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How to install 80 conductor cable? because when i turn on my computer it displays no 80 conductor cable installed

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It means you're still using the 40 conductor cable from the MB IDE to the
hard drive. The 80 Conductor Cables are used to take advantage of the newer
Ultra/ATA-66 and up IDE drives. (They will still work with the 40
conductor cable, but slower.)

Posted on Jun 02, 2010

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2 Answers

How do i set the jumper when installing diamond max plus 9 80gb as a 2nd disk what does cs enabled mean thank you


CS means Cable Select .Parallel data cable have two conectors.If you set jumper set on CS ,in this way ,example,you have two HDD when you plug parallel data cable in middle connector ,1 Hard drive working like Master ,2 HDD work like slave,if you plug in last connector First HDD working like slave,second HDD Master.
http://www.tacktech.com/display.cfm?ttid=379

Aug 04, 2010 | Maxtor Hard Drive

3 Answers

How do i install a used hard drive into an eMachines T2341? The hard drive still has information on it. do i set it as master, slave, or cable select? hard drive is an IBM 10.1 gb


There are two possible solutions depending on how your desktop is setup.
#1 install the 2nd hard drive and put jumper to CABLE SELECT. When you start the computer it should now appear in the bios as a SLAVE or 2nd hard drive. If not go to #2 below
#2 Turn system off again and change jumper on 2nd hard drive to SLAVE.
Now when your computer restarts it will appear in your bios correctly as the 2nd drive/SLAVE.
Do not make it "MASTER" or you will be trying to boot up to this drive and it may not work as you planned.

FYI: "Cable Select" means the hard drive determines which one is Master and which one is Slave by where it is on the data cable.

Good Luck

Dec 30, 2009 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

How can i swap the C: drive to the D; Drive and the D; Drive to my C; Drive, in other words make my computer think that my D; drive is my main hard drive?


I can answer you question presuming you have IDE drives ... but ...

where is your operating system? Do you know how to change this from old C to new C?????

An IDE drive can be identified by a wide gray ribbon cable. They come in 40 conductor and 80 conductor versions.

If you have the 80, your computer uses a "cable select" method to choose C and D. Remove both, the one that was D goes on the end of the cable and will become C. The one that was C goes between C and the mother board. On the back of your drives, you should already have shorted "Cable Select"

If you have a 40 conductor cable, you will have to change the shorting pins. Instructions should be on the top of the drive (diagrans to show what pins to short) If you have an extra shorting device when you are done, leave it on a single pin in case you need it later.

I hope this helps you ... and remember, you still need an operating system.

I guess you could (stress COULD) go into the BIOS and make D the the boot device ... but im not real excited about this. There are a hundred things that could mess this up, starting with the default paths that all software come with.

Let me know how you make out ...

a

Oct 01, 2009 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

I chang hard drive .imoved all cards . my computer open v


If your hard disk is IDE then use 80-Conductor Cable for fast speed. If your hard disk is SATA then you just download and install the latest driver of your motherboard by which many problem can be solved including your hard disk transfer rate.
If this step is not helpful then please try to format your system and then install the latest driver.

Dec 16, 2008 | Intel Desktop Board D845GLVA...

1 Answer

More problems lol


Hy Ashley,

First up,
Your channel 1 no 80 conductor cable,
tell me that you have mounted a new HDD to your computer,
- -
If there isn't a 80 wire cable, then the drive that came with the box was not a speedy one.
If you only have a 40 wire cable the drive will be limited to 33MB/s transfer versus 100 or 133MB/s that's possible with the 80 wire cable.

With the 40's, all the wires are signal carriers (potentially). With the 80's, there is a ground wire between each signal wire to prevent bleed over. Bleed over can affect signal integrity, cause errors, and slow down performance.

you can fix that in one of two ways(or maybe both):-):

1. Go into your BIOS, and set it to run the hard drive auto detection to make sure its not holding on to any old hard drive settings.


2. Make sure that all connections are tight. You might want to try a different cable and if you do make sure it is the 80 wire type. The connectors on the 80 wire are colored (black,blue and gray)

The part with it telling you about your CPU is just a part of the testing procedure.

kind regards
/Teis
remember to vote

Dec 12, 2008 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Installed a new Optical Drive and require assistance in the wiring


What kind of optical drive? Is this a CD, DVD?, Blue ray,
or an opto-ferro-magnetic floppy?

Generally:

1) External drive:
============
a) just power it up and connect it to the PC using an USB
or firewire (1394) cable. If it is USB, make sure your PC
is set up for USB-2 which is astronomically faster.

b) The windows operating system should automatically
detect it and install the low level device drivers.
Then you can run the installation driver CD that came
with the drive.

2) Internal drive:
==========

a) Shut down Windows from the START menu,
chose shut down the system, NOT restart.

b) When it finishes shutting down, turn of the
power at the back (!) of the PC and unplug
the power cord.

Now turn the power switch back on for a few
with the cord unplugged, then shut it off again.

This will drain any internal capacitors inside the
power supply to make sure you don't fry anything
while you poke around.

c) Open up the computer case and look to see where
the other hard drives are installed and physically
mount the new optical drive inside the case.

d) Locate a spare power cable coming from the power
supply (Black, Red and Yellow wires) and hook it
into the back of the drive.

It should only fit one way, but there are several
different kinds of connectors, depending on the
drive type, so you may need an adapter cable.

i) Large 4 pin connector = Red, Yellow, Black, Black
ii) Miniature -//- = -//-
iii) SATA power cable = Small black hooked beastie.

Also make sure the power supply can handle
the extra current, this depends on the other stuff
such as drives and video card you already have in
the machine.

If your power supply is less than 600W on a modern
machine, now may be the time to upgrade it.

I have two video cards, 8 hard drives and a DVD,
so I had to upgrade to a 1000W to prevent my
system from randomly crashing during boot up,
when everything spins up for a self-test.

e) Once the power is connected, you need to connect
the data cable, which comes in a least 3 different
types:

IDE or PATA = Parallel ATA ribbon cable

SATA = Serial ATA cable, small flat cable with a red,
blue or orange jacket, and small black
hooked connectors at each end.

Note that these are a different size and
shape from the SATA power cables.

SCSI = pronounce scuzzi, no longer common.

One end of this data cable connects to the back of the
optical drive, the other to the motherboard, but this is
where it gets more complicated, because the mother
boards are fussy about which slot you plug them into.

You need to follow your motherboard manual here (HP) !

For SATA cables, you have to make sure that the motherboard
can handle them, older motherboards cannot, requiring an
adapter card. Also many of the new motherboards offer
multiple drive configurations such as RAID.

=============================
RAID = Redundant Array of Independent Drives:
RAID 0 = STRIPE for high speed at the cost of security
RAID 1 = MIRROR for data redundancy at the cost of $ cost
RAID 01 = Stripe of mirrors
RAID 10 = Mirror of stripes
RAID 5 = Stripe with parity compromise
etc...
=============================

Anyway, the problem is that on these mother boards some
of the SATA connectors are general purpose (which is what
you need), while others are not (i.e dedicated RAID),

and you may have to change jumpers on the board
or BIOS settings to get it to work right.

Also if the optical drive is to be bootable, then it sould
be connected to SATA1 or SATA2, but that again depends
on the motherboard and the BIOS boot sequence settings.

===

With the older style IDE or PATA drives, which includes most
optical drives (since SATA is fairly recent), most motherboards
provide two separate IDE ports, each of which can handle a
pair of drives for a total of four.

IDE1, Master = Drive 0
IDE1, Slave = Drive 1
IDE2, Master = Drive 2
IDE2, Master = Drive 3

Each pair of drives shares a single ribbon cable.
Older cables have 40 conductors,
Newer cables have 80 conductors for UDMA.

While the end connectors are the same, only 40 conductors,
the 80 conductor cables have interlaced grounding, which
allows them to transfer data at a higher speed.

Older optical drives used the 40 conductor, newer ones
use the 80 conductor, but there is no harm done using
the 80. If the ribbon cable came with the optical dive,
you can use it if you are plugging it into a separate IDE
port, BUT

Never use a 40 conductor ribbon cable if it is shared between
the optical and the hard drive, because this will slow down
the hard drive to the lower UDMA speed.

Now about the Master Slave thing:
=========================
1) Each PATA=IDE port can only handle one master/ slave pair.

2) You must never connect two MASTERS or two SLAVES
to the same cable.

3) The boot hard drive must be a MASTER on IDE1
for most systems, unless the BIOS has a way
remapping them.

4) When a hard drive and an optical drive share the same
IDE port and cable, the hard drive should be the MASTER,
for maximum speed, optical drives are often slower.

5) IDE hard drives and optical drives use a set of
jumpers near the IDE connector to determine if they
act as a MASTER or a SLAVE. This should be set before
you install them, because it is very hard to get at the
jumpers afterwards:

MASTER this forces the drive to act as a MASTER
SLAVE this forces the drive to act as a SLAVE

CABLE SELECT special color coded ribbon cables
(80 conductor) must be used to make this work.
These now come with most new motherboards.

The blue connector at the far end of the cable, away from
the other two goes into the motherboard.

The black connector at the opposite end (near the gray one)
goes into the MASTER drive.

The gray connector in the middle goes to the SLAVE drive.
(both drives should be setup as CABLE SELECT for this to
work)

When connecting the ribbon cable to the IDE drive, make sure
the PIN 1, the marked side of the ribbon goes near the power
connector. On the mother board, the marked of the ribbon
connector goes into PIN 1. The connector should be keyed
to only fit one way, but don't count on it.

Hope this get you started,

Martin

BTW please rate my answers.

Jun 14, 2008 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

MS 6712 motherboard


check the cables, and if all connection pins are on the drives or on the motherboard. Not all the needed communication routs between the drives and the motherboard are working....
U can also try another IDE slot (if more than 1)
If all checks ok, try a BIOS reset... (but most probably is just the cables ...)

Jan 20, 2008 | Intel Motherboard

1 Answer

Installed new Pioneer DVR-112D


 Are you using an 80-conductor type ribbon cable? The new drive requires 80-conductor cable. Plus, you may need to switch the jumper on the back of the DVR drive to CS.

I just found your motherboard specs
http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?product=396434&lang=en&lc=en&cc=us&dlc=en&docname=c00063272

It uses SATA and Ultra DMA (80-conductor).
Is the jumper set to master?? You may need to pull the jumper off and see if the DVR drive works with it off.

Oct 29, 2007 | BenQ CRW 4012A (99.B9712.036) CD-RW Burner

1 Answer

MSI P4MAM2-V BIOS


Check your Ide data cable it seems 40 pin conductor cable .

Replace them with 80 pin conductor cable.your problen\m has gone.

Oct 13, 2007 | MSI P4MAM2-V Motherboard

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