Question about Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm Lens

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I always put the flash on Auto but every picture requiring the flash comes out overexposed, even though the flash is required for the shot. Any ideas?

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Yes ...change the environmental mode...and set it to normal..cause it may be on night vision or something like that ..or ..choose it by the need of the moment ..day light ...inside..outside..etc

Posted on May 30, 2010

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Power Shot A620 Canon 7.1 mega pixel 3 years


A stuck shutter is another common failure mode for digital cameras. The symptoms of a stuck or "sticky" shutter are very similar to CCD image sensor failure. The camera may take black pictures (for shutter stuck closed), or the pictures may be very bright and overexposed, especially when taken outdoors (for shutter stuck open).
To confirm a stuck shutter, put the camera in any mode other than "Auto", and turn the flash OFF (you don't want to blind yourself for the next step). Next look down the lens and take a picture. You should see a tiny flicker in the center of the lens as the shutter opens and closes. If no movement is seen, then you likely have a stuck shutter. If so, please see this link for further info and a simple fix that may help:

Dec 30, 2009 | Canon PowerShot A620 Digital Camera

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Can I leave my flash on permantly on.


You better put the flash on auto mode than on always on mode. When you put on auto the camera senses when it needs a flash and fires accordingly. If you leave it on, it will fire for every shot, even when it is not necessary, and it is not good for your pictures.

Dec 23, 2009 | Vivitar ViviCam 8025 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Background is overexposed


So, the problem doesn't seem to be the flash if the actual subject in the foreground is exposed properly. My guess is that the background is being lit by another light source. Typically, your camera uses a flash for dark areas or what it gauges as a dark area. This doesn't adjust the background for additional light sources. For example, if you're standing outside and there's a tree covering someone that you're taking a picture of your flash will adjust to "properly" light that individual. However, because the flash was used for the main subject, the background is actually now overexposed. The overexposed background will show up as a brightly lit area because the camera had to adjust for the foreground. This will actually reverse itself when it's dark out - meaning if the background and foreground are dark, the flash will expose the foreground, but the background will be black. Hopefully, that helps you understand lighting and exposure. Now, to fix this problem when shooting, you would need to consider several options - 1. SLR camera with aperture and f-stop settings as well as compensation controls. This will allow you to control every element of the exposure, but you still need to be aware of the lighting behind the "subject" to properly expose your shots. 2. backlighting compensation - common settings on both SLR and point and shoot cameras that makes auto lighting conversions for backlighting and other common lighting issues. Test whatever options are on your camera to see what works best for your specific problem. 3. Photoshop retouching - you may take one shot with your subject exposed properly and a second shot with the background then merge the images together. 4. using a tripod to shoot without using the flash - this may give you the closest exposure to exactly what you see when looking at your subject.

Dec 19, 2008 | Polaroid i733LP Digital Camera

1 Answer

Pictures nearly black (overexposed )


Hi! It's weird that 1/2 of your photos were too dark. You didn't mention about the flash. Eventhough it is on auto mode, at night you still need to turn on the flash manually. Normally, it is a curve arrow pointing downward, you need to point your mode selector there. What brand of camera are you using though?

May 05, 2008 | Canon PowerShot A540 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Overexposed picture


My guess is the the EV setting is on the + side and not neutral (0). Either that or Image Adjustment setting is wrong. Check EV by pressing the +/- button (right side near On/Off switch). Hold EV selector and make sure 0.0 is in the display. Let me know if that is not the problem and I'll assist you further.

I hope this helps!
Regards,
CharlieJ

[Please rate this solution, if it helps you.]

Mar 18, 2008 | Nikon Coolpix 5700 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Overexposed


try it in auto mode if it is the same condition do u feel change in color like white turning pink or purple or sort of over exposed pics as u said then i worry that ur CCD HR is going to faulty in coming days later on pics will get pink and purple and then ccd stops working completely , i hope this is not the case do let me know if i can help u

Jan 07, 2008 | Fuji FinePix S1 Pro Digital Camera

1 Answer

Blurred pictures


I had the same problem. The solution is in the manual but it is not straight forward. You have to set steady shot to auto when the shutter button is pressed half way down. The vibration warning will still show. At this point the camera is sensing low light. The to need to make sure the flash is set to always on. The flash setting for background will not turn the vibration warning off.

Dec 10, 2007 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-T100 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Auto Settings Mode


Hello jmmarsh, replacement of the flash unit is the righ solution. 50 Euro for my account. If you need more info, please advice. Arpi

Mar 05, 2007 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W70 Digital Camera

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