Question about Nikon Action Binocular

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Why do I get double vison when looking through my binoculars

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Because the optics have shifted..it has to be recollimated...gl...capecod389@yahoo.com

Posted on Dec 18, 2010

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The eyepiece yoke is bent or broken; it's by far the single most common fault which occurs to binoculars. Attempting yo unbend it is not accurate enough and usually breaks it. A broken yoke cannot be glued as the loads are too great for the tiny contact area, and even if you could glue it you'd end up with a bent yoke...

The ONLY fix is to replace the yoke, but it's not a cheap repair and on some models requires specialist tools to set up the binoculars correctly again. Also you lose any nitrogen gas filling (not vital).

In reality, the repair is only worth doing to really expensive binoculars or if yours are covered by an accidental damage insurance policy. Yours weren't cheap, but a new pair will cost less than repairing yours and will have a full manufacturer's warranty.

Posted on May 28, 2010

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SOURCE: Just dropped binoculars on edge, prism moved, double vison result

If that's the case then you cannot repair them on a DIY basis as the prism needs to be very accurately reset and the binoculars ideally require refilling with dry nitrogen afterwards. Some repairers won't even touch them as they are very definitely at the budget end of Nikon's range and so not really built with repairs in mind.

Given that repairs of this nature will cost far in excess of the price of a brand new pair (generally about £60 in the USA and £90 in the UK) it may be a wiser decision to sell yours online as a "spares or repairs" item and to use the proceeds towards replacing them. LIDL and Aldi in the UK regularly sell a rubber coated pair of 10x50's for just £10-£15 and I've been stunned at the image quality and the build quality has been proven to be astonishingly good: better than many £100 models which I've used. The only problem I've had is that some have a very stiff focussing wheel (straight out of the box), but both stores have always exchanged them or given a refund without fuss.

If you still wish to investigate the repair option then I can recommend Intrasights in Crewkerne who should be fairly close to you. I've used them a number of times and been very happy. They're also rather cheaper than my regular local repairer, Kay Optical. Note that neither company will want to agree with my assessment of the LIDL and Aldi binoculars though!!

Sorry there's no quick DIY fix on offer, but I hope that my reply has helped you to decide what to do next. Please take a moment to rate my answer, or please add a comment if there's anything about my reply which you want me to expand upon.

Posted on Mar 30, 2010

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I see double image unless I take the lens as close as the binoculars can go


thats how binoculars are. Yours in this case is really strong. the closer you are to something, looking at it, the more magiflyed you going to be. try view things far a distance, really far away. no more double right?
Everything you need to know to become an expert:
on this website: http://www.chuckhawks.com/binocular_basics.htm
It is surprising how many people do not know how to focus binoculars correctly. There are two common focusing systems used in binoculars.
The first is individual eyepiece focus. This system is simple to understand, and easy to manufacture. It also lends itself well to sealed optical tubes, and thus is usually the focusing system used for waterproof binoculars. Individual eyepiece focus means that to focus the binoculars to your eyes, you simply focus the left eyepiece to your left eye and the right eyepiece to your right eye. There is no centrally located focusing mechanism. It is done like this. Look at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right binocular), and focus the left eyepiece to your left eye. Close the left eye (or cover the front of the left binocular), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. You are finished, until you need to look at something at a different distance, in which case you need to repeat the process.
Because individual eyepiece focus is time-consuming, center focus is more common. Unfortunately, very few people understand how to correctly use center focus binoculars. Here is how it is done. Aim your binoculars at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right tube), and focus the left side of the binocular to your left eye using the center focus control, which is concentric with the pivot shaft between the binoculars. (Note: the left eyepiece itself does not focus on center focus binoculars.) Next, close your left eye (or cover the front of the left tube), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. DO NOT touch the center focus control while you are focusing the right eyepiece to your right eye. Now you are finished. What you have just done is adjust the binoculars for your individual eyes. (Practically everybody's left and right eyes are different.) From now on, you only need to adjust the center focus control when you look at things at different distances. Center focus is faster and easier to use than individual eyepiece focus, once you have initially set the binoculars for your eyes.
Binoculars are commonly described by using a pair of numbers, as in "7x50" or "8x25." The first of these numbers refers to the magnification offered by the binocular. Magnification is why most people buy a pair of binoculars. In the examples above, "7x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at appear seven times closer than it does to the unaided human eye. "8x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at eight times closer than the unaided human eye. "10x" makes things look ten times closer, and so on. The first number used to describe binoculars always refers to their magnification. Common binocular magnifications are 6x, 7x, 8x, 9x, and 10x.
There are also variable power (zoom) binoculars, such as 7-21x50. These almost always perform much better at the low power setting than they do at the higher settings. This is natural, since the front objective cannot enlarge to let in more light as the power is increased, so the view gets dimmer. At 7x, the 50mm front objective provides a 7.1mm exit pupil, but at 21x, the same front objective provides only a 2.38mm exit pupil. Also, the optical quality of a zoom binocular at any given power is inferior to that of a fixed power binocular of that power. In general, zoom binoculars are not the bargain they seem to be.
Remember that everything (including movement) is magnified when you look through a pair of binoculars, especially your own shakes and tremors. So the higher the power, the harder it seems to hold the binoculars steady. 6, 7, or 8 power binoculars are easier for most people, even those with very steady hands, to hold reasonably still. The higher powers sound like a good deal, but often result in jiggly, blurred views. This is why 7x binoculars are chosen by so many experts, including the military.
Power affects brightness. Other things being equal, the higher the power, the dimmer the view. And power also affects the field of view of the binoculars. Again, everything being equal, the higher the power, the smaller the field of view. So, as you can see, power must be balanced against other desirable characteristics when choosing binoculars.

May 09, 2011 | Bushnell 240842 Binocular

2 Answers

Focusing problems


Hello Samaro,

This effect is produced when the tho sides of the binoculars are not focusing the same.
Since you sayit is present at long distance, it might be that one barrel is stuck and is not focusing the same as the otherone when you scroll the middle "focuser".

What you can do is open it up and try to clean it, also see if there is something, that is making one of the lenses not move forward as far as the other one.

Good luck,
Dahaka

Jul 28, 2008 | Fujinon CD Binocular

1 Answer

One image is slightly above the other at all distances. After using the binoculars for even a couple of moments, my eyes are strained. The problem was present when the binoculars were purchased, however...


The oculars are not aligned properly causing double vision. Check on the binoculars to see if there is a place to adjust the alignment of either of the oculars. Look for any loose screws that may cause the two oculars to be out of alignment.
If this is not the case try adding some torque to the binoculars to see if the will adjust to where they will both point in the same direction. The eyes can fuse disparate images slightly but there is a very small range that they can handle. If the two images are separated by more than this small amount it will cause eye strain and double vision.

Feb 13, 2011 | Minolta 10x25 Activa D WP XL Pocket...

1 Answer

Just dropped binoculars on edge, prism moved, double vison result


If that's the case then you cannot repair them on a DIY basis as the prism needs to be very accurately reset and the binoculars ideally require refilling with dry nitrogen afterwards. Some repairers won't even touch them as they are very definitely at the budget end of Nikon's range and so not really built with repairs in mind.

Given that repairs of this nature will cost far in excess of the price of a brand new pair (generally about £60 in the USA and £90 in the UK) it may be a wiser decision to sell yours online as a "spares or repairs" item and to use the proceeds towards replacing them. LIDL and Aldi in the UK regularly sell a rubber coated pair of 10x50's for just £10-£15 and I've been stunned at the image quality and the build quality has been proven to be astonishingly good: better than many £100 models which I've used. The only problem I've had is that some have a very stiff focussing wheel (straight out of the box), but both stores have always exchanged them or given a refund without fuss.

If you still wish to investigate the repair option then I can recommend Intrasights in Crewkerne who should be fairly close to you. I've used them a number of times and been very happy. They're also rather cheaper than my regular local repairer, Kay Optical. Note that neither company will want to agree with my assessment of the LIDL and Aldi binoculars though!!

Sorry there's no quick DIY fix on offer, but I hope that my reply has helped you to decide what to do next. Please take a moment to rate my answer, or please add a comment if there's anything about my reply which you want me to expand upon.

Mar 28, 2010 | Nikon Action 7204 Binocular

1 Answer

Seeing double in 12x50 powerview binoculars. I don't see double in other binoculars.


The optics have shifted. Either the front objective housing have been knocked sideways in the body thread, or the intermal prisms have moved. If they are new binoculars take them back to the place of purchase and ask if they can repair them or know of a repair agent.

Dec 25, 2009 | Bushnell Powerview 13-1250 (12x50)...

2 Answers

Seeing double when I look with both eyes. Out of


Step 1.
Adjust the eyepiece or both if both are adjustable back to zero. It should be printed on there. If it's not, then halfway. To find halfway turn them to one end, count the number of turns like 1 and a half turns for example, and then half that atnd turn it that ammount. You've now reset the binoculars to zero.

Step 2.
Now to focus. Pick your target that you want to look at thoguh your binoculars. Look through the binoculars and close the eye with the adjustable eyepiece or your right eye if both are eadjustable and focus the image on the left eye with the central focus knob. Once you've got it focused close the left eye, open the right eye and if it's not in focus adjust the EYEPIECE focus, not the central one, until it's in focus.
If you can't get it in focus because the eyepiece focus won't turn far enough in one direction, turn the OTHER eyepiece in the opposite direction at max, start the process again from step 2.

If it's all ok now you need to adjust the distance between the eyepieces. Open the binoculars as far as they go, look through the binoculars with both eyes on the target and move the binoculars inward slowly until you remove any black edges around the image, then move them very slowly inward until you see only one image.

If you've got more problems come back as ask. :-)

Nov 27, 2009 | Vector Audubon 8x42 Binoculars

1 Answer

Image appears double and slighly off when viewing


I was having a double vision problem with my Barska 10-30X50 zoom, 195FT/100YDS binoculars. One image was always higher than the other. This was tolerable at low zoom, but was further aggravated the more I zoomed in. I found that I could grasp both barrels and twist them in opposite directions (one side up, the other side down) and force the two images to merge--but that was a strain and an unpleasant viewing experience. As an experiment, while looking through the binoculars, I grasped the far end of the right barrel and twisted it on its axis. Nothing happened at first, but after a certain amount of resistance it began to rotate independently of the body. Lo and behold, this shifted the barrel's axis, and the image for that eye moved vertically! I turned it until the two images merged, and now I'm thrilled to say that the problem is solved! I don't have a clue if this would work on any other brand or model, but it's worth a try!

Apr 06, 2009 | Tasco Sonoma 16-840WA-1 (8x40MM) Binocular

3 Answers

Binocular Double Vision


We can align yur binoculars for your for 25-30.00 plus 5.00 to ship back to you. Some units have handy set screws to make adjustments from outside the unit. Call me, wwwbinocularservice.com
Art

Mar 05, 2008 | Magpix B350 Binocular

1 Answer

Binocular double vision


you binoculars are probobly out of alignment. Having them realigned costs about $100. If the binoculars aren't expensive, you might want to try this yourself. Basically, one of the front lenses is off-center, and you can rotate it in its mount until the alignment is right. (I.e., it's off center in the right direction.) You will need an optical spanner (which Americans redundantly call a "spanner wrench") or an improvised substitute in order to do this.

Feb 12, 2006 | Nikon Action Binocular

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