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Dear Sirs, My wife has a Janome 3/4 electronic controlled differential feed 4 thread overlocker which needs a new foot plate . This is where the neddles actually pass through thr material on the surface of the machine. It has a fixed neddle as part of its makeup which I am not sure what it does. This plate is the standard one that is nornally in use for general use of the machine. The neddle is pressed into this plate and is not movable. I think she had an accident while using the machine and this neddle was broken, hence the need for a new plate. I would be grateful for any information you can provide including the cost to replace this plate if they are available. Other than that, the machine is in good working order, I await your reply Yours Sincerely John Laccohee-Joslin 8 Bond Street Donnybrook W.A. 6239 Australia

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

fixitruss
  • 6 Answers

SOURCE: Janome 134D Overlocker

Set you differential at 1.0 and your loopers at about 3-4 the needle thread tensions are usually around 5 to 6.
 I would also suggest that you place four different color threads on machine to make it easier to adjust all. Now if you are using only 3 threads the same applies.
 Also------patience.

Posted on Oct 10, 2007

  • 37 Answers

SOURCE: need manual brother B755 MKII how to insert bobine and neddle

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Posted on Jun 05, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: neddle hitting the bobbon

Make sure that the hook piece at the top of the bobbin holder fits into the slot at the top (12:00) as this aligns the needle slot.

Posted on Jun 21, 2009

  • 47 Answers

SOURCE: i need an instuction manual for overlocker model 634D

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Posted on Jul 24, 2009

  • 16 Answers

SOURCE: neddle problem

Sounds like the needle is hitting the bobbin casing. Take it out and re-seat it. Check your manual.

Posted on Aug 11, 2009

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Janome 8200DG overlocker feeds materials and cuts but not sewing Why@


Could be because it is not threaded correctly. Remove all the threads from the machine, and then step-by-step follow the instructions in the manual. It may help to install new needles. ALWAYS RAISE the presser foot when threading. Be sure to thread each thread IN THE CORRECT ORDER or your machine will never run properly.

It also helps to use separate thread colors so you can determine which thread is doing what and which one is not working properly.

May 29, 2017 | Janome Sewing Machines

1 Answer

I have a Finesse new home 23 4 overlocker. How do I start the threading please.


A manual would be helpful:

Instruction Manual Janome Newhome 234

Even if you are unable to find a manual for your particular model, similar models usually thread the same or similarly. Just be sure to ALWAYS RAISE the presser foot when threading the machine so the thread will seat in the tension disks.

New Home Sewing Machine Manuals PDF and CD

Janome New Home sewing machine instruction manuals

Make It Handmade Threading Your Serger or Overlocker

Nov 25, 2016 | New Home Sewing Machines

3 Answers

Juki MO-634DE Stiching


I tried to find this on the Juki website but its obviously a previous model so not much info on there. But did find it listed elsewhere as a 3/4 thread overlocker.

So I'd guess at the following, it probably seams a four thread marrow (overlock seam) made with two needles and two loopers. And a three thread overlock seam where you use either the left or right needle, this would give you either a narrow or wider 3 thread seam. Image below of 3 and 4 thread overlock seams.
1_10_2012_11_24_03_pm.jpg

Lastly, I would suggest that the D denotes Differential feed, this is a feature that controls the two feed dogs in the machine and gives you the ability to set them to move at different speeds - very handy to control the fabric feeding but also used decoratively for lettuce edging.

Rolled hem - most overlockers of 3/4 variety will also do a rolled hem; however, I can't actually confirm if this model does or not. But look around for a retractable stitch ****** in the foot or needle plate or a second needle plate in the accessory case. Rolled hemming is also very useful and most models will do it now; just variation in how you actually set it up to do so. Bernettes you flick a lever in front of the needle/foot area, earlier Elnas like the L3 and L4 you needed to change the needle plate and a little ****** in the presser foot.

Of course, you could email the local distributor for Juki in your country and ask them and this may be the best way to check. Just copy this into your browser
http://www.juki.co.jp/juki_form/home_e/toiawase_form.html to go to their contact us page.

Jan 10, 2012 | Juki Sewing Machines

1 Answer

How do I thread a janome 204d serger


Serger may have a threading diagram inside the front looper cover which should show the various thread eyelets that you need to pull the threads through and they may be numbered one to 4 also to indicate order of threading. The diagram is usually colour coded to match the tension dial colours and serger usually has colour dots on the different thread eyes to help you follow the thread path for each thread.

This video is great and hopefully will help you http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zszJYQe2aws&feature=related, it has lay in tensions while yours has dials so just pull the thread around the dial right to left and then across to the next thread eye and this should pull the thread into tension. Dials are usually all set to 5 for normal stitch formation.

On my serger you thread up in the following order: top looper (second from right dial), bottom looper (right hand dial), then right needle, left needle; this video shows all threading going from right to left however, so if you have a numbered diagram inside your thread cover, then certainly use that order. But always loopers before needles.

Raise the thread aerial first before you start, put the cones onto the thread spools and if you have any cone holders (little plastic triangles) put them on the spools first to steady the cones. Now for each thread, take the thread tail from the cone, up through the aerial thread guide, then follow the coloured dots and take this down the front of the serger putting it into each coloured thread guide, through looper then up under the raised pressure foot. Repeat for next looper, then the needles.

Pull all 4 threads out under the foot to the left, lower foot, then chain off a little to start and test sew on fabric, adjusting the tensions if you need to.

Other adjustments are stitch length (usually a knob on right beside the flywheel numbered 1-4, blade position, a dial either left or right of the blade, press on the blade to release the tension on it before you try and move it. And differential feed, this is also a knob numbered 0.5 to 2 usually. If you can't see this on the right by flywheel then open up fabric plate (left cover) and look in there for these two adjustments.

I would suggest you start with tensions on 5, and stitch length of 2-3, and test sew on scraps of the fabric you wish to overlock. You can then either move the blade to cut wider or narrower to suit and adjust the two looper tensions if you need to close up the thread on the cut edge. There is no black and white settings as each fabric will behave a little differently, generally you adjust the looper tensions a bit until the stitch is encasing the cut edge and you have a seam width that suits the weight of the fabric.

Differential feed leave on zero unless you find you need it when a loose weave fabric goes wavy, then turn it down to close up the feeding. Sergers have two feed dogs, one before and after the foot and turning differential knob changes the ratio of feed between the two so either stretches the fabric, or pushes it together as it goes through the stitching sequence. So by turning differential feed up to 1.5 or 2 you are stretching the fabric and you can do a narrow rolled hem edge that is all fluted (lettuce edging).

I hope this helps you out a bit, if you are completely new to this machine and have never used a serger then I always suggest taking a class from a local dealer, it is really worth the money and time as they are quite different to sewing machines but once mastered, really change the dynamics of sewing and techniques are much more like commerical production with flat construction etc.

May 22, 2011 | Janome MyLock 204D Mechanical Sewing...

1 Answer

Hi. About 5 years ago I purchased a Janome 744D Overlocker which I have only used once because the thread on the underside keeps snapping, and the needles keep breaking off. The foot is also very touchy...


Yes, overlockers sew fast, usually 1500 stitches per minute and with a blade in action alongside the loopers so there is a lot happening. Keep all pins well away from the seam edge, contrary to normal sewing machine techniques, if you pin two layers together, then place the pins parallel to the fabric cut edge at least 2 inches away from the edge so the pin goes nowhere near the foot or blade.

Check whenever you use it, that you firstly extend the thread aerial up to full height, you need to ensure the threads can flow smoothly to the tension dials as the thread will stream off fast, even the slightest catch of a thread will snap one, throw your tension out or damage a looper.

As you've had it all this time and not used it, why not consider investing a few dollars more and go to a class on overlockers, and learn how to thread it up for three, four, rolled hem and using the differential feed. If there is no class options in your area, then try the Janome dealer near you and see if they would consider giving you a a little lesson on using it. You could also check out the videos on You-tube or read some pages from Debbie on www.sewing.about.com, she has several pages on sergers (USA name for overlockers), explains the needles, threading, different techniques and maintenance. Or check out your local library for any books on sergers/overlockers, there are several good "how to" guides out there that would certainly help you get started.

Unfortunately there is no way to slow the speed to half speed, just practice with lots of fabric scraps at first, to get used to the sensitivity of the foot control. If you do dressmaking but aren't sure where to overlock or which seams you could only overlock, then consider just doing a three thread overlock around the edge of each fabric piece before you commence assembling the garment, just do your notch markings another way such as chalking them or using water soluable marker pen as the blade will cut away your outwards notches.

My other suggestion would be to make a simple sweat shirt on it using the 4 thread stitch and not touching your sewing machine at all. Once you've made one, you'll soon be wizzing them up in 30 mins, so quick to sew knits on an overlocker. Some of the commercial patterns are marked as suitable for sergers, look for one of these to try.

I hope this helps you to master your overlocker, a lesson or class would help you with the steep learning curve at first.

May 22, 2011 | Janome Sewing Machines

2 Answers

I've just got janome 634d serger, how can i make the bottom of a T-shirt ? Thank you so much


If you want the bottom of the T to look like RTW with the double row of stitching, you cannot do this on a serger.

You can achieve the effect by using a twin needle, two spools of thread, bobbin and a straight stitch.

Make sure the double/twin needle will pass through the presser foot and opening in the needle plate below the presser foot.

Practice on a double layer of a scrap of the T shirt material as the tension may need to be slightly looser than the normal setting.

Apr 05, 2010 | Janome MyLock 634D Mechanical Sewing...

1 Answer

I would like step by step instructions how to gather a ruffle on my machine. Thanks so Much!!


I don't know if this will help. Overedge and gather, select overlock 4, increase stitch lenght to 4.Lift foot and dial differential feed to 2.2. Increase the 2 needles to 4.6

Jan 30, 2010 | Janome MyLock 644D

1 Answer

The needles on my Janome 9102D keep breaking


I had a similar problem with my machine. What I've started doing with mine is setting the stitch length at 3 and the differential feed ratio at 1.0 then I set all 4 thread tensions at 3. I thread the machine from right to left, and then when everything seems to be working okay I take scrap material to test the tension and then set them to suit the material I'm using. Right now I'm working with a twill so my settings are 4-4-5-5. This seems to have stopped the thread slipping off the bottom looper and I haven't had any more needles break. I hope this is helpful.

Dec 02, 2008 | Janome Harmony 9102D Mechanical Sewing...

1 Answer

Stitches don't feed properly


Remove the foot and the needle plate. Check the area where the stitches are formed to see if there are any rough edges on the plate or stitch finger. Sometimes you will find a crack in the plate that is hidden under the foot. While the foot is up, the gap closes but when it is lowered and fabric is trying to feed the crack opens and the rough edge won't allow it to advance.

Jul 13, 2008 | Husqvarna Huskylock Computerized 910

1 Answer

Janome 134D Overlocker


Set you differential at 1.0 and your loopers at about 3-4 the needle thread tensions are usually around 5 to 6.
 I would also suggest that you place four different color threads on machine to make it easier to adjust all. Now if you are using only 3 threads the same applies.
 Also------patience.

Oct 09, 2007 | Janome MyLock 634D Mechanical Sewing...

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