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My system often does not boot why - Mercury P4VM800M7 Motherboard

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Your hard drive is failing, you will need to replace your hard drive

Posted on May 30, 2010

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Dual Boot


You may have overwritten your boot.ini file.

  • Click Start, click Control Panel, and then double-click System.
  • On the Advanced tab, under Startup and Recovery, click Settings.
  • Under System startup, in the Default operating system list, click the operating system that you want to start when you turn on or restart your computer.
  • Select the Display list of operating systems for check box, and then type the number of seconds for which you want the list displayed before the default operating system starts automatically.

    To manually edit the boot options file, click Edit. Microsoft strongly recommends that you do not modify the boot options file (Boot.ini), because doing so may render your computer unusable.

If both OS's are the same, you should be able to copy and paste the line for XP and simply change the drive letter to the location of the second OS.

Jul 10, 2012 | Computers & Internet

Tip

Boot problems and their possible causes & resolutions


Symptoms:
Black screen
"Invalid Partition Table"
"Error loading operating system"
"Missing operating system"


Cause:
Corrupt Master Boot Record (MBR)

Resolution:
Boot into Recovery Console and run "fixmbr" to repair the MBR

--

Symptoms:
"A disk read error occurred"
"NTLDR is missing"
"NTLDR is compressed"


Cause:
Corrupt boot sector

Resolution:
Boot into Recovery Console and run "fixboot" to repair the boot sector

--

Symptoms:
"BOOT.INI is missing or corrupt"
"Boot device inaccessible"
"Windows could not start because the following file is missing or corrupt:
<Windows root>\system32\hal.dll"


Cause:
BOOT.INI missing, corrupt or out of date as a partition has been inserted

Resolution:
Boot into Recovery Console and run "bootcfg /rebuild" to repair the BOOT.INI

--

Symptoms:
"Windows could not start not start because the following file is missing or corrupt:
\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\CONFIG\SYSTEM"


Cause:
Corrupt/missing system hive

Resolution:
1. Boot into Recovery Console and run "chkdsk C: /f" to check the system disk for errors and fix them, then reboot.
2. If the error continues and System Restore is enabled, copy the system hive from the last restore point into \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\CONFIG
3. If the error continues, copy the system hive from \WINDOWS\REPAIR into \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\CONFIG
4. If the error continues, perform a repair installation by booting from the Windows installation media


--

Symptoms:
"Windows could not start because of a computer disk hardware configuration problem.
Could not read from the selected boot disk, Check boot path and disk hardware."


Cause:
Boot volume (with Windows folder) is not accessible as defined in BOOT.INI

Resolution:
Check the boot volume is accessible

--

Symptoms:
Dual-boot 32-bit Windows and 64-bit Windows system reports "NTOSKRNL.EXE is corrupt" trying to boot into 64-bit Windows

Cause:
System volume contains an older boot loader than the boot volume requires - e.g. XP SP2 installed after XP x64

Resolution:
Copy NTDETECT.COM and NTLDR from XP x64 installation media to the root of the system volume

on May 03, 2010 | Computers & Internet

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How to remove Multiboot Option in Windows


If under various circumstances you had to install a second Windows OS on the same system, you should have already met the dual boot option. It will pop up before booting the system permitting the user to select which OS will boot.

Boot.ini, the house of the dual boot option Boot.ini is a system file found in the system root. Because it has a major importance for the booting process.so we have to edit this boot.ini file to remove multiboot popups.

How to edit Boot.ini

1.Go to Start Click on Run
2.Type msconfig.

Once the system configuration window pops up, you will notice that Boot.ini has its own tab. Select that tab and where you see "timeout," set it to a lower or higher value. Remove/Add Operating Systems in the dual boot menuThis is the main issue.

Step 1:Right click on My Computer icon and select Properties.

Step 2:From the properties window go to Advanced > Startup and Recovery > Settings.

Here, you can both edit the timeout value and modify the Boot.ini file by clicking Edit. If you remove the second operating system from Boot.ini, the dual boot option won't appear before booting.

For more details information visit How to Remove Multiboot Option in Windows XP

on Jan 08, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Winfast boot sequence problem


Boot sequence problem? You set the boot sequence permanently in the Bios or System Setup. Normally when you boot the system the screen will tell you what key to hit to get into the Bios or Systems Setup.

You can set the boot sequence temporarily (just for the current boot cycle) by watching the screen when you boot and it will tell you which key to hit to change the boot sequence or boot order.

May 07, 2012 | ASUS Computers & Internet

2 Answers

Lap top will not boot need to know how to set the boot options in the bios


If you are interested in doing it more easily and quickly. I think you can try this computer boot up suite. When your computer crashes, cannot enter Windows, or you want to work under boot environment, this is your NO. 1 choice.

Jun 06, 2011 | ASUS Computers & Internet

1 Answer

How to format my computer?


To format your computer, you must have the (OS) Operating system CD. You have to move your important file to another location because formating your system will wipe out all the files you have on that drive. Put the OS CD on your CD-ROM and restart your your system. When system boots it will boot to the CD-ROM if the boot order is set that way. Otherwise you need to set the first boot order to the CD-ROM from BIOS. When the system boots to the CD-ROM you will be asked to press any key to boot from the CD-ROM, do just that and the system will boot from the CD-ROM. Follow the on screen instructruction afterward.

May 25, 2010 | ASUS P5KPL-AM SE Motherboard

1 Answer

I have DG31PR Original Motherboard with the system. I have installed Two HDD in the system Now i Want to change the boot order without entering BIOS Setup. Is it possible to press some function key like F7...


I assume you're wanting to automatically boot a different hard-drive? If so, it's a real simple fix. I'll take you through the steps using Windows XP Professional. In the example below we will tell the system to automatically boot Windows 7 if the user does not make a choice in 30 seconds.

1. Open My Computer.
2. Open your C:\ drive.
3. At the top, select Tools -> Folder Options (Picture)
4. Select "Show Hidden Files and Folders," Uncheck "Hide Extensions for known File Types," Uncheck "Hide Protected Operating System Files." (Picture)
5. Locate "boot.ini." (Picture)
6. Right-Click boot.ini and go to "Properties." (Picture)
7. Uncheck "Read-only" and press OK. (Picture)
8. Open boot.ini
9. Find the line corresponding with the system you want to boot automatically every time your system starts. (Picture)
10. Place the system's path into the "Default" slot. (Picture)

NOTE: Only place the system's path into the default slot, not the boot options and description!

11. Save the file and exit boot.ini.
12. Once again, right-click boot.ini and go to Properties. (Picture)
13. Check "Read-only" and press OK. (Picture)
14. Restart your system to ensure the changes were made correctly and that your system starts the correct operating system.

CAUTION: Altering the lines below "[operating systems]" can change the way you system starts and might prevent your system from starting! DO NOT ALTER ANY ENTRIES BELOW "[operating systems]" UNLESS YOU ABSOLUTELY KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING! Altering the "Default" slot will not harm your system as long as you enter a system path that is described in the "[operating system]" sector.


Altering boot.ini the way we just did tells the system to automatically start Windows 7 if the user does not make a choice in 30 seconds. Additionally, if you want the timer to run for say 1-3 seconds, you can alter the "timeout" value to read something similar to: timeout=2
That way when the system will automatically boot the "default" system in 2 seconds if the user doesn't make a choice. NOTE: Don't forget, you can't alter boot.ini unless "Read-only" is unchecked. Also, don't forget to check it again once you're finished editing boot.ini.

Let me know if this solved your problem, or if you were wondering how to do something else.

Jan 01, 2010 | Intel Computers & Internet

1 Answer

BOOT.INI deleted. How to re-create this file?


Hi,
That's not a virus. Boot.ini is a default file needed for Windows OS to boot.
Fortunately, you can recreate the boot.ini files

This is a sample of the above Boot.ini file with a previous installation of Windows 2000 on a separate partition. [boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Windows XP Professional" /fastdetect
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(2)\WINNT="Windows 2000 Professional" /fastdetect

Simple way to add operating system on a separate partition:
At the command prompt, type: bootcfg /copy /d Operating System Description /ID# Where Operating System Description is a text description (e.g. Windows XP Home Edition), and where # specifies the boot entry ID in the operating systems section of the BOOT.INI file from which the copy has to be made.

Please rate this if you found this answer helpful. :)


Dec 28, 2008 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional

4 Answers

BOOTMGR is missing


i have a problem when my external drive is in the usb and i start my laptop it says bootmgr is missing how can i sort this problem as i have to take it out of the usb plug to get my laptop working the i plug the external drive back in and it works,

Dec 17, 2007 | Computers & Internet

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