Question about Seagate (ST380011A) 80 GB IDE Hard Drive

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Hard drive my hard drive has 2 partitions, I just want one, and the one i use has not enough space. Do I need to wipe it altogether and reinstall all the software, XP word internet etc? John

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  • John Blair Apr 09, 2008

    Thanks for the reply Lolita, I tried downloading the trial version of Partition Magic, but it would not download for some reason, will try later. Elslicko

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There is no need to wipe all the data on the partition, you can just use a free partition software to merge the two partitions into a bigger one, you can try AOMEI Partition Assistant. http://www.extend-partition.com/free-partition-manager.html
in Winodws xp, there is no extending function, although you wipe the whole partition, it cannot be added to another partition.

Posted on Sep 12, 2012

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Hi,
You can install a software called partition magic and use it to merge the two partitions into one.
But you might need to free some space on your C drive. What you can do is copy (CUT) all your My Documents data and paste it to your D drive or your second drive. This should free a lot of space enough to install partition magic.

You can download the trial version software from http://www.soft32.com/download_151.html
Install it and merge your partitions and then you can uninstall or purchase if you want.

Lolita

Posted on Apr 08, 2008

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4 Answers

Laptop C partition low disk space error


You can try and compress your file this will give you 15 to 20 percent more space. Also, download CCleaner and run it this will also help clean up disk space. And run disk cleaner and last run a defrag

Nov 27, 2014 | Toshiba Computers & Internet

Tip

How to Dual Boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista





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If you're dying to try out Windows 7 but aren't ready to give up your installation of XP or Vista, let's take a look at how to dual boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista.



Assuming you've already downloaded a fresh copy of Windows 7, you'll need to burn it to a DVD in order to do a fresh installation. To handle this task, grab a copy of the most popular CD and DVD burning tool ImgBurn, burn the ISO to a DVD, and move right along to step 1.



Step 1: Partition Your Hard Drive Before you go installing Windows 7, the first thing you need to do is create a new partition on your hard drive to hold the new installation of Windows. Partitioning your hard drive will vary depending on whether you're running XP or Vista—namely because Vista has a partition tool baked in, XP does not.
Partition Your Hard Drive in XP To partition your hard drive in Windows XP, you'll need to download some sort of third-party partitioning software. There are a lot of options available, but I prefer to stick with the previously mentioned GParted live CD, a free, open source boot CD that can handle all kinds of partitioning duties.


To use it, just download the GParted Live CD, burn it to a CD, then reboot your computer (booting from the disc). You'll boot right into the partitioning tool. HowtoForge's previous guide to modifying partitions with GParted is a great place to start, but it's a fairly basic procedure:
  1. Resize your current OS drive to free up enough space for a Windows 7 partition (the minimum system requirements ask for 16GB).
  2. Create a new partition from the newly freed space.
  3. Apply your changes.
Partition Your Hard Drive in Vista The folks at Redmond were kind enough to include a disk partitioning tool in Vista if you know where to look. So go to Control Panel -> System and Maintainence (skip this one if you're in Classic view) -> Administrative Tools -> Computer Management. Once you launch the Computer Management tool, click on Disk Management under the Storage heading in the sidebar. It's partitioning time.

Luckily we've already gone down this road before in step-by-step detail, complete with pictures, so check out our previous guide to creating a new partition in Vista. In a nutshell, you'll need to shrink your current OS partition to free up at least 16GB of disk space (per the Windows 7 minimum system requirements), then create a "New Simple Volume" from the free space. Step 2: Install Windows 7 Now that you've done all the heavy lifting, it's time for the easy part: Installing Windows 7 on your new partition. So insert your Windows 7 disc and reboot your computer (you'll need to have enabled booting from your DVD drive in your system BIOS, but most PCs will have this enabled by default).

Once the DVD boots up it's a simple matter of following along with the fairly simple installation wizard. When you're choosing installation type, be sure to select Custom (advanced) and choose the partition you set up above. (Be careful here. Choosing the wrong partition could mean wiping your other Windows installation altogether, so make sure you pick the new partition you just created.) After you select the partition, go grab yourself a drink and let the installer do its work. Windows will run through some installation bits, restart a few times in the process. Eventually you'll be prompted to set up your account, enter your license key, and set up Windows. Keep your eyes open for fun new Windows 7 features, like your new homegroup (and the accompanying password). When it's finished, you're up and rolling with your new Windows 7 installation.

Congratulations! You should now have a new entry for Windows 7 on your boot screen when you first start up your computer. You've now got all the tools necessary to dual-boot Windows 7 and XP or Vista—or even to triple-boot Windows 7, Vista, and XP.


































on Jul 07, 2010 | Computers & Internet

Tip

How to Dual Boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista


If you're dying to try out Windows 7 but aren't ready to give up your installation of XP or Vista, let's take a look at how to dual boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista.
Step 0: Download the Windows 7 Beta and Burn It to a DVD
Assuming you've already downloaded a fresh copy of Windows 7, you'll need to burn it to a DVD in order to do a fresh installation. To handle this task, grab a copy of the most popular CD and DVD burning tool ImgBurn, burn the ISO to a DVD, and move right along to step 1.

Step 1: Partition Your Hard Drive
Before you go installing Windows 7, the first thing you need to do is create a new partition on your hard drive to hold the new installation of Windows. Partitioning your hard drive will vary depending on whether you're running XP or Vista—namely because Vista has a partition tool baked in, XP does not.
Partition Your Hard Drive in XP
To partition your hard drive in Windows XP, you'll need to download some sort of third-party partitioning software. There are a lot of options available, but I prefer to stick with the previously mentioned GParted live CD, a free, open source boot CD that can handle all kinds of partitioning duties.
To use it, just download the GParted Live CD, burn it to a CD, then reboot your computer (booting from the disc). You'll boot right into the partitioning tool. HowtoForge's previous guide to modifying partitions with GParted is a great place to start, but it's a fairly basic procedure:
Resize your current OS drive to free up enough space for a Windows 7 partition (the minimum system requirements ask for 16GB).
Create a new partition from the newly freed space.
Apply your changes.
Partition Your Hard Drive in Vista
The folks at Redmond were kind enough to include a disk partitioning tool in Vista if you know where to look. So go to Control Panel -> System and Maintainence (skip this one if you're in Classic view) -> Administrative Tools -> Computer Management. Once you launch the Computer Management tool, click on Disk Management under the Storage heading in the sidebar. It's partitioning time.
Luckily we've already gone down this road before in step-by-step detail, complete with pictures, so check out our previous guide to creating a new partition in Vista. In a nutshell, you'll need to shrink your current OS partition to free up at least 16GB of disk space (per the Windows 7 minimum system requirements), then create a "New Simple Volume" from the free space.
Step 2: Install Windows 7
Now that you've done all the heavy lifting, it's time for the easy part: Installing Windows 7 on your new partition. So insert your Windows 7 disc and reboot your computer (you'll need to have enabled booting from your DVD drive in your system BIOS, but most PCs will have this enabled by default).
Once the DVD boots up it's a simple matter of following along with the fairly simple installation wizard. When you're choosing installation type, be sure to select Custom (advanced) and choose the partition you set up above. (Be careful here. Choosing the wrong partition could mean wiping your other Windows installation altogether, so make sure you pick the new partition you just created.)
After you select the partition, go grab yourself a drink and let the installer do its work. Windows will run through some installation bits, restart a few times in the process. Eventually you'll be prompted to set up your account, enter your license key, and set up Windows. Keep your eyes open for fun new Windows 7 features, like your new homegroup (and the accompanying password). When it's finished, you're up and rolling with your new Windows 7 installation.
Congratulations! You should now have a new entry for Windows 7 on your boot screen when you first start up your computer. You've now got all the tools necessary to dual-boot Windows 7 and XP or Vista—or even to triple-boot Windows 7, Vista, and XP.

on Dec 08, 2009 | Computers & Internet

3 Answers

Laptop C partition low disk space


Make sure your hard disk has enough space. Most often when the error massage comes it will tell you how much free space is required to install the game look keenly and know how much space is required then either move all media files mainly video files especially downloaded in the download folder to an alternative partition and only leave windows and installed program on Local Disk C. Other wise if your hard disk capacity is very small then am afraid that you will have to get a bigger hard disk.

Nov 27, 2014 | Computers & Internet

7 Answers

How can I extend my C partition to remove its low disk space problem?


The partitions D,E and F may system partitions for tools like system restore and diagnostics. I would suggest removing some stuff from C:, if that is not an option you could consider a hard drive upgrade.

Oct 17, 2014 | Computers & Internet

4 Answers

Not enough memory


If you have low memory (RAM) then install more RAM.
If you have low memory (hard disk space) the delete unwanted data files and uninstall unwanted programs.
ALSO
Carry out HARD DISK MAINTENANCE
Hard disk maintenance should be carried once a month to make your computer run efficiently. This removes redundant and temporary files, recovers disk space and speed up hard disk access. Disk Cleanup should be done first - Click My Computer - then right click on the C drive then click Properties, then click Disk Cleanup - let it examine the C drive then it will calculate the amount of disk space it will recover, tick all the boxes to recover the maximum disk space and then Click OK and then Yes to perform these actions. If you have a D drive then repeat these steps on this drive too. Next the C drive needs to be Defrag. This process converts fragmented files into continuous files and this speeds up disk access and makes the hard disk not work as hard. Click on Start - All Programs - Accessories - System Tools - Disk Defragmenter - click to highlight the C drive and click Analyse - then click Defragment. When this is completed repeat these steps for the D Drive if you have a D drive. Disk Cleanup and Defrag can take a long time to complete, especially if these tasks have not been for a long time.

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3 Answers

MY COMPUTER SAYS NOT ENOUGH DISK SPACE AND THERE IS


2Gb hard drive is no good for storage or much else its very small best off changing it to a much bigger one 120GB or 250GB to be honest this will solve the problem

Feb 11, 2012 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

I had reinstall windows,now i only have 1%of disc space


You allocation of partion is too low while the time of os boot , so the only way is you have to change partion space , use this number during partition 60555 MB this 60GB so you cant get full easily , you have to run the DOS mode booting then only you can get the partition location , you may be runned the os from normal opening cd setup mode from already booted os , for further clarifications reply me , i will help you , thank you , dont forget to vote for me .

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2 Answers

MY C drive Booting drive is 30GB, in side c drive file properties is showing 20GB bt free space is showing 2GB


Its probably formatted not to use the entire space of the disk, is there another partition or "D" drive where your restore/backup stuff is? That could be take up the rest of the space. Hard disks are always described as being a certain size but can be formatted by windows tlo split up the drive into smaller chunks called partitions. Your C drive/partition might be way less then 30Gb therefore only showing up as 22Gb

May 17, 2009 | Smartdisk - Peripherals - HARD DRIVE,...

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