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Model JKP13G0P4BG. Bake temperature is way too

Model JKP13G0P4BG. Bake temperature is way too below to the set up temperature. I replaced thermostat but still not work

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: Amana Convection oven not controlling temp

I have just checked the baking guide in the manual and have found that it may not be us after all. (Maybe this is why they telll us to read the whole manual. Well, I never have) According to the cooking time for Baking, the range is very extensive. For example, an angel cake at 350 could take from 28-50 minutes, buscuits at 375-400 could take 8-16 minutes, layer cakes at 350-375 could take 25-40 minutes, pound cakes at 325-350 could take 45-70 minutes and fresh pies at 400-450 could take 35-60 minutes. Basically, the baking directions on the box means absolutely nothing to use Amana oven owners. We have no choice but to cook our food or baked goods until they are cooked, whenever that may be. :) Linda

Posted on Dec 30, 2007

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SOURCE: my f&p wall oven model number BI602 is not reaching temperature

Most likely you have a faulty fan element- this is a round element that goes around the fan at the back. To check- Disconnect from power(easiest way is to switch off oven at fuse board). Remove rear panel inside oven (held on by screws), and visually check element- often you will see a blow mark on the element. Element is easily changed, although sometimes requires oven to be removed to access element wires from the back. Proceed if you are a confident DIYer, otherwise call a local service agent. Elements are readily available for $75-$125 depending on the retailer.

Posted on Mar 09, 2010

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2 Answers

Whirlpool Oven will not heat


Hello there:Usually,
when an oven won't bake, it's because the bake element is burned out. The bake element is the black, pencil- thick tube at the bottom of the oven. When the oven heats, the element glows red. This element has an expected life-span of several years. It may last for only one; it may last for many more. When the element burns out, you need to replace it.

If the bake element is burned out, replacing it should solve the problem. Otherwise, you need to further troubleshoot the oven's electrical system to locate the defective wire or component. When the temperature is consistent but too high or too low, it could be one of several different things. First check to see if the thermostat sensing bulb has come loose from its holder. It could be lying on the floor of the oven or resting on the heating element. This would cause the oven to not heat correctly. bullet.jpg If the thermostat bulb is not dislodged, it's likely that the thermostat or sensor is either mis-calibrated or defective. bullet.jpg Electronic ovens with a digital display use a sensor to monitor oven temperature. To solve temperature problems for these models, you may need to replace the sensor. On some digital-display models, you can calibrate the temperature using the key pad. See your operator's manual for details. bullet.jpg Ovens without a digital display often use a mechanical system for controlling temperature. On many of these units, you can remove the thermostat knob and adjust the knob itself to more accurately represent the actual setting of the thermostat. bullet.jpg If, when you remove the knob, there's a screw on the back of it with a small calibration plate, you can loosen the screw, adjust the plate, then tighten the screw again. If the knob isn't adjustable, and the oven temperature is off by more than 30 to 40 degrees, you need to replace the thermostat to solve the problem.

Jul 22, 2010 | Whirlpool RBS275PD Electric Single Oven

1 Answer

Built in oven won't get hot


hello there
Usually, when an oven won't heat up or bake, it's because the bake element is burned out. The bake element is the black, pencil- thick tube at the bottom of the oven. When the oven heats, the element glows red. This element has an expected life-span of several years. It may last for only one; it may last for many more. When the element burns out, you need to replace it. Now if the oven It bakes poorly Here are two instances of when food "bakes poorly:" When the food you're baking is done on top but not on the bottom--or when baking just takes far too long to finish--the bake element may be burned out. You may get fooled into thinking it's working, because the oven is hot inside. But many electric ovens use the broil element, too, during the preheat and bake cycles. So the food may be getting heated only by the broil element, which causes poor baking results. If the bake element is burned out, replacing it should solve the problem. Otherwise, you need to further troubleshoot the oven's electrical system to locate the defective wire or component. When the temperature is consistent but too high or too low, it could be one of several different things. First check to see if the thermostat sensing bulb has come loose from its holder. It could be lying on the floor of the oven or resting on the heating element. This would cause the oven to not heat correctly. If the thermostat bulb is not dislodged, it's likely that the thermostat or sensor is either mis-calibrated or defective. Electronic ovens with a digital display use a sensor to monitor oven temperature. To solve temperature problems for these models, you may need to replace the sensor. On some digital-display models, you can calibrate the temperature using the key pad. See your operator's manual for details. Ovens without a digital display often use a mechanical system for controlling temperature. On many of these units, you can remove the thermostat knob and adjust the knob itself to more accurately represent the actual setting of the thermostat. If, when you remove the knob, there's a screw on the back of it with a small calibration plate, you can loosen the screw, adjust the plate, then tighten the screw again. If the knob isn't adjustable, and the oven temperature is off by more than 30 to 40 degrees, you need to replace the thermostat to solve the problem
Hope thisis very helpful for you
Best regards Michael .

Mar 08, 2010 | Ovens

1 Answer

The broiler works but the bake side wont heat up but does warm


Hi There
I have found some stuff for you to read and hope this will help. Let me know how it goes.
It won't bake Usually, when an oven won't bake, it's because the bake element is burned out. The bake element is the black, pencil- thick tube at the bottom of the oven. When the oven heats, the element glows red. This element has an expected life-span of several years. It may last for only one; it may last for many more. When the element burns out, you need to replace it. It bakes poorly Here are two instances of when food "bakes poorly:" When the food you're baking is done on top but not on the bottom--or when baking just takes far too long to finish--the bake element may be burned out. You may get fooled into thinking it's working, because the oven is hot inside. But many electric ovens use the broil element, too, during the preheat and bake cycles. So the food may be getting heated only by the broil element, which causes poor baking results. If the bake element is burned out, replacing it should solve the problem. Otherwise, you need to further troubleshoot the oven's electrical system to locate the defective wire or component. When the temperature is consistent but too high or too low, it could be one of several different things. First check to see if the thermostat sensing bulb has come loose from its holder. It could be lying on the floor of the oven or resting on the heating element. This would cause the oven to not heat correctly. If the thermostat bulb is not dislodged, it's likely that the thermostat or sensor is either mis-calibrated or defective. Electronic ovens with a digital display use a sensor to monitor oven temperature. To solve temperature problems for these models, you may need to replace the sensor. On some digital-display models, you can calibrate the temperature using the key pad. See your operator's manual for details. Ovens without a digital display often use a mechanical system for controlling temperature. On many of these units, you can remove the thermostat knob and adjust the knob itself to more accurately represent the actual setting of the thermostat. If, when you remove the knob, there's a screw on the back of it with a small calibration plate, you can loosen the screw, adjust the plate, then tighten the screw again. If the knob isn't adjustable, and the oven temperature is off by more than 30 to 40 degrees, you need to replace the thermostat to solve the problem.
Best Regards Richard

Dec 30, 2009 | Ovens

1 Answer

Whrilpool GR450LXHB2- The stovetop works, but the


It won't bake or broilIf neither the bake nor the broiler heating elements heat, but the range burners still work, the clock may be set for a timed or self-cleaning cycle. Check to be sure the clock buttons and knobs are set properly. If your clock has a knob that says "push for man(ual)", push the knob in and try the baking and broiling elements again. If it still does not operate properly, you probably have a defect in the thermostat, selector switch, or common wiring.

If the oven does not have a separate bake/broil/etc. selector switch, the problem may be with the thermostat. But it's not easy to check the selector switch or thermostat for proper operation. If you suspect a problem in this area, call a qualified appliance repair technician.
  • When the food you're baking is done on top but not on the bottom--or when baking just takes far too long to finish--the bake element may be burned out.


  • You may get fooled into thinking it's working, because the oven is hot inside. But many electric ovens use the broil element, too, during the preheat and bake cycles. So the food may be getting heated only by the broil element, which causes poor baking results.

    If the bake element is burned out, replacing it should solve the problem. Otherwise, you need to further troubleshoot the oven's electrical system to locate the defective wire or component.

  • When the temperature is consistent but too high or too low, it could be one of several different things. First check to see if the thermostat sensing bulb has come loose from its holder. It could be lying on the floor of the oven or resting on the heating element. This would cause the oven to not heat correctly.


  • If the thermostat bulb is not dislodged, it's likely that the thermostat or sensor is either mis-calibrated or defective.

    Electronic ovens with a digital display use a sensor to monitor oven temperature. To solve temperature problems for these models, you may need to replace the sensor. On some digital-display models, you can calibrate the temperature using the key pad. See your operator's manual for details.

    Ovens without a digital display often use a mechanical system for controlling temperature. On many of these units, you can remove the thermostat knob and adjust the knob itself to more accurately represent the actual setting of the thermostat.

    If, when you remove the knob, there's a screw on the back of it with a small calibration plate, you can loosen the screw, adjust the plate, then tighten the screw again. If the knob isn't adjustable, and the oven temperature is off by more than 30 to 40 degrees, you need to replace the thermostat to solve the problem.

It won't broil Usually, when an oven won't broil, it's because the broiler element is burned out. The broiler element in an electric oven is the black, pencil-thick tube at the top of the oven. When the broiler is on, the element glows red. This element has an expected life-span of several years. It may last for only one; it may last for many more. When the element burns out, you need to replace it.

Aug 25, 2009 | Ovens

1 Answer

Gas self cleaning 30 range. In bake mode does not heat as hot as before, takes longer to bake items.


  • When the item takes far too long to finish, you probably have a weak bake igniter. Often, you need to replace the igniter, but you may want to troubleshoot the oven's electrical system further to more precisely locate the defect.

  • When the temperature is consistent but too high or too low, the oven thermostat or sensor is either mis-calibrated or defective. If your oven uses an electronic temperature-regulating device, you may have an electric sensor in the oven instead of a mechanical thermostat. If the oven temperature is off by 30 to 40 degrees in this type of unit, you must replace the sensor.

    On many units with a mechanical thermostat, you can remove the thermostat knob and adjust the knob itself to more accurately represent the actual setting of the thermostat. If, when you remove the knob, there's a screw on the back of it with a small calibration plate, you can loosen the screw, adjust the plate, then tighten the screw again. If the knob isn't adjustable, and the oven temperature is off by more than 30 to 40 degrees, you need to replace the thermostat to solve the problem.
  • Aug 14, 2009 | Ovens

    1 Answer

    The Oven is set to 450 does not get above 280


  • When the food you're baking is done on top but not on the bottom--or when baking just takes far too long to finish--the bake element may be burned out.

    You may get fooled into thinking it's working, because the oven is hot inside. But many electric ovens use the broil element, too, during the preheat and bake cycles. So the food may be getting heated only by the broil element, which causes poor baking results.

    If the bake element is burned out, replacing it should solve the problem. Otherwise, you need to further troubleshoot the oven's electrical system to locate the defective wire or component.

  • When the temperature is consistent but too high or too low, it could be one of several different things. First check to see if the thermostat sensing bulb has come loose from its holder. It could be lying on the floor of the oven or resting on the heating element. This would cause the oven to not heat correctly.

    If the thermostat bulb is not dislodged, it's likely that the thermostat or sensor is either mis-calibrated or defective.

    Electronic ovens with a digital display use a sensor to monitor oven temperature. To solve temperature problems for these models, you may need to replace the sensor. On some digital-display models, you can calibrate the temperature using the key pad. See your operator's manual for details.

    Ovens without a digital display often use a mechanical system for controlling temperature. On many of these units, you can remove the thermostat knob and adjust the knob itself to more accurately represent the actual setting of the thermostat.

    If, when you remove the knob, there's a screw on the back of it with a small calibration plate, you can loosen the screw, adjust the plate, then tighten the screw again. If the knob isn't adjustable, and the oven temperature is off by more than 30 to 40 degrees, you need to replace the thermostat to solve the problem.
  • Aug 14, 2009 | GE Profile JT912 Electric Single Oven

    1 Answer

    Oven 150 degrees off


    hi . i can help.

  • When the food you're baking is done on top but not on the bottom--or when baking just takes far too long to finish--the bake element may be burned out.

    You may get fooled into thinking it's working, because the oven is hot inside. But many electric ovens use the broil element, too, during the preheat and bake cycles. So the food may be getting heated only by the broil element, which causes poor baking results.

    If the bake element is burned out, replacing it should solve the problem. Otherwise, you need to further troubleshoot the oven's electrical system to locate the defective wire or component.

  • When the temperature is consistent but too high or too low, it could be one of several different things. First check to see if the thermostat sensing bulb has come loose from its holder. It could be lying on the floor of the oven or resting on the heating element. This would cause the oven to not heat correctly.

    If the thermostat bulb is not dislodged, it's likely that the thermostat or sensor is either mis-calibrated or defective.

    Electronic ovens with a digital display use a sensor to monitor oven temperature. To solve temperature problems for these models, you may need to replace the sensor. On some digital-display models, you can calibrate the temperature using the key pad. See your operator's manual for details.

    Ovens without a digital display often use a mechanical system for controlling temperature. On many of these units, you can remove the thermostat knob and adjust the knob itself to more accurately represent the actual setting of the thermostat.

    If, when you remove the knob, there's a screw on the back of it with a small calibration plate, you can loosen the screw, adjust the plate, then tighten the screw again. If the knob isn't adjustable, and the oven temperature is off by more than 30 to 40 degrees, you need to replace the thermostat to solve the problem.
  • Jun 23, 2009 | Ovens

    1 Answer

    Oven will not heat.


    Usually, when an oven won't bake, it's because the bake element is burned out. The bake element is the black, pencil- thick tube at the bottom of the oven. When the oven heats, the element glows red. This element has an expected life-span of several years. It may last for only one; it may last for many more. When the element burns out, you need to replace it.

    It bakes poorly Here are two instances of when food "bakes poorly:"

    • When the food you're baking is done on top but not on the bottom--or when baking just takes far too long to finish--the bake element may be burned out.

      You may get fooled into thinking it's working, because the oven is hot inside. But many electric ovens use the broil element, too, during the preheat and bake cycles. So the food may be getting heated only by the broil element, which causes poor baking results.

      If the bake element is burned out, replacing it should solve the problem. Otherwise, you need to further troubleshoot the oven's electrical system to locate the defective wire or component.

    • When the temperature is consistent but too high or too low, it could be one of several different things. First check to see if the thermostat sensing bulb has come loose from its holder. It could be lying on the floor of the oven or resting on the heating element. This would cause the oven to not heat correctly.

      If the thermostat bulb is not dislodged, it's likely that the thermostat or sensor is either mis-calibrated or defective.

      Electronic ovens with a digital display use a sensor to monitor oven temperature. To solve temperature problems for these models, you may need to replace the sensor. On some digital-display models, you can calibrate the temperature using the key pad. See your operator's manual for details.

      Ovens without a digital display often use a mechanical system for controlling temperature. On many of these units, you can remove the thermostat knob and adjust the knob itself to more accurately represent the actual setting of the thermostat.

      If, when you remove the knob, there's a screw on the back of it with a small calibration plate, you can loosen the screw, adjust the plate, then tighten the screw again. If the knob isn't adjustable, and the oven temperature is off by more than 30 to 40 degrees, you need to replace the thermostat to solve the problem.

    Jun 01, 2009 | Kenmore 40494 / 40495 / 40499 Electric...

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