Question about Intel Motherboard

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DESKTOP COMPUTER TURN ON PROBLEM

NOTHING TURNS ON WHEN I PLUG THE 4 PIN CONNECTOR 12 VOLT POWER SUPPLIER TO THE MOTHEBOARD. WHEN I DISCONNECT THIS 4 PIN CONNECTOR FROM THE MOTHERBOARD THEN EVERYTHING TURNS ON EXCEPT NOTHING SHOWS UP ON MY DISPLAY MONTOR. NEED TO HAVE THE 4 PIN CONNECTOR PLUGGED IN IN ORDER FOR MY DISPLAY MONITOR TO SHOW ANYTHING. THIS IS A ABIT ib9 MOTHERBOARD WITH A 500 WATT THERMALTAKE POWER SUPPLY. CAN YOU HELP ME OUT WITH THIS PROBLEM., PLEASE

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In this case it is normally a voltage regulator near the cpu that is shorted and will need to be replaced.
Remove everything from the board, except the heat sink fan and plug in the big power connector, do not connect the 4 pin connector. Turn the power on as you were before.
Using a multimeter, check the voltages on those regulators. You should find them running in pairs normally, but make sure to check all of them and try to pick the odd one out.
Put your black lead to ground, and use some electrical tape to cover all of the red leads probe except for 2mm at the tip to help prevent shorting out anything else while you are there.

Posted on Apr 08, 2008

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Power supply diagram for ht 2000 motherboard


http://www.ebay.com/itm/ECS-HT2000-AMD-AM2-Socket-mATX-DDR2-800-Motherboad-w-NVidia-Graphics-/251260314586?pt=Motherboards&hash=item3a804823da


1) Uses one 24-pin ATX main power cable.

Motherboard installed in computer case, the motherboard connector for the 24-pin ATX main power cable; is to the Right of the Blue IDE (PATA) connector.
(Right side of motherboard)

General example. Note that color does NOT matter of connector,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24


2) Uses one 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable,

Motherboard installed in computer case, the whitish square 4-socket hole connector, to the Bottom/Left corner of the Processor socket; is the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable's motherboard connector.

General example. Note color does NOT matter of connector,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

THAT, would be considered a Power Supply diagram of the motherboard.

They are the only two power cables that plug into the motherboard.

The front of your desktop computer is the Front Panel.

The area of contact pins on the motherboard, that the Main wires from the Front Panel go to, is the Front Panel header.

Power On switch, Power On LED, (Light Emitting Diode), Harddrive activity LED, and a Reset switch IF used.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Apr 15, 2013 | ECS HP MCP61PM-HM Nettle3-GL8E 6150SE AM2...

1 Answer

What is the sqare chuck , wires two black and two white wires on the motherboard ?


Boy, ya got me.

If it was a small square opaque white socket on the motherboard, that a power cable from the Power Supply; had two YELLOW wires, and two Black wires, and plugged into it, I would know what it is,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

As technology for personal computers advanced, hardware components needed more power.
The motherboard wasn't able to deliver the power needed, so the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable, was brought out.

More power was needed later.
Hardware components demanded more power, than a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable could deliver.

So the 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable was brought out,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#eps8

It CONNECTS to the motherboard. (For motherboards that use one)
NOT to be confused with the 8-pin PCI Express power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress8

This power cable plugs into a GRAPHICS CARD, not the motherboard. Note the color code of the wires.

For a PCI Express expansion slot on the motherboard, for a graphics card; the best the PCI Express slot can deliver is 75 Watts.

The 6-pin PCI Express power cable was brought out next,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress

It is plugged into the graphics card too, and can deliver up to an additional 75 Watts.
Now there is 150 Watts available for the graphics card.

Computer technology advanced, and the 6-pin PCI Express power cable, couldn't deliver the power needed.

Now comes the 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable.

The 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable by itself, can deliver up to an additional 150 Watts.

Now there is 225 Watts available for a graphics card.
75 Watts from the motherboard, 150 Watts from the 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable.

Color code of wires;
1) Orange = 3.3 Volts
2) Red = 5 Volts
3) Yellow = 12 Volts
ALL are DC Voltage

(Two flashlight batteries produce 3 Volts DC)

4) Black wires are Ground wires. Also are known as Negative wires.


This motherboard happen to have a manufacturer name, and Model Number?

Can't find it?
How about the computer manufacturer name, and model number, it came out of?

The model number for a desktop computer, is on the back of the computer, next to the Windows product key; or up on the side of the computer tower.

(The plastic front of a desktop computer is the Front Panel.
Some older computers had a Door in the Front Panel.
The door is opened, and you look inside -> Down, for the model number)

Post back in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html

Feb 08, 2013 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Widetech the max psu update, now black screen on monitor


Kind of hard to give you a cable diagram, Roslyn, when you haven't stated what motherboard manufacturer and model number.

Or computer manufacturer and model number.
(Back of computer next to Windows product key; or up on side of computer tower )

So we'll wing it..............

Widetech the Max. A modular line of Power Supplies.

1) Main power cable;
It will be either a 20-pin ATX main power cable, or a 24-pin ATX main power cable.

The WTM (Widetech the Max) will have a braided thick cable, that will have a 20-pin connector, and a 4-pin connector.
Looks like this,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20plus4

The 20-pin connector, and the 4-pin connector, should have a white arrow on the side. The arrows point to each other, when the two connectors are properly aligned with each other.

So, ATX main power cable plugs into Power Supply, (If removable), and 20 + 4-pin connector plugs into motherboard.

When the hooked end of the Lock, on the side of the power cable's connector; is over the Tab on the motherboard connector; the power cable is deemed to be plugged in properly, and tightly.

Note*
Orange wires are 3.3 Volts
Red wires are 5 Volts
Yellow wires are 12 Volts.
Black wires are Ground wires. (Also are Negative)

Note that the extra 4-pin power cable, that attaches with the 20-pin ATX power cable; has TWO Yellow wires, a Red wire, and a Black wire.
This way you don't accidentally somehow, plug the following power cable, in with the 20-pin ATX main power cable,


2) 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable:

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

When Processors started using more power, than just the processor socket (Motherboard) could deliver, this power cable was brought out to help carry the load.

Note*
TWO Yellow 12 volt wires, and TWO Black ground wires.

3) 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable:

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#eps8

Brought out for motherboards supporting multiple Processors, (CPU's), such as a server computer; but with processors needing more, and more power; is used quite frequently by motherboard manufacturers now.

NOTICE the power wires. The color code of the insulation of the wires.
FOUR Yellow wires (12 Volt), and FOUR Black wires. (Ground)
NOT to be mixed up with the following power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress8

This baby plugs into a GRAPHICS CARD (Video Card. Same/same)
A PCI Express graphics card, IF it uses one.

The PCI-Express x16 slot on the motherboard, is only capable of delivering 75 Watts.
This power cable can deliver UP TO an additional 150 Watts.

It is an upgrade of this power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress

The 6-pin PCI Express power cable was brought out, to provide more power for a graphics card.

75 Watts.

So now you have the PCI-Express x16 slot on the motherboard capable of 75 Watts, and the 6-pin PCI Express power cable capable of 75 Watts; for a total of 150 Watts available for a graphics card.

PCI-Express x16 slot on motherboard, and 8-pin PCI Express power cable?

225 Watts.

This power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#eps4plus4

Is for a motherboard that uses a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable, OR an 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable.
Is a combined power cable if needed, just like the 20 + 4-pin ATX main power cable.

This power cable is a SATA power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#sata

Used to plug into a Harddrive, or Optical Drive. (CD/DVD drive)

NOTE*
IF your SATA harddrive has a provision on the back; to plug in EITHER a SATA power cable, AND a 4-pin Peripheral power cable; ONLY use the SATA power cable.

Using BOTH power cables will burn up the harddrive. May not happen immediately, but I ASSURE you it will happen.

4-pin Peripheral power cable, is also erroneously known as a 'Molex' power cable.
Molex was the first company with the CONNECTOR design. The name stuck. Kind of like calling an adjustable open-end wrench, a Crescent wrench,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

[ IDE (PATA) harddrive shown in photo. Not a SATA harddrive ]

Note that between a SATA power cable, and a SATA data cable; the SATA power cable's connector is longer.
SATA power cable connector has 15-pins.
SATA data cable's connector has 7-pins,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:SATA_ports.jpg

Note the L-shaped opening of the SATA data cable's connector; and the L-shape of the motherboard connector.
The SATA power cable has the same L-shaped opening.

NOTE that color of connectors does NOT matter.
Could be green with pink polka dots.
It is the wire color code, and connector SHAPE, that matters.

[Applies to ALL cables, and connectors}

Sometimes the SATA power cable, and SATA data cable connectors; have a lock on them.
May not see it very well. It is usually a slightly raised bump on the connector. This is depressed with a thumb nail to unlock.

Unlock WHEN installing, and removing.

ALWAYS use the connector when plugging in, or unplugging a cable.
DO NOT pull on the wires.
(Even if you have to stand on your head, and whistle 'Dixie')

I lay the computer opening side UP, on a static free towel, on a table. Much easier to get to the cabling.

ONLY plug in the cables you need, to the Power Supply.
That's what Modular cabling is all about.
Gives more room when not using unnecessary cables, and more air flow through the computer case; for cooling.

I just installed a ThermalTake TR2 600 power supply. It is Modular Cabling also.

I'm willing to bet you didn't plug the Processor (CPU) power cable in.
Either a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable, OR an 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable.

Make sure the Ram Memory is seated tightly also.
It get's bumped loose when installing a Power Supply.
No,.....you CANNOT just visually inspect, and let it go at that.

You HAVE to remove ALL ram memory modules ('Stick'), and plug them back in again; to be ASSURED that they/it are seated tightly, and correctly.

Well that about does it for me kid, post back in a Comment if you have additional questions.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Jan 01, 2013 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Msi mobo RS480m2 powers up on 20 pin connector occasionally,but wont power up on 24 pin connector at all. why?


What are the 'extra' 4 wires, Cyprian?

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20plus4

They are 2 Yellow, 1 Red, and 1 Black.

Red = 5 Volt wire
Yellow = 12 Volt wire
Black = Ground wire

You have a bad Power Supply, with a weak voltage power rail.

There are 3;
A) 3.3 Volt power rail, (Orange wires are 3.3 Volt)
B) 5 Volt power rail
C) 12 Volt power rail

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_power_supply#Wiring_diagrams

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psurailhistory/rails.html

1) If ALL of the LED lights were on at once, they would use less than 1 Watt of power.

2) EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts of power.

3) A typical Processor can use 51 to 125 Watts of power. Just depends on what Processor it is.

MicroStar Intenational RS480M2 can use processors that take a LOT of Wattage,

http://www.msi.com/product/mb/RS480M2.html#/?div=Detail

With a weak voltage power rail you do not have enough power, to turn the Processor on, and keep it on.

Picture that.

Do you wish to test the Power Supply?
Or do you have a KNOWN to be good, Compatible power supply; that you can borrow for a test unit?

Post back in a Comment.
Regards,
joecoolvette

Nov 18, 2012 | MSI Computers & Internet

1 Answer

My motherboard (intel DG41WV) is starting but not giving output to screen. I have cheked cables sokets. Even i have cheked to other screen. but problem is still. all peripherals (fan, cd-rom...etc) are...


Jumpers:
Motherboard installed in computer case;

A) Keyboard Jumper Block

3-pin jumper block, Top of motherboard/ left side. Near the mounting hole, and 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable connector,

GENERAL example of a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable, and it's respective connector on the motherboard,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

[ This power cable MUST be plugged into the motherboard.
It is power for the Intel processor ]

3-pin jumper block.
Starting at the TOP coming down;
Pins 3, 2 and 1.

Jumper cap should be on Pins 2 and 3.
(Enables the Keyboard wake-up feature. Factory default setting is Enabled. Pins 2 and 3)

B) Clear CMOS Jumper Block.

BOTTOM right corner of motherboard. 3-pin jumper block.
It is to the Left of the bottom/left SATA connector.
It is immediately to the Right of the motherboard mounting hole.

Starting at the Top, and going down towards the bottom edge of the motherboard;
Pins 3, 2, and 1.

Jumper cap should be on Pins 1 and 2.

When you changed the SMPS, do you KNOW for a fact it is a good one?
Did you plug the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable, into the motherboard?

What COMS setting/s did you change?
I would go back into BIOS Setup, and set that menu screen back to the factory default settings.

[ Load Optimal Defaults ]

BIOS Settings Glossary,

http://download.intel.com/support/motherboards/desktop/sb/biosglossary_v18.pdf

Regards,
joecoolvette

[Motherboard manual - http://www.intel.com/support/motherboards/desktop/dg41wv/sb/CS-031417.htm

Nov 11, 2012 | INTEL - MOTHERBOARDS Computers & Internet

1 Answer

New GA-990AX-UD3 motherboard will not boot


You really should take that Power Supply, and use it on grandma's computer.

The 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable was brought out, to provide more power To the motherboard AND processor.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#eps8

The 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable has TWO yellow wires.
Yellow wires are 12 Volt wires. (And two Black ground wires)

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

The 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable has FOUR 12 Volt wires.

In the motherboard manual, does it say, "Yes Tom. Go ahead and use a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable. We don't care. We just use an 8-pin EPS for fun."

[ This is an 8-pin PCI Express power cable. Completely different,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress8 ]

The motherboard probably uses 150 Watts by itself.
No Ram Memory, no CPU, no fans, etc.

The CPU could use up to 125 Watts of power. Just depends on what AMD, socket AM3, processor you are using.

Now to graphics card's power;
The most Wattage a PCI-Express x16 slot can deliver is 75 Watts.

The most power a 6-pin PCI Express power cable can deliver is 75 Watts.
8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable? 150 Watts.

When buying a Power Supply you should calculate all components needing power,

http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp

,then buy a Power Supply that has AT LEAST 10 percent more power than needed. Easier on the Power Supply.
Also a computer will NOT use more power than it needs.

10,000 Watt power supply, (Exaggeration ), and the computer only needs about 100 Watts for surfing the internet?

Computer ONLY uses 100 Watts.

Due to the price, the above, and the availability, you should use a 500 Watt power supply at least.

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=899123&CatId=1079

http://www.amazon.com/StarTech-6in-Pin-Power-Adapter/dp/B002O21XHQ

Or use it on yours if it has enough Wattage.

Back in the day, the motherboard didn't need to supply that much power to components on it.
More powerful Processors, Ram Memory, and graphics cards, brought the power needed, up.

A 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable was added for the motherboard. Then 6-pin PCI Express power cable for graphics cards. Then the 8-pin PCI Express power cable for graphics cards. Lastly the 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable.

(Better make sure the Power Supply you have is good, if you wish to use the above power adapter cable. Nothing like having a Power Supply with a weak voltage power rail, and a new build, to pull your hair out on )

http://www.gigabyte.com/products/product-page.aspx?pid=3894#ov


Out of the motherboard manual Page 23,

"With the use of the power connector, the power supply can supply enough stable power to all the components on the motherboard. Before connecting the power connector, first make sure the power supply is turned off and all devices are properly installed. The power connector possesses a foolproof design.

Connect the power supply cable to the power connector in the correct orientation. The 12V power connector mainly supplies power to the CPU. If the 12V power connector is not connected, the computer will not start.

To meet expansion requirements, it is recommended that a power supply that can withstand high power consumption be used (500W or greater). If a power supply is used that does not provide the required power, the result can lead to an unstable or unbootable system."

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Oct 25, 2012 | Gigabyte Technology GA-990FXA-UD3-...

1 Answer

M3A770DE 4 pin


Due to the 'large expanse' of information you posted I can barely contain myself.

1) 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable, that plugs into the motherboard,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

Note that this power cable has TWO Yellow 12 Volt wires.

Back in the day there was no additional power cable needed, for the motherboard.
When the Intel Pentium 4 came out, the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable came out also.

Power for the Processor.

More, and more powerful hardware components for the motherboard, (Processor and graphics card), required more power to the motherboard.

The 6-pin PCI Express power cable was brought out,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress

This power cable was used to connect directly to a graphics card, and provide power to it.

Note that this power cable has THREE Yellow 12 Volt wires.
It can carry up to 75 Watts of power.

Still wasn't enough power TO the motherboard, and TO the graphics card, with the new hardware component technology being brought out.

The 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable was brought out,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#eps8

Note that this power cable has FOUR Yellow 12 Volt wires.
Is capable of providing up to 150 Watts.

A PCI Express x16 slot is capable of providing 75 Watts.

Note the shape of the sockets in the connector.
Now compare to an 8-pin PCI Express power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress8

DO NOT confuse the 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable, with the 8-pin PCI Express power cable.
They are NOT the same.

The 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable's connector on the motherboard, is at the top left corner of the Processor socket, and close to the outside edge of the motherboard.

(With motherboard installed in computer case)

You can use the motherboard with just a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable.

Look at the LOCK on the side of the 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable's connector.

With that Lock AWAY from you, or on the opposite side of the connector, a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable plugs in on the RIGHT side.

If you have a powerful graphics card installed in your
PCI Express x16 -> slot/S, you had definitely better use a Power Supply that has an 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable.

This is a 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

Misnomered as a 'Molex' power cable.
{ Molex was the first to design and produce this style of power cable CONNECTOR. The name stuck. Kind of like calling an open-end wrench a Crescent wrench }

IF you use an adapter power cable; Use TWO 4-pin standard Peripheral power cables!!
You need those Yellow 12 Volt wires.

What will happen if you do not use two?

1) The PCI Express x16 slot/s will burn.

2) The gold plated contact pins on the PCI Express graphics card, or cards, will burn.

3) If the graphics card, or graphics cards, require a power cable connected to them;
A) The connections on the graphics card for the power cable will burn.

B) The power cable connector will burn.

Other than that the only other 4-pin references on the motherboard, that I can see, is the optical drive's 4-pin audio cable connector on the motherboard, (CD1), and the CPU (Processor) Fan 4-pin connector on the motherboard.

For additional questions, or if the above is not what you seek, post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Oct 08, 2012 | Asrock M3A770DE ATX AM3 AMD770 DDR3...

1 Answer

How do i know were to put and how manny power cables i need too insert on msi 990fax-gd65


Let's take a look at the MSI 990FXA-GD65 motherboard, and I will tell you, AND show you;

http://www.msi.com/product/mb/990FXA-GD65.html

To the right under the bold heading - AMD 990FX chipset based,
there are views of the motherboard.
I would like you to click on the second from the Left view.
(Shows a Top view of the motherboard) It is turned to the Right.

Turn the view 90 degrees to the Left, and this is how it will be sitting in your computer case.
If you move your mouse cursor around on the view, you will see a magnified view of what the mouse cursor is on.

I will do better than this in a moment, and you will download the Motherboard Manual.

A) Requires a 24-pin ATX main power cable. The connector on the motherboard has a Locking Tab.
The power cable's connector has a Lock with a hooked end.

To ENSURE the power cable is plugged in tightly to the motherboard, the hooked end of the Lock, MUST be over the tab on the motherboard connector,

Basic example of a 24-pin ATX power cable, and it's respective connector on the motherboard,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

In the photo on MSI Support, the 24-pin ATX main power cable connector on the motherboard, is on the bottom of the motherboard under the Blue, and Black ram memory slots. It is Black in color.

B) Requires an 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable. This power cable provides the 12 Volt power needed for the motherboard.
(DO NOT confuse it with an 8-pin PCI-Express power cable. More on this later)

On the motherboard JPWR2 should be printed next to it.
In the MSI Support view, it is at the top RIGHT corner of Military Class.
Black in color, 8 socket holes.

Basic example of an 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable, and it's respective connector,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#eps8

The 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable was brought out, to replace the 4-pin ATX power cable.
The Yellow wires you see are 12 Volt wires.

The 4-pin ATX power cable has TWO Yellow 12 Volt wires. (And two Black ground wires)
The 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable has FOUR Yellow 12 Volt wires.
(And four Black ground wires)

As more power was required from the motherboard, the 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable was brought out, to replace the 4-pin ATX power cable.

C) IF, you are using a graphics card, the motherboard requires a 6-pin PCI-Express power cable ALSO.

This power cable provides more power, to the motherboard's PCI-Express x16 graphics expansion slots, (2)

[ To regress for a moment, you have TWO PCI-Express x16 graphics expansion slots, and TWO PCI-Express x1 expansion slots.

The PCI-Express x16 expansion slots are used for a graphics card.
The PCI-Express x1 expansion slots are NOT. They do not require additional power, either ]

NOTE*
1) IF, your graphics card requires an additional power cable plugged into it, USE IT.
Even with a 6-pin PCI-Express power cable plugged into the motherboard.

2) IF, you do not have the additional power cable, from your Power Supply for your graphics card, AND are using a power adapter cable TO the graphics card, make SURE you use the required amount of 4-pin Peripheral power cables, to that power adapter cable.

Look at a 4-pin Peripheral power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

You will see it has ONE Yellow 12 Volt power wire. (Red is 5 Volts, Black wires are Ground wires)

Using a 4-pin Peripheral power cable TO 6-pin PCI Express power adapter cable, the 6-pin PCI Express power cable requires TWO Yellow 12 Volt wires,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress


Short solution?

A) You have to have an 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable.
B) Use a 6-pin PCI Express power cable also, if you are using a graphics card.
C) Use the power cable/s needed for the graphics card, IF it requires one.

On the first link above to the MSI Support website, hover your mouse cursor on the Downloads tab.
In the drop down list that appears, left-click on - Manual.

Drop down to the bottom file, and left-click on the blue - E7640v3.2.zip
This is a Zip file. After you click on the file name (E7640v3.2.zip), a small window will come up on the right.

Click on Save File. In the small window to the left that comes up, write down the wording at the top. This is where the zip file will download to.
Desktop, or My Documents, or Downloads.

[ If you are using a computer with Windows 7 on it, it is
Desktop, or Documents, or Downloads ]

Go to where the file is, DOUBLE-click on it. On the far left side click on
Extract all files. Then click on Next, Next, and Finish.
In the last window DOUBLE-click on the file name. (Next to the Adobe PDF icon)

For additional questions please post in a Comment.
Regards,
joecoolvette

May 25, 2012 | MSI 990FXA-GD65 - Motherboard - ATX -...

2 Answers

No power when connecting atx12V on main


did you plug in the 24 pin main of the power supply in some also take a 4 pin as well on board jim

Jul 17, 2011 | ASUS P5VDC-X Motherboard

2 Answers

Atx12v1 cable


The repeating single beep with a small pause (actually 3 Beeps a Pause) clearly indicates problems with RAM .Replace it ,your problem will be solved . As for connecting the 12 volt 4 pin connector all mobos are designed to sense the presence of this 12 volts and ONLY THEN TURN ON.

May 02, 2008 | EliteGroup ECS GeForce6100SM-M (1.0)...

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