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Crate VC6212 Amp

No I didn't move any wires. I bought a Boss ME-33 multieffect to run through the effects loop, and the effects are good but the tone just sounds off after using it the past couple weeks, and sometimes my Amp gain doesn't completely switch off when switching from the distorted channel to clean. I read on another site that the effects loop tube may be bad, since this controls the overall gain on the amp but I'm not sure.

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  • jhandfield2 Jan 28, 2009

    I actually got this fixed. One tube was starting to fail, so my guitar tech replaced it. I also resoldered a connection in my footswitch, which was adding to the channel switching problem. The amp now sounds fine.

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  • 4,234 Answers

Yes the tube could be what is called microphonic. In other words it behaves like a mic and feeds some signal back into the amp. These are usually 12ax7 tubes and are not expensive. Start with replacing that tube.
Keep us posted.
Dan

Posted on Apr 07, 2008

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Hello im sorry but not speak english a litle, im need picture of power amplifier crate model spa-1200 made in u.s.a.fabricated for slm electronics,1400 ferguson ave. st louis mo. 63133 and not found...


Hi,here is the one upper version of it as "Crate SPA1400 model " 1400 watt Stereo Power Amp.they are identical ..
Hope this helps! Take care and please Remember to rate/vote and give me 4 Thumbs Up for me to continue for Helping out the Community :) Thanks

Crate SPA1400 Stereo Power Amphttp://cgi.ebay.com/Crate-SPA1400-Stereo-Power-Amp-/270771488929?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3f0b3d08a1

Jun 25, 2011 | Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

Would I be able to connect Yamaha eq 70 equalizer to Yamaha av receiver RX-V1800 Thanks.


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose some form of STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? The rest would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Apr 16, 2011 | Yamaha RX-V1800

1 Answer

Hello i need help please..... I have a Technics SU-Z550 and SH-8055 Graphic Equalizer My amp has lost power... lots.! its working one channel louder than the other but the one which is louder still has...


If the same channel is dead on the EQ as is dead on the amp there may be a correlation.

Let's break this into its two parts.

1) SU-Z550: You don't say WHAT source(s) you tried to use on the CD/AUX, TUner and PHONO inputs. The external device itself could be the source of the low volume. Try swapping the Left and Right cables to see if it follows the source channel or stays with the amplifier channel.

Check the controls on the amp to make sure you understand each one's effect on the sound.

"PHONO" is literal and exclusively FOR A TURNTABLE - NOTHING ELSE - EVER.

2) SH-8055: Equalizers don't 'boost' sound, they modify its levels at various frequencies. To do that they should be connected into a Tape loop on your amp. OUTs go to IN's. Then you select the Tape Loop on the amp and that inserts the EQ into the signal path of whatever source you're listening to. It's actions are BEFORE any other amplifier controls such as volume, tone and balance. The EQ itself also has a Tape Loop to replace the one it occupies. Make sure it is not enabled unless you have a Tape Deck on it to use. Choose "SOURCE". The blue LED display is to show you frequencies are present in the program material.

Set all of its lighted band controls at midpoint prior to declaring it defective. EQ is like any spice - a little is good, a lot ruins the recipe.

Mar 21, 2011 | Technics Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

Can i loop my EQ through the PRE-OUT and MULTI-IN of my RX-V661?


No. When you select multi-in you bypass everything in the receiver so you would have no program source exiting the receiver to the EQ.

Use it in the standard MD/CD-R slot.

The following is some boilerplate I made up that should explain some usage limitations.


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.


Okay, back to the hook-up:


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Rec-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Play-Out.


So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer

Jan 26, 2011 | Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

Need to hook up a Realistic model 31-2000 equalizer to a Yahama receiver.


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.



Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out.



So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.


[Or you could obtain a dbx Program Route Selector (check eBay, I highly recommend the 400x, of which I have two) and it would, while only using one receiver Tape Loop, allow for three discrete attachment paths for processors and three for tape decks with the added flexibility of front-panel selection of any and all, with the processors being before, after or between the source or tape decks. Plus it has a dedicated facility for an inline dbx Noise Reduction Processor that can also be juggled around via pushbuttons. Pretty neat.]

Jan 17, 2011 | Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

How to install a audiosouse equalizer (eq 100) onto denon 3805 receiver, without a tape monitor thanks henry


Actually, you have several tape loops: CDR/Tape, VCR1 and VCR2. The bottom right part of Page 7 in the manual shows how to connect a Tape Deck (or any in/out processor).

Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out.

I have a whole array of 2-channel analog processing electronics looped out of one Tape Loop on my AVR - via a dbx 400x Program Route Selector - for making tapes or CD-R Audio recordings and otherwise modifying the analog sound for various purposes.

Aug 12, 2010 | Denon AVR-3805 Receiver

1 Answer

No, i was looking for free advice


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Mon as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Mon is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In jacks; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out jacks.

If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.

Mar 26, 2010 | JVC Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

CRATE PA-B6350 no output


The 2 speaker jacks are wired in parallel. If your subs are 4 ohm rated the amp is seeing a 2 ohm load and may be trying to protect itself - hence the red light. I would suggest you unplug 1 of the subs and see if the problem goes away. You may have a problem with one of your subs. This amp is probably not the best choice for such demanding work as it is not fan cooled. Good luck.

Feb 21, 2009 | Onkyo TX-NR905 Receiver

1 Answer

Hi i use a peavey 6505 Amp head and when i run a seymour duncan pickup booster through the effects loop it blows the amp (possibly the pre-amp fuses) i want to get a volume boost in a distorted setting...


Hi bmwz43

Odd that you keep blowing the head... and with 5 12axl preamp tubes even more surprised that you cannot get enough gain... :) Get the correct pedal for the 6505 and change yo levels that way. Hard to beat classic tube amp for tone:)

Check the the amp has the correct impedance setting for the quaddy you are using.

One more thing, what sort of cable do you have connecting the amp to the speaker box. If you use a cheapo guitar jumper lead arrangement, expect that to give you trouble AND **** tone. The 6505 has 120watts of cranked up tube output. Tube output stages need a solid at least 18 gauge cable and quality connector jacks, like Switchcraft. They can blow fuses if you don't use a decent speaker connector lead.

Get back to me here if it does it again, and check to see exactly which fuse you are replacing. It can help sort out the problem.

regards
Graeme

Apr 27, 2008 | Audio & Video Receivers

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