Question about Bryant 463AAC005BA Air Conditioner

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Liquid line is cool coming from condenser indoor air not cold enough. Unit runs constantly at temps of 90 to maintain 80 inside

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If the compressor is running at 90 there should be hot air coming out of the condensing units fan, if not it could be damaged valves in the compressor especially if the suction line is colder than normal like ice cold.
Obviously if the compressor is not running then you have other electrical problems.

Posted on Jun 03, 2010

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Rheem split system condenser high pressure limit/safety needs resetting frequently before it reaches the set temp of 76 degrees faren. what's wrong and what do i need to check?


Is the outdoor fan running? The fan cools the coils and compressor, therefore keeping the high pressure low enough to run. Either the fan is not working or its not spinning fast enough. Check the capacitor, or just replace it.

Apr 18, 2017 | Heating & Cooling

Tip

How Heat Pumps Work


How on earth can you get hot air or hot water from very cold outside air? How does a heat pump make this heat out of cold air?
When certain gases change their state from a liquid to a gas or from a gas to a liquid the magic happens.

A heat pump can do some pretty amazing things, when it comes to making heat. To understand the way they work, you must first understand what happens when certain gases change from a liquid state to a gas and back to a liquid again. To simplify it a bit we need to look at a basic air conditioning system. The refrigerant in an air conditioning system is changing to a liquid in the outdoor condenser. The compressor compresses the gas forming a hot gas. As this gas cools under high pressure it changes into a liquid form.

Inside the indoor coil the liquid is pushed through a small hole or orifice. When it comes out the other side it rapidly changes it’s state to a gas as the pressure suddenly drops. The rapid pressure drop changes the refrigerant to a very cold gas. Air flowing over the cold gas inside the pipes makes the air cool and provides air conditioning.


Now for a heat pump the process is much the same, only coils are just switched by used a reversing valve in the outdoor condenser unit. Instead of the heat being purged to the outside from the condenser unit, the indoor unit then becomes the condenser coil. The outdoor coil becomes the cold coil and cools the outside. This is why if it is very cold outside the unit will have to run in air conditioning mode for a short time to defrost the outside cold coil. When this happens the system will usually have electric heat inside to run and keep the indoor air warm.

The reality is that a heat pump is really no more than an air conditioner running in reverse. Through the magic of using refrigerants, a heat pump can then run many times more efficiently than straight electric heat. A careful heat loss/gain should always be performed by a qualified service person before any sizing of a unit. Too large or too small of a heat pump system can make it inefficient and possibly cause it to be very uncomfortable. The longevity of the unit can also be affected by sizing and installation. Be patient and look carefully for the best contractor to install your system.

A properly designed and installed heat pump system can give you many years of comfort and efficiency. If you look for and find the contractor that can do the job right you will get many trouble free comfortable years from your heat pump unit.

on Dec 29, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

Tip

Why your unit is freezing up.


To understand why your AC or heat pump is freezing up, it helps to know how your system works.

There are 7 major parts to an AC system, 9 with a heat pump.

1 - Condenser/heat pump (The outdoor unit)
2 - Air Handler (the indoor unit unless the system is a package unit, then all is outside in one system. The air handler is usually found under the home, in an attic, or in a closet.)

In the condenser are the following major parts.

3 - Compressor
4 - Condenser coil
5 - Condenser fan
6 - (HPs only) reversing valve

In the air handler are the following major parts.

7 - Blower motor
8 - Evaporator coil
9 - (HPs only) electric heat strips

Some systems known as "dual fuel systems" use another heat source in place of the heat strips, usually a gas furnace. I will address gas furnaces in another post.

When an air conditioner is operating properly several things are taking place.

1 - The compressor is compressing or "pumping" refrigerant through the system.

2 - through changes in pressure, the refrigerant makes the evaporator coil get very cold, and the condenser coil gets very hot.

3 - The blower motor/fan circulates air across the evaporator coils, as the room temperature air (Also known as "indoor ambient") goes through the cold coil, it exits, cooled approximately 15 to 20 degrees cooler than when it entered. (In a ducted system, the blower is also the fan that circulates the air throughout the home.)

4 - The condenser fan circulates air across the condenser coils. As the outdoor air goes through the condenser coil, it removes heat from the coils that are very hot. This in turn removes heat from the refrigerant so it can run its cycle again, and through pressure changes, cool the evap coil.

5 - With a heat pump, the reversing valve reverses the flow of refrigerant in the condenser and evaporator coils.
In AC mode, the evaporator coils get cold, and the condenser coils get hot. But in heat mode, the evaporator gets very hot, and the condenser very cold.

Now, whichever coil is getting cold will freeze up if there is inadequate air flow across the coil, as the refrigerant in it is far below freezing, and there is not enough airflow to keep the humidity in the air from freezing on the coil.

Things that can cause poor airflow are,

1 - Dirty/clogged coils
2 - dirty/clogged filter (will only effect evaporator coil)
3 - Closed/blocked vents (will only effect evaporator coil)
4 - Malfunctioning or dirty fan

Low refrigerant will also cause a coil to freeze up, reduce efficiency and cause the system to run for long periods of time. Not to mention, shortening the life of the unit.

With a heat pump, in heat mode only, the condenser (outdoor) coil will routinely begin to freeze up in cold temperatures. This is due to the fact that the refrigerant is below freezing, and the cold outdoor ambient temp is not warm enough to keep the condensation in the air from freezing on the coil.

Note, a properly working AC should never freeze up.

A heat pump is equipped with defrost controls to prevent ice buildup.
Some are controlled by timers, some by temp.

When a HP is going into defrost mode, the condenser fan shuts down, the reversing valve reverses the flow of refrigerant and the once cold condenser coil now gets very hot, defrosting the coil. (Many people have said this process sounds like the unit is coming apart, or about to explode and are frightened by the "smoke" which is really just steam from melting ice that comes off the unit.)

During defrost mode, the secondary or "auxiliary" heat comes on to ensure that you are still getting warm air from the vents. (Again, this can be electric heat strips or a dual fuel system)

If you are experiencing cold air from the vents during defrost, that means your auxiliary heat is malfunctioning.

The auxiliary heat is used for three purposes.

1 - during defrost mode to maintain warm airflow (automatic)
2 - when the HP cannot maintain the set temp due to extreme outdoor temps. It comes on when the indoor temp drops several degrees below the set temp on the thermostat (automatic)
3 - For emergency heat source when the HP is not working. (Manual)

To recap....

Iced up coils?

Poor airflow
low refrigerant
Malfunctioning fan
failing defrost system


There are two things that can be done in a pinch to help de-ice frozen coils. This may get you by until the repairman can get there, or you can fix the system if you are a do-it-yourselfer.

HPs frozen outdoor coil in heat mode, not going into defrost?

Cover most of the vents, and turn the system onto cooling mode until the outdoor coil is thawed. then uncover vents and return to heat, or emergency heat. (this usually takes 15 min or less)

Frozen coils in AC mode with a heat pump?
Turn the system to heat with the thermostat on just high enough to get the system to come on. (again, usually takes 15 min or less to thaw.)

AC only, with frozen evap coils? (this can sometimes be seen frozen all the way outside to the compressor on the copper lines.)

Turn the system off, and the fan switch from "auto" to on".
This will usually defrost the coils within 1 to 2 hours.
(If your system has the furnace in line before the evap coil, turn the system to heat, and the furnace will defrost the coil within minutes.)



on Dec 25, 2008 | Carrier XHB123D X/Y Series Heat/Cool Air...

1 Answer

There is no cool air coming through my vents from my Lennox Hp13 heat pump. Only room temperature air seems to come through.What might be wrong?


Due to the many different questions I see about Air Conditioning, I am including this overview to help us better understand each other for trouble shooting. A basic air conditioning system has a Thermostat, Air Handler or Furnace Fan and a Condensing unit. In a split system, the condensing unit (Condenser) is separate from the furnace and usually in the back yard. When working properly, it blows hot air. It connects to the cooling part of the system by 2 copper lines. One large line and 1 small line. The part that cools the house is the "Evaporator" and is usually on top of the furnace inside the square metal box (Plenum). When the Air Conditioner is running, the large copper line should be cold and the smaller line should be warm. Common signs of low refrigerant are that both lines are the same temperature and/or frost or ice has built up on the large line at the condenser. The thermostat will normally display room temperature on till it is touched to change the setting. It could have a "Span" setting as well as times and temperatures. The operating "span" of MOST residential thermostats is 40 to 90 degrees. That means you can set it as low as 40 degrees and no higher than 90 degrees. It probably has a fan switch also. When in the "ON" position, the fan will run constantly, 24 / 7, but the condenser will still cycle on and off as needed to keep the house at set point. If you have a suggestion to include in this paragraph, please let me know.

Take a look at everything above. Let me know what type of help you need. Roger

Apr 10, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

Have an Amana air command 80 sse... and a HOT house! The AC comes on for a few minutes and then shuts off. The filter is clean... am wondering if there's a reset button. I have looked all around and...


Due to the many different questions I see about Air Conditioning, I am including this overview to help us better understand each other for trouble shooting. A basic air conditioning system has a Thermostat, Air Handler or Furnace Fan and a Condensing unit. In a split system, the condensing unit (Condenser) is separate from the furnace and usually in the back yard. When working properly, it blows hot air. It connects to the cooling part of the system by 2 copper lines. One large line and 1 small line. The part that cools the house is the "Evaporator" and is usually on top of the furnace inside the square metal box (Plenum). When the Air Conditioner is running, the large copper line should be cold and the smaller line should be warm. Common signs of low refrigerant are that both lines are the same temperature and/or frost or ice has built up on the large line at the condenser. The thermostat will normally display room temperature on till it is touched to change the setting. It could have a "Span" setting as well as times and temperatures. The operating "span" of MOST residential thermostats is 40 to 90 degrees. That means you can set it as low as 40 degrees and no higher than 90 degrees. It probably has a fan switch also. When in the "ON" position, the fan will run constantly, 24 / 7, but the condenser will still cycle on and off as needed to keep the house at set point. If you have a suggestion to include in this paragraph, please let me know. Roger

Most condensing units have low pressure safety switches in them. If your system is low on refrigerant, the compressor will run a little and shut off. When the pressures across the compressor equalize, it will come back on. This cycle will repeat on till enough gas has leaked to stop resetting the pressure switch. If this is what is happening, shut the condenser off. Short cycling will over heat the compressor. You will need a technician to find and fix the leak. Also to recharge your system when repaired. Let me know if I failed to help. Roger

Apr 10, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

My whirlpool acq128xp0 runs great one day, then barely starts the second day, It doesnt have the air volume or cooling it use too. Just started this year. Mike


Mike, when you stated it barely starts, to what are you referring? The compressor (condenser) section has an issue when starting or the indoor fan is hard to start?

If the fan does run, and the condenser unit outside is operating and you are getting lower than usual air flow (compared to previously), you may have a dirty filter, or you may have other obstructions at the evap coil inside the furnace or air handler. It could also be the unit is freezing up and ice on the evap coil is cutting down the air flow. Chances are if the coil is freezing over, you will have two issue that cause this:

Air flow issues (dirty coil, clogged air filter, or other obstructions across the evap coil, such as a plastic bag or pet hair, dust, ect.) which will also cause the coil to freeze over.

The other issue that would cause the low air flow is ice that is a result of low refrigerant.

If the system ran fine in the past, I will rule out it may be inproperly sized. Have you recently had a fan motor replaced on the indoor unit. If so, and they under sized the fan motor, then it could be the fan is not drawing, or blowing enough air across the evaporator coil and this will cause it to freeze over.

Look for ice on the suction line (piping) which is the bigger of the two lines coming from the outside unit (condensing unit). It is also the line that has the insulation covering it. If it has ice on it, then freezing is occuring on the evaporator. If so, then airflow issues, or refrigerant levels are usually the main culprits.

The two lines (suction and liquid) running between your indoor and outdoor unit should feel the following way to the touch of your hand:

Suction should be cold and possibly sweating if exposed (in places where no insulation is present).

Liquid line (smaller line) should be warm to the touch, but not too hot, or too cool. Should feel close to the outside ambient temperature if felt by hand.

Look these issues over and let me know.

Scott

Sep 04, 2010 | Whirlpool Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Ok..here's one. I have entire air duct system that is condensating ON THE OUTSIDE, UNDERNEATH. I noticed the problem before and after cleaning the coil in a closet air handler. Air runs fine, cools normal....


not moving enough air or duct work is in a unconditioned space and needs to be insulate. what are your freon pressures, suction and liquid line temps, and indoor wetbulb

Sep 20, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

Indoor unit temperature between 60F & 70F after R22 charge..


The pressure changes with temperature, it is not a true gauge to ensure a proper charge.

You should have a 15 to 20 degree temp drop across the evap coil. (return air vs supply air)

Can you verify that the compressor is running?
Not the condenser, but the compressor located inside the condenser (outdoor unit)

it really sounds like it is still undercharged.
Check the temp drop, let me know what it is.
Also tell me what the outdoor ambient temp is.

( for example.... 98 degree outdoors with 85 degree indoor temp could result in pressures something like 325 on the high side and 75 or 80 on the low side.
With the exact same unit, but 80 degree outdoor temp combined with 70 degree indoor temp, your pressures could read 215 low side and 55 low side. Not to mention that more efficient units often have higher pressures on the low side because they have more coil space and remove heat more efficiently)

Aug 21, 2009 | Sanyo Split System Air Conditioner

1 Answer

Ac problems


Hello from KOOLBREEZES, this is a simle problem and easy to fix. You have 2-lines going to / from your outside unit. a SMALL COPPER -line and a LARGE COPPER line with insulations. The fat line is suppose to have moisture on it wheres it,s not insulated which tells you you have enough refrigerant gas comming back to he compressor but if its dry you,re low on freon and need a charge or the outside condenser is dirty and not getting rid of enough heat!

Jun 02, 2008 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Freezer runs constantly


not necessarily, is it maintaining temp? all food staying frozen? especially ice creams if stored in there. most newer freezers displace the heat generated while cooling the food through copper lines running through sides of unit, helps to cut down on air temp differences between the inside (0 degrees) and outside temp to prevent moisture and possible condensation causing premature rusting of unit

Mar 02, 2008 | Kenmore 14.1 cu. ft. / 399 liter Upright...

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