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What hppens to the bus speed and power usage when you plug multiple devices in to a USB hub

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  • bondthecobra May 28, 2010

    yes this prt of the solution is very helpful and will be of great use

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It will slow down the BUS speed when you plug in many devices and each plugged in device will have a delay when you try to use it with your PC

Posted on May 28, 2010

  • bondthecobra May 28, 2010

    thank Micheal now how about the power usage what happens to it?

  • Anonymous May 28, 2010

    The power usage of your processor is increased when multiple accessories are plugged into the USB hub and this slows down your computer causing the mouse cursor to delay and sometimes freeze

    To help fix this problem, increase your removable RAM to the maximum allowed memory (1 GIG or better) and only use one or two of your USB ports at a time.

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Ultra SuperSpeed USB


usb speeds b> A USB, or Universal Serial Bus, is the brainchild of Intel developer Ajay Bhatt. USB is useful for transmitting data and power to devices. USB cables are widely used in 2010 to connect computers to such devices as printers, cameras and flash drives. While the USB port was initially developed for computers, it has become standard for video game consoles, smart phones, PDAs; it can also function as power cords for these devices.
Unit Load Capacity
USB comes in 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 versions. Each provides between 4.75 and 5.25 volts (V) of power that travels between one wired line. Various devices may draw this amount of power from that single, wired line. A maximum of five unit loads can be drawn from a USB 2.0 port, however six unit loads can be drawn from a USB 3.0 port, making it capable of delivering more power to devices. USB devices are configured to support a minimum of 100 milliamps (mA) times the number of powered ports it contains (200mA for one port, 300mA for two ports, etc.). b> Charging Devices b> Many devices can draw power to recharge their batteries or can function off of power currents running through a USB port cord. Superspeed USB ports run off a 3.0 platform and optimize power usage to provide the minimum amount of energy the device needs to recharge or run. New powering modes allow USB ports to supply power and communication (data transfer) concurrently. A USB Charging Downstream Port can supply up to 1.5 amps (A) at low-bandwidth transfer rates and 900mA at high bandwidth rates. A portable device such as a phone or PDA can draw up to 1.8 A from a Dedicated Charging Port on a USB 2.0 or higher device. In 2009, major cell phone manufacturers like Nokia, Motorola and Samsung agreed upon a standard, universal micro-USB charger for all their phones. In time, this will eliminate the need for manufacturers to provide charging cables with their phones. This micro-USB device has been adopted by the International Telecommunication Union as its universal mobile phone charger solution. When a device requires more power than can be delivered by a single USB port, that device may be charged with a multi-ported USB. External hard drives, for example, can be powered by a USB cable that connects to an external power supply on one end and to a device on the other. b> Powered USB b> A powered USB is a self-powered USB that uses additional power lines than standard USB ports to deliver more electrical current to a device. It uses four extra pins to supply 6 A at either 5 V, 12 V or 24 V to attached devices. Powered USBs are used to power retail devices like barcode scanners, printers, pin pads and signature capture devices. These USBs consist of two ports: a top one which accepts a USB cable and a bottom one which accepts a power cord. The powered USB allows devices to draw more power from a USB and not require an external power source to operate.
USB Power Options
b> According to Everythingusb.com, the Universal Serial Bus (USB) is a concept that was originally designed as a connection for smartphones to computers in the 1990s. Since then, the USB has evolved from the older USB 1.0 and 2.0 designs to the faster USB 3.0 model, which is also called the "Superspeed USB." A benefit of USB is that it can be used to power devices without requiring any additional power cables or plug packs.

Low-Power USB
Low-power USB devices typically consume 100 milliampere or less from the USB bus. This is called a single-load unit. USB 1.0 and 2.0 devices have a single-load unit of 100 milliampere, and for the newer USB 3.0, the single-load unit is redefined to 150 milliampere. Low-power USB devices can be plugged into any USB host or hub port. Low power bus powered devices use the so-called "V bus" pin to draw its power and run on a voltage of between 4.40 volts up to 5.25 volts. A low drop-out regulator is required for most 3.3 volt devices. b> High-Power USB b> High-power USB 2.0 devices consume between 101 milliampere and 500 milliampere (1 to 5 load units) to run on. USB 3.0 supports power consumption of up to 900 milliampere (6 load units). These devices can be plugged in to any USB port, but if you are using a USB hub, the device will only be able to draw 100 milliampere unless the hub is self-powered. High-power USB devices run on a minimum of 4.40 volts. b> Self-Powered USB b> Two types of self powered USB devices exist: true self-powered devices that rely completely on their own power supply, and hybrid self-powered devices that also draw some current from the USB bus. Hybrid self-powered USB devices typically draw up to one load unit from the bus and use their own external source for the rest of their power. Most of these devices have a safety feature to ensure that they don't try to draw more power from the bus, should the external source fail. High Speed USB Port Since 2002, Microsoft has supported high-speed USB ports in the Windows XP operating system. Prior to 2002, computers and operating systems used the USB 1.1 standard, with its 12Mbps maximum data transfer rates. USB 2.0, also known as "Hi-Speed," pushes the maximum data transfer speed to 480Mbps. To take advantage of the higher speeds, you'll need to install a USB 2.0 card in your computer. In most cases, desktop users will need to install an internal card, while laptop users with PC Card or ExpressCard slots may install external cards.
Purchase an internal USB card or internal USB drive bay. Shut down your computer. Remove all cables and peripheral devices. Remove the left side panel (when facing the front of the case). Remove any screws or adjust any latches. The method of removing your side panel will vary according to the type of case you have. If you are unsure of how to remove your side panel, see your case or computer documentation. Attach the anti-static wrist bracelet's clip to a metal object. Strap the bracelet to your wrist. Locate an empty card slot. Remove the card slot cover by unscrewing the screw and lifting the cover, if applicable. Line up the hardware with the slot to ensure that you are inserting it in the correct direction. Insert the card into the slot until you hear a click. Do not force the card. Remove it if you're having problems. Then line up the card with the slot again and try to insert it again. Secure the card into the slot with the slot cover screw you removed earlier. Replace the side panel. Screw in any screws you removed earlier. Attach all cables and peripheral devices to your computer. Restart the computer. Windows will automatically detect your new high-speed USB port. b> Install an External Card b> Turn on your computer. Locate an available PC Card or ExpressCard slot. Insert the card into the slot. The card will click when seated. Allow your operating system time to detect the high-speed USB port and to install the drivers required. Hope this helps.

b>

Oct 06, 2012 | Ultra Products Ultra U12-40528 SuperSpeed...

1 Answer

My book doesn't have power


Did you plug it in?

USB Powered Devices:

If you're using USB for power then you either need a powered USB hub or the device must connect directly to the computer's USB port bypassing the hub.

If the USB hub doesn't plug in to the wall socket then it is not a powered hub. Basic USB hubs do not supply power to devices or charge an external device like a cell phone. The hub must be of the powered variety and plug into the wall before you can use it for things like this.

TIP:
Get two USB hubs, one powered and one not. If you're using a USB hub for anything other than connecting a flash drive or your wireless keyboard and mouse receiver, get a powered one. Doing so allows you to charge multiple devices through USB and it will provide power to other peripherals like a laptop cooling pad, external hard drives, etc.

Sep 29, 2012 | Western Digital My Book Essential 1TB...

1 Answer

Usb are not allowed to connect the computer


Try this basic troubleshooting first:

If you have a problem with a USB device, try these methods first:
  1. Unplug and then plug in the device.
  2. If the computer prompts you for a device driver, read the information that was included with the device, or visit the manufacturer's Web site to see whether a driver is available.
  3. Run Windows Update to obtain the latest fixes for Windows XP. When this is complete, plug in the device to see whether it is installed correctly.
If the problem persists after you try these three methods, you can use the "Advanced troubleshooting" section to try to resolve the issue.

Because USB devices are Plug and Play devices, there is little that you can do to control or configure them. However, you can trace most USB problems to one of the following conditions:
  • Malfunctioning or incorrectly-configured hardware
  • Malfunctioning, incorrectly-configured, or missing device driver
  • Mismatched cabling
  • Out-of-date firmware or basic input/output system (BIOS)
  • Incorrectly-configured root hub
You can use the following troubleshooting tips to check for each of these conditions to help you resolve USB device issues.
Malfunctioning or incorrectly-configured hardware loadTOCNode(2, 'moreinformation'); Typically, if you plug a malfunctioning or incorrectly-configured device into a USB port, it causes the computer to stop responding (hang). In most of these instances, you must physically turn off the computer and turn it back on to reset the bus. Be aware that it may be more difficult to identify which device is malfunctioning or is configured incorrectly. If another computer that you know is working correctly is available, try to plug the device into that computer to see whether you encounter the same issue.

If the device is plugged into a secondary hub, unplug the device from the hub, and then plug the device directly into the root hub.

Many hardware problems (such as high or low power, bandwidth shortage, malfunctioning or incorrectly-configured firmware, and so on) can cause issues to occur.

Check Device Manager to be certain that the root hub is functioning correctly. If the root hub is displayed with an exclamation point (!) in a yellow circle, verify that the BIOS is assigning an interrupt request (IRQ) to the root USB controller. This is required for the device driver to be loaded. For more information about how to use Device Manager to troubleshoot hardware issues, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
133240 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/133240/ ) Troubleshooting device conflicts with Device Manager If no devices work when you plug the devices into the root hub, verify that the power requirements of the bus are not being exceeded. USB devices can draw a maximum of 500 milliamps for each connection. If a device tries to draw more power than this, the specification recommends that the computer should be able to disable that specific port until the computer power is cycled (this is known as "suspending" the port). In addition, if the device draws less than 50 milliamps, the port never becomes active.

Check the Power tab in USB Root Hub properties to check the power usage of the USB bus.
Malfunctioning, incorrectly-configured, or missing device driver loadTOCNode(2, 'moreinformation'); When you plug in a USB device, the computer should load and then configure the device without ever requesting a device driver (assuming that the device falls within the defined and supplied class drivers). If the computer prompts you for a device driver, check with the manufacturer of the device to determine whether a driver is available.
Mismatched cabling loadTOCNode(2, 'moreinformation'); There are two types of USB cables, high speed and low speed. Low-speed cables differ from high-speed cables primarily in their shielding. If you plug a high-speed device into a low-speed cable, you can cause signal distortion over long distances.

Verify the USB chain is working correctly to be certain that a device that requires the ability to draw power from the hub is not plugged into the chain on the other side of a non-powered hub. This causes that hub and all devices down the chain to be suspended. If the hub is a powered hub, verify that the power supply for that hub is configured correctly.
Out-of-date firmware or BIOS loadTOCNode(2, 'moreinformation'); The key to all USB devices is the firmware. The USB device's firmware contains all information about the device. A port is not reset until all descriptors in the firmware have been loaded and verified by the root hub. This is important because it applies to items such as printers and modems. Make sure that you have the most up-to-date firmware that is available for both your computer's BIOS and each device.

The symptoms of malfunctioning or incorrectly-configured firmware might be unusual. Typically, when you remove and then re-add a USB device, the device becomes available again. However, the device may be displayed as a second instance of that device, and load itself as such in Device Manager. If you see duplicates of a device, verify that you have the most up-to-date firmware for that device. This issue is common with USB printers and modems. A similar issue that has the same cause occurs when a device loads a device driver, and then adds a second device for which there seems to be no driver. The second device is displayed with an exclamation point in a yellow circle in Device Manager. The device may work correctly. However, you cannot remove the "ghost" device until you unplug the parent device that seems to have generated the ghost device. Also, you may be able to resolve this issue by updating the firmware or the device driver for that device.
Incorrectly-configured root hub loadTOCNode(2, 'moreinformation'); USB controllers require that an IRQ be assigned. The IRQ line is assigned in the computer's BIOS, and usually IRQ 9 is assigned.
Remove and reinstall all USB controllers loadTOCNode(2, 'moreinformation'); To remove and reinstall all USB controllers, follow these steps:
  1. Click Start, click Run, type sysdm.cpl in the Open box, and then click OK.
  2. Click the Hardware tab.
  3. Click the Device Manager button.
  4. Expand Universal Serial Bus controllers.
  5. Right-click every device under the Universal Serial Bus controllers node, and then click Uninstall to remove them one at a time.
  6. Restart the computer, and then reinstall the USB controllers.
  7. Plug in the removable USB storage device, and then test to make sure that the issue is resolved.


If all else fails,


In your BIOS Settings:

You need to go in the section of the devices. This section is called Peripheral Setup Integrated Peripherals or sometimes (as there are several types of BIOS, it is possible that this section is still another name). After this, go to the line named USB Function Controller, USB or sometimes. Then you place the arrow keys on your keyboard the word Disabled and press the + button. In principle, the word Enabled is displayed. You have therefore activate the USB ports on your computer. To save this change in the BIOS, tap the F10 key, then answer Y (Yes) to the message that appears.

(this may change depending on the motherboard)


Jun 20, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

I have a model m01517 5 port usb hub. It has 2 usb cables to the computer, do I use the blue or black connector? I can only get one port to recognize a device plugged in the other four seem to be dead,...


Not sure I understand this hub either. Looks like only one port is a USB 2.0 port, but here is a snippet from the manual......

This iConcepts USB Hub provides the electronic interface between USB devices and the host, It allows up to five USB devices or Hubs to connect an upstream USB Hub or Host port.

Features
• One USB 2.0 port
• 4 Port USB 1.1 and support high speed (480 mbps) and 4 port full speed (12 mbps) operations.
• The USB 2.0 port can operate both USB 2.0 & 1.1 Devices
• USB 2.0 port supports self powered mode and bus - powered mode, indicated by a powered LED .
• Over current detection and protection


Manual is provided here: http://www.sakar.com/p-1124.aspx?categoryid=182

Sep 09, 2010 | Sakar (M01517) 5-Port USB Hub

1 Answer

USB hub not working?


When you get USB devices, some have their own power, like a plug-in hard drive, and some get their power from the host, like jump drives. My USB scanner gets power from the host, but if you plug it into a USB hub, it sucks the power from the host. Too many of those devices and the scanner fails, so they suggest you don't plug it into a hub.

Here's where the BUS and SELF switch come in. Somewhere, there is a 6v DC power supply that either came with your Belkin or is optional. If you use it, and put the switch on SELF, you don't have to worry about what you plug into the ports. If you don't care, or don't have the power supply, you can put the switch on BUS, but be aware that not all USB devices you plug into the hub will work, or a combination of two devices may not work.

Carl

May 20, 2009 | Belkin ExpressBus (F5U021) 4-Port USB Hub

1 Answer

My computor switches off the moment i plug in the wd passport.


Probably a power issue. Your new computer has less extra power capacity and the external drive is pulling from the USB port power.

What you need is a USB hub with an AC adapter that powers the hub and any devices that are connected to it from the external AC power adapter and NOT from the USB bus. In other words look for an external power adapter that plugs into the wall as well as into the USB port. Don't get a recharger for an iPOD as that will not do you any good. And don't get a hub that says "powered" or "external power" that does not have an AC power adapter because it is still sucking power off of the USB port.

Try shopping for a D-Link DUB-H4 High Speed USB 2.0 4-Port Hub. It is a good choice if you are not going to plug any USB 1.1 devices into it. Read the reviews for any device you choose.

Oct 26, 2008 | Western Digital Passport WDXML800UE...

2 Answers

Cpqusbfw usb hub


i have one of those hubs the ac adapter is output +5V, and current 0.2 - 2.5A, inside of connector is pos(+), outside is neg(-), input: 100 - 120 Vac and 0.45A Max

Aug 30, 2008 | Micro Innovations Compaq CPQ24USB

1 Answer

USB malfunction


Hello jaybear

The most likely problem is your USB bus is underpowered for supporting your external hard disk drive along with other USB devices.

First, this is actually a good thing in a way. The reason is, it is actually telling you right up front that your USB bus is underpowered for this device. That's a huge improvement over issues caused by underpowered USB buses in the previous model computers. In those, we were left to having to figure out what the problem was when a USB device inexplicably stopped or didn't work.

What is happening is, your new hard disk drive(s) (HDD) are trying to run off of power supplied by your computer's USB "bus" (circuitry). This is OK for USB devices needing low power. But in the case of external hard disks, it's "iffy" whether there'll be enough power on the USB bus to support even one of them, much less two or more. Particularly on laptop computers.
Have no fear. This problem is easily remedied. :)

You need only attach an A/C adapter to each of your external hard disk drives and you should be OK.

If that is not an option, connect a **powered** USB hub to your laptop and plug the external HDDs into the hub instead.

By "powered" I mean a USB hub that comes w/ an A/C adapter. In either case, using a powered USB hub or attaching an A/C adapter to your hard disk drives will remove the external hard disks' power load from your laptop's USB bus and provide sufficient power for the HDDs to run.

You can find USB hubs at Newegg.com and lots of other online high tech stores. I like Newegg because their prices are competitive, their customer service is excellent and there're customer reviews of most of their products there as well.

If you have any more questions, comments, observations - anything at all, just let us know. We're here to help.

Otherwise, PLEASE, take a moment to rate the solution that best addresses your problem. If the solution provides a "fix" for your problem, then a **FIXYA** rating would be very much appreciated. :)

Thank you
BJ @:)

Apr 16, 2008 | Acer Aspire E380-UD420A (ASE380-UD420A)...

1 Answer

External Hard Drive -- too much power for my USB port on my computer


Hi mhjohn

First, this is actually a good thing in a way. The reason is, it is actually telling you right up front that your USB bus is underpowered for this device. That's a huge improvement over issues caused by underpowered USB buses in the previous model computers. In those, we were left to having to figure out what the problem was when a USB device inexplicably stopped or didn't work.

What is happening is, your new external hard disk drive (HDD) is trying to run off of power taken from your laptop's USB "bus" (circuitry). This is OK for devices needing low power. But in the case of external hard disks, it's "iffy" whether there'll be enough power on the USB bus to support them. Particularly on laptop computers.

You need only attach an A/C adapter to your external hard disk drive (HDD) and you should be OK. If that is not an option, connect a **powered** USB hub to your laptop and plug the external HDD to the hub instead.

By "powered" I mean a USB hub that comes w/ an A/C adapter. In either case, using a powered USB hub or attaching an A/C adapter to your hard disk drive will remove the external hard disk's power load from your laptop's USB bus and provide sufficient power for the HDD to run.

You can find USB hubs at Newegg.com and lots of other online high tech stores. I like Newegg because their prices are competitive, their customer service is excellent and there're customer reviews of most of their products there as well.

If you have any more questions, comments, observations - anything at all, just let us know. We're here to help.

Thank you,
BJ @:)

Apr 15, 2008 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

Memory upgrade


I like all the information you gave. However the information you are looking for is in the manufactures web site. goto search engine and enter your computers manufactures name followed by the word "support" find the site and then look up the details for your computer. The reason I say this is because each slot can only control a certain amount of memory. The manufacture will tell you what each slot can control and also the type of memory supported by your motherboard. THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT> never mix memory. Make sure of speed and capacity. If you mix diffrent speed and capacities the results could end in total failure.

Sep 19, 2007 | Computers & Internet

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