Question about Dell Optiplex GX60 PC Desktop

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Cpu died no heat sink temp. I have a gx60 SFF

Cpu died no heat sink temp. I have a gx60 SFF 69791 motherboard 478b socket I have all p/s voltages. I tried two chips a celeron 2.4 and a p 42.4 cpu chip there is 1.525v Vcc for VID on pin af4 but the system will not come up there is no temp change that I can register on the cpu heat sink. what else can I check or is the MB dead?
Thanks

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  • c d holiday Jun 02, 2010

    on the contrary the MB is still good the problem was that the chips were not seating into the 478 socket with the heat sink attached ( hard heat sink compound) Once I separated the two by using a hair dryer to heat the heat sink the compound became soft. Reseating the chip properly adding new heat compound, then locking down the heat sink all is now well and working. I found a replacement gx60 MB # 69791 on ebay for $17.00 faster chip for $16.00 heat sink for $16.00 better AGP video for 8.00 thanks anyway

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Yep your mb has gone to mb heaven and good luck on finding one to replace it I own three and they are extremely hard to find, unless you want to buy it from dell and they will charge you double for it.

Posted on Jun 01, 2010

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Toshiba p300 manuel


How to take apart a Toshiba Satellite P305 and Satellite P300 series notebook.

In this case I'm working on a Toshiba Satellite P305 notebook. Also, you can use same set of instructions for taking apart a Toshiba Satellite P300 notebook.




12_21_2011_2_32_33_pm.jpg

STEP 1

Turn off the laptop, unplug the power adapter and remove the battery.

In the battery compartment remove three screws securing the keyboard bezel.




12_21_2011_2_32_57_pm.jpg

STEP 2

Remove the keyboard bezel with a small flathead screwdriver.





12_21_2011_2_33_33_pm.jpg

STEP 3

Remove two screws from the keyboard.



12_21_2011_2_33_55_pm.jpg

STEP 4

Lift up the keyboard as it shown on the picture and place it upside down on the palm rest


12_21_2011_2_34_17_pm.jpg

STEP 5

Unlock the connector on the motherboard and release the keyboard cable.
Remove the keyboard. \


12_21_2011_2_34_48_pm.jpg

STEP 6

Remove one screw securing the CD/DVD drive.



12_21_2011_2_35_11_pm.jpg

STEP 7

Push the CD/DVD drive from the laptop and remove it.
12_21_2011_2_35_32_pm.jpg



Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) can kill your computer

ESD can permanently damage your laptop. Always ware ESD wrist strap when you work with internal computer components.

How notebook screws are marked


In Toshiba notebooks most screws are marked. Here are some examples:
F4 - flat-head screw 4mm long
B6 - button-head screw 6mm long
F16 - flat-head screw 16mm long
B8 - button-head screw 8mm long

When you are taking apart a laptop you'll have to deal with lots of screws. Keep everything organized.


Removing Memory Modules


Carefully spread latches on both sides of the memory slot with your fingers.


Carefully spread latches on both sides of the memory slot with your fingers.


Carefully pull the memory module from the slot by the edges.


Removing Wireless Card

There are two antenna wires connected to the wireless card.
White wire connects to the main connector on the card.
Black wire connects to the auxiliary connector on the card.

To disconnect the antenna wire from the wireless card grasp the connector with your fingers and unsnap it from the card.

Carefully spread latches on both sides of the wireless card slot, just enough to release the card.


The wireless card will pop up at 30 degrees angle.

Pull the wireless card from the slot by the edges.


Disconnecting Keyboard


Before you pull the keyboard cable from the connector on the motherboard, you'll have to open up the connector.

Before you pull the keyboard cable from the connector on the motherboard, you'll have to open up the connector.

After the connector is unlocked you can pull the cable. Be very careful with the connector. If you accidentally damage the connector, you'll have to replace the motherboard.

Removing Modem Card

The connector is located under the modem and you cannot see it until the modem is remove. After the modem is removed, disconnect the cable (on the left side).

\Usually the modem is secured to the motherboard by two screws. Remove them.

To disconnect the modem from the motherboard lift it up.


CPU came out attached to heatsink
In some cases, when you remove the heat sink, the CPU might get out attached to the heat sink. DO NOT install it back into the socket like that, separate the CPU from the heat sink first.


CPU came out attached to the heat sink because thermal paste dried out and glued the processor.

Insert a flathead screwdriver between the CPU and the heat sink surface. Carefully rotate the screwdriver until the CPU separates from the heat sink.

\Lift up the CPU and install it back into the socket on the motherboard. Now you can safely remove old thermal paste and apply a new layer of paste.


Removing and Installing CPU


The CPU is locked in the socket. Before you can remove the CPU, you'll have to unlock the socket. Use a flathead screwdriver and turn the socket screw to "Open" position.


Lift up the CPU by the edges. Be careful, there are a lot of fragile pins on the opposite side of the CPU. You should be able to install the CPU back into the socket without any force.

There is only one correct way to install the processor into the socket. Both CPU and socket are keyed. When you are installing the CPU, make sure to match pins on the processor with holes on the socket.

Before applying thermal grease on the CPU, clean the surface with alcohol.

After the CPU surface is cleaned, apply a small drop of thermal grease.

Spread thermal grease evenly and install the heat sink.


ATTENTION! If you forget to lock the CPU in the socket, the laptop will not boot. If you install the heat sink without applying thermal grease, the CPU will overheat.

Dec 20, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

I put a new power supply & heatsink with fan in my system & now I can't get it to power on. The heat sink was VERY hard to get on. I even put the old power supply back in & it won't power on....


If your CPU is sticked on the heat sink due to heat sink cement, could have damaged your CPU pins. Those CPUs like AMD and IBM Desktops we need to unassembled the same by tilting method. If your CPU pins are damaged, remove your CPU from heat sink by the help of a chisel type screw driver and clean both faces of heat sink and CPU. Do not scratch, use isopropyl alcohol to remove heat sink cement. Inspect any pins are dented or damaged. Align pins, if broken solder with help of a goldsmith. Reinsert the CPU in motherboard socket, apply a little portion heat sink cement in cpu face and re fix heat sink and recheck the motherboard.

Feb 12, 2011 | Biostar M7VIG-400 (M7VIG 400-COMBO4)...

1 Answer

My processor is celeron 2.8ghz. which motherbored supports for my processor.?


GA-8KNXP this is a gigabyte motherboard or any socket 478B motherboard brand. Good Luck

Nov 26, 2010 | Intel Celeron D 2.8GHz 478-pin 533MHz CPU...

2 Answers

I have optiplex gx60 desktop system running


No problem, it's the same generation so it will work just fine.

May 26, 2010 | Dell OPTIPLEX GX60 Motherboard

1 Answer

Motherboard model


mine gx60 SFF is a Micro ATX: models used were 6p791,c3207, c3582, or 7w079

May 16, 2010 | Dell OPTIPLEX GX60 Motherboard

1 Answer

Please tell me settings jumpers about this mb 227498-001-socket 478, sdram, cpu p4, thank you for help!


The truth is that I cannot give, not even an idea of how to set the jumpers. The way that the manifacturer gives orders to his employees is a well kept secret. The way that the jumpers are set is to give a very precise voltage to the CPU chip. Tha danger that everybody is worried about is that a vey small rise in the voltage, for instance going from 1.8 to 1.9 volts, may cause that much of an increase in the current through the chip that the temperature may increaseenough to destroy the chip. The voltage for the CPU chip is adjusted for a pre-set frequency and at that frequency the heat generated in the CPU chip is calculated to be dissipated through the heat sink, which may even have a blower. Increasing the frequency of a CPU than what the manufacturer intended is called "overclocking" and up until now it has the hobby of some amateurs, who experimented and actually have had good results. But look at the sequence: the voltage on the CPU is raised slowly, watching the temperature of the chip, not to exceed the point of no return. Once the heat sink is unable to maintain the safe temp., the system is dismantled and a new heat sink perhaps with a more efficient blower, will place the chip within its thermal limits. If your CPU has not burned out already ask the manufacturer of the mother board for information and get figures that will help you to increase the frequency and still, up to a point, avoid the destruction of the chip. As a point of information Compaq never has manufactured any mother boards. They specify them to their favorite supplier and he delivers the quantity they need. The same holds true with the mother company HP. Tell me if you are out of business with your computer and I can do an inquiry and there is the chance that we get some onfirmation. One alternative, not very cheap, is to buy a MB that has a provision for gaming and has adjustments and control of the heat dissipated by the CPU chip. I desire to help all I can that we can have your computer running, under the limitations said above.
We tahnk you very much for considering our service...
My name is Constantin (arzconst)

May 16, 2009 | Compaq ( 277498-001) Motherboard

1 Answer

What cpu will it except


The M9475 board came on the GX280 amongst other Dell models. This is socket LGA775

Apr 13, 2009 | Dell Computer Refurbished SYSTEM BOARD -...

1 Answer

How do you remove the heat sink from the CPU?


This depends on the CPU and the heat sink. The heat sink is fastened to the socket on the motherboard on two sides. It will be fastened to a tab on each side. In all likelyhood, the heat sink will have some sort of handle on it. AMD processors these days have a little lever that must be moved from the far right position up to the center. This loosens the heat sink and you can reach down to unhook first the side with the lever from the socket and then the back side. Intel processors seem to have a flat metal piece that must be pushed down to relieve tension on the clamp. As you do so, you have to get down by the socket on the motherboard and push the metal clamp away from the socket. This takes some doing, as it's quite tight. Once you have released the one side, the second side is loose and can be unfastened.
The heat sink can now be pulled up (use a slight twisting motion if possible to break the seal between the heat sink and the CPU. If the computer is several years old, the seal will be hard to break.

Feb 05, 2009 | Gigabyte GA-8IPE1000-G (MBGA81PE1000G)...

2 Answers

Pentium D problem


Hi oilian,
Be glad it did shut down. If it didn't, your new CPU could haveover heated. There are a few reasons for a CPU to over heat.
1.) There is no thermal grease or too little on the heat-sink assembly.
2.) The old thermal grease was not removed or the old thermal tape was not removed.
3.) The heat-sink assembly was not cleaned completely with alcohol before applying new thermal grease.
4.) The CPU fan is running too slowly.
5.) The heat-sink fins are possibly filled with dust build-up & the CPU fan can not cool the heat-sink assembly. Boot to the bios & go to Hardware Monitor. There you can check voltage, CPU fan speed, CPU temp & other bios monitored settings.

Good luck oilian!
Mike

Oct 01, 2008 | ASUS P5GC-MX/1333 - Motherboard - micro...

3 Answers

P4P800 SE vs P4P800 Mx


The general answer is yes.

1) Both of these boards have the same CPU socket:
"Intel Socket 478", so they are CPU compatible
at the pin level.

The different support chip-sets (North and South bridge)
do provide different I/O features and bus optimizations,
but this is NOT a problem to the CPU, nor an issue to
worry about.

2) Also, both these boards are smart enough
in the BIOS, to automatically detect the CPU
and to automatically set the clock speeds and
power supply voltages.

The P4P800 board is more then fast enough to take full
advantage of the 2.4 GHz CPU.

The only time you could get into trouble is if you
override the BIOS settings to over-clock or over-voltage
the CPU or memory, without knowing what you are doing.

3) If you are not sure, just let the BIOS do its thing, and auto
set the CPU and memory settings.

However ! ...

4) Be extremely careful when physically swapping the CPU's
and heat sinks:

a) Make sure the computer is physically unplugged,
and the power has been off for a few minutes.

b) Unclip the whole fan/heat-sink assembly as a unit if
you can, and wash the bottom of the heat-sink with
rubbing alcohol to remove the "white gunk"
(heat-sink transfer compound)

Similarly clean off the CPU's after you remove them from
the socket, do NOT drip alcohol onto the mother-board,
because it could dissolve, soften or contaminate it.

The alcohol will NOT hurt the metal heat-sink, nor the
ceramic top of the CPU.

c) To remove the CPU from the socket (and to replace it)
release the socket lever on the socket FIRST.

The CPU should slide in and out of the socket without
ANY force what so ever, and make sure that PIN-1
and the shamfered corner are oriented correctly !!!

If you plug in the CPU the wrong way, and power it up,
it is GAME OVER !!!

d) Take extreme care not to STATIC zap the mother board,
or the CPU. Wrap a thin bare wire around your wrist,
and connect the other end to the computer case,
before handling ANY electronic parts.

(With the computer still turned off and unplugged :)

This is EXTREMELY important, because your body
can accumulate a very small charge at a very high
voltage of several thousand volts before you even feel
a tingle, and when discharged can fry or injure every
chip on the board.

do NOT remove the mother board from the box just
to change the chip, if you can possibly avoid it.
Handling motherboards is ALWAYS risky due to
the risk of static as well as flexing the board and
braking internal "plate-through-hole" connections.

I am an expert many times over so please take my
word for it.

5) After you install the new CPU in its socket, but BEFORE
you re-attach the heat-sink, you need to apply a liberal
amount of NEW white heat-sink compound between the
heat sink and the CPU.

This white goo is a silicon based grease that drastically
improves the heat transfer from CPU to heat sink, i.e.
lowers the thermal resistance in degrees per Watt,
to keep the CPU from overheating.

Many people skip this important step, but if your CPU
overheats, it won;t last long.

The heat-sink compound is available from any electronic
or computer shop.

6) Make sure that you clean and reconnect the CPU fan,
and check that it is working properly.

7) Make sure that your power supply is strong enough to
provide the additional current required by a faster CPU.

Keep in mind, that the amount of power consumed, and
heat generated by the CPU is directly proportional to
frequency and to the square of the operating voltage.

Also, faster CPU's never last as long as slower ones,
due to increased nano-scale current densities and
atomic scale erosion due to these currents. Although
the currents are miniscule from our point of view, so are
the circuit geometries, and if you do the math, (I have)
the effect of sending some of these internal currents
through the nanometer-sized conductors is like forcing
the Mississippi river through a half inch pipe.

The sheer momentum of the electrons is sufficient to
knock whole atoms out place and slowly erode the
tiny semiconductor structures.

All chips WILL fail in time. The faster they run the sooner
they fail, but hopefully "after" they become obsolete.

8) So make sure you have enough fans to keep things cool.

9) Finally it is good to identify your speed bottle necks,
before you start changing things, for example:

If the RAM is marginal, it will not run reliably at the
increased bus speeds. The mother board (BIOS)
compensates for this when calculating the timing
settings, and increases the number of bus-cycle wait
states. The net result is that your faster CPU can result,
in a slower computer under some conditions.

Another thing people tend to ignore is the amount of RAM.
RAM is 10,000,000x faster then hard disk.

When a computer (Windows) starts running out of RAM,
it begins to swap less used data to hard disk, in a process
called virtual memory paging. If it pages too much, it is
called thrashing. A thrashing computer can take hours or
even days to perform a task that should only take a few
seconds.

Increasing the speed of the CPU by 20% often doubles the
cost. The same amount of money is put to better use
increasing the amount (and quality) of RAM, with much
more impressive results.

For a Pentium-4 based XP machine I recommend 2 Gigs
of RAM, only because 32-bit Windows can only access
4-Gigs, 2 of which are reserved for the OS and remapping
the video card. This leaves 2 Gigs for user app's.

IT is possible to configure windows to use a little more, by
setting the /3GB or the /uservalu= switch within the boot.ini
file but this can lead to unforeseen complications.

The problem with 64-bit windows is that it still has limited,
driver support and you need a 64-bit motherboart/CPU
such as a core-2-duo.


Good luck, please rate my answers.

Martin






Jul 15, 2008 | ASUS P4P800-VM MB, 865G/ 800FSB/ SATA/...

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