor outlet are on the same circuit. There's a very good chance that these are GFI or "ground fault interrupter" type outlets, as these locations (and others) have required this type of protection for over 30 years. It was a common practice to run a circuit from the panel to one of these locations (or another) and then run from here to the next outlet and then on to the next. Since the GFI outlet could be purchased for around $10 instead of $30 for a GFI breaker, electricians would install outlets instead - both offered the same protection. A "regular" breaker would supply power to this circuit - but the very first outlet would get a GFI type outlet. It would be wired to the LINE terminals and the cable that feeds the rest of the outlets on this circuit would be connected to the LOAD terminals. If there was a ground fault condition, this GFI outlet would trip, but the circuit breaker would remain on. You would locate and RESET the tripped GFI outlet to restore power. The only time the circuit breaker would trip is if the circuit was overloaded. Overloads would NOT cause the GFI outlet to trip.

Now that you understand how it was typically wired years ago (and still a lot of times today), you should check all the outlets outside your home, in bathrooms, basements, garages, and inside your home next to doorways that lead directly to grade of your lawn or deck. These are required places for GFI protection. Press the RESET on any tripped GFI outlet to restore power. If the outlet will not RESET, there is a condition where the hot wire (black, red or blue insulated wire) is in contact with ground, or a device or appliance connected to the circuit has a problem. Unplug anything connected to the circuit and attempt to RESET again. If still unable to reset, open the outdoor outlet again and carefully pull it out and away from the box. Inspected for damaged or crushed insulation and repair / tape as needed. Before reinstalling, try to reset again. If it holds, trip the GFI by pressing TEST button. The RESET button should pop out. Reinstall the outlet and make sure the wires are not crushed or cut. Press the RESET button again. If it trips, you will have to remove the outlet again and take more precautions against damage to the insulation. it is also possible that the GFI outlet itself has failed, in which case it should be replaced.

GFI circuit breakers and outlets are supposed to be tested monthly by simply pressing the TEST button and then the RESET button. Replace any GFI device that does not test correctly if wiring and devices / appliances connected are OK.

I hope this helps & good luck! Please rate my reply - thanks.

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My Sylvania - ground fault 15 amp breaker (32740) is tripping with minutes of reseting. It is for 3 washrooms & hallway & is 30 years old .....does or can it loose its life span? What is the cost...


A circuit breaker can go bad, but usually not in the way that you describe. That's not to say that it can't happen, but just not typical. GTE Sylvania breakers were once popular - I installed quite a few GTE / Sylvania electrical panels in homes in the late 80's. You may have trouble finding replacements; do not put an breaker that "fits" into the panel, unless the breaker is designed for use in the panel you have.

The first thing to do is determine the source of the problem. The breaker will trip, but not indicate if it was the result of a heavy electrical load or a ground fault condition. A 15 amp circuit breaker is designed to carry up to 12 amps continuously. The greater the load, the more quickly it will trip. it may carry a 14.5 amp load for several minutes to an hour before tripping, and a 20 amp load may be carried a second or two. GFI breakers are designed to carry 5 thousandths (.005) of an amp (or 5 milliamps) to ground, or the 12+ amps to neutral before they trip.

The way I would attack the problem is to install a new GFI outlet in front of the old wiring, by "inserting it" between the panel and the other plugs and lights, switches, etc on that circuit. The GFI outlet will provide the same GFI protection that the circuit breaker provided at a fraction of the cost.

Turn off the old GFI breaker, and remove it completely. Install a new, standard (non-GFI) single pole 15 amp circuit breaker in its place. Completely remove from the panel the cable that the old GFI breaker fed. Buy a new electrical outlet box (surface or flush mount as desired) that is large enough and deep enough for a GFI plug and 2 cables (if surface mount, use a 4" square deep box and appropriate cover - or if flush mounting use a deep plastic / fiber single gang box). It will be installed in a place close to the panel, but where the old cable will be able to reach inside. Bring the old cable removed from the panel into the new box. Run a new cable that has the same number and size wires from the panel into the new box, too. Connect the circuit neutral and circuit ground to the neutral and ground bars in the panel (they are probably the same bar) and the hot wire to the circuit breaker. make sure that the circuit breaker is OFF. Twist the two ground wires together and combine an 8 inch length of bare or green insulated wire with them in a wirenut.

Next, wire a new GFI plug in the new box. Connect the green wire from the wirenut to the green terminal of the GFI outlet.

Connect the plug's LINE terminals to the neutral and hot wires in the cable that you ran from the panel to the outlet box.

Now, connect the GFI plug's LOAD terminals to the neutral and hot wires in the cable that you removed from the panel and reinstalled into the new outlet box.

Secure the GFI outlet into the box and install the cover. Cover the electrical panel.

Power up and test. if the GFI trips, there's a ground fault in the circuit. If the circuit breaker trips, the circuit is overloaded.

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I have a GE two speed motor/pump for a hot tub that I have adapted for a type of therapy called underwater pressure massage (all of the hot tub jets are channeled through a single hose for the high...


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PS, Please rate me on my help to you. Thank you.

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Bought a used Leisure Bay hot tub and it is wired for 220 and I want to go back to 110. What do I need?


Reconsider ... Reconsider ...

My comments are general in nature since you have left out a lot of information to make this answer specific to your model.

What kind of load does this hot tub represent? It is probably heated electrically ... if that is the case, I would guess that the load is at least 50 amps on 220 V, maybe more, possibly less. If you convert to 110, your (amp) load will be at least twice that size! you will have to change the heater and the motor to run on 110, it will just not work as well as when running on 220. You may not be able to run the existing motor and heater on the lower voltage, requiring replacement (if available).

Your tub must be protected by a GFI (rated at 60 amps 220 volts) and the supply wire should be #6 three conductor with ground.

If you convert (if it is convertable at all) you will still need a GFI, it will have to be at least 100 amps and your power wire will be #2. I suspect you will not be able to make the attachment of #2 wire (or even #4, if it is legal in your area) to the tub due to size constraints in the connection box. Go to the store and take a look at these wires on the shelf. Aluminum #2 is the size of your finger and you would need three of them to connect at 110 volts.

220 volt 60 amp GFI at the big box store is about $90.00. Did you get wire with the tub? Is it #6, 3 conductor with ground (red/black/white/green)? Maybe #4? Will it reach your power source?

Unless there is space in your power panel for this large double pole GFI, you will likely have to have a sub panel installed. If you are very clever and skilled at working on power panels, you may be able to do this yourself. I suggest you have this done by a licensed electrician. In any event, I would encourage you to comply with the local codes in your community - which are in place for the protection of you and your family.

Look here for generic information on installation. Look in particular at page 3 of the instruction. http://www.premiumleisure.com/Manuals/nov07/ZSeriesSpaManual.pdf

While the picture shows small wire (for clarity?), it looks like #14 wire to me, in bold print, the instruction says use #6 wire, and it should be copper, NOT aluminum. If it is a long distance from the power panel to the tub, you may want to consider increasing the size to #4 to account for power drop. In this case, you would put a standard 220 V 60 amp breaker in the main panel and run #4 to the GFI in a sub panel that is located at least 5 feet away from the tub. The sub panel should be water tight and be lockable, if out of doors. You could run #6 from the GFI to the tub, if your local code allows.

My friend, just wiring this tub without modification is a big, expensive and potentially dangerous job, requiring expertise, knowledge and patience. Changing the heart and nerve system of this device is beyond the expertise of most home owners, if possible at all. Good luck with your project.

BTW, I am not a licensed electrician, though I do have extensive electrical experience, including installing and maintaining hundreds of power pedestals, residential and commercial wiring and power systems around swimming pools. I am a Certified Pool Operator ... and when the time comes, I would be glad to answer your water maintenance questions.

I do have and did install my own hot tub.

I hope this helps you with your question ... thanks for your interest in FixYa.com. If your found this information helpful, a positive vote would be appreciated.




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