Question about ASUS P5S800-VM Motherboard

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Didn't connect the 4 pin ATX

Hey guys,

I've just swapped computer cases - straight swap, no new parts - and forgot to replug the 4 pin ATX power cable before plugging it in. I plugged it in for about three seconds - twice :-( - and now my computer is not booting up. I've no idea what to do now, I've disconnected and reconnected all cables again, I've tried a boot disk and I've tried clearing my RTC RAM. I didn't expect any of these to work, and wasn't disappointed.

My computer has been booting up for between 2 and 10 seconds, then turning itself off. The longest single boot followed the clearing of my RTC RAM, but this could just be coincidence.

How do you fix this mistake? Does anyone know of a solution?

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Just a guess, but I had a similar problem with an Asus board. I finally tracked it down to the power on/off switch sticking on when I tried to turn the machine on. Under normal circumstances it only engages for a short time and is then released. If the button is held in continuously then the PC tries to start and almost immediately shuts down.
Not sure why though.

Posted on Apr 04, 2008

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New GA-990AX-UD3 motherboard will not boot


You really should take that Power Supply, and use it on grandma's computer.

The 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable was brought out, to provide more power To the motherboard AND processor.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#eps8

The 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable has TWO yellow wires.
Yellow wires are 12 Volt wires. (And two Black ground wires)

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

The 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable has FOUR 12 Volt wires.

In the motherboard manual, does it say, "Yes Tom. Go ahead and use a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable. We don't care. We just use an 8-pin EPS for fun."

[ This is an 8-pin PCI Express power cable. Completely different,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress8 ]

The motherboard probably uses 150 Watts by itself.
No Ram Memory, no CPU, no fans, etc.

The CPU could use up to 125 Watts of power. Just depends on what AMD, socket AM3, processor you are using.

Now to graphics card's power;
The most Wattage a PCI-Express x16 slot can deliver is 75 Watts.

The most power a 6-pin PCI Express power cable can deliver is 75 Watts.
8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable? 150 Watts.

When buying a Power Supply you should calculate all components needing power,

http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp

,then buy a Power Supply that has AT LEAST 10 percent more power than needed. Easier on the Power Supply.
Also a computer will NOT use more power than it needs.

10,000 Watt power supply, (Exaggeration ), and the computer only needs about 100 Watts for surfing the internet?

Computer ONLY uses 100 Watts.

Due to the price, the above, and the availability, you should use a 500 Watt power supply at least.

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=899123&CatId=1079

http://www.amazon.com/StarTech-6in-Pin-Power-Adapter/dp/B002O21XHQ

Or use it on yours if it has enough Wattage.

Back in the day, the motherboard didn't need to supply that much power to components on it.
More powerful Processors, Ram Memory, and graphics cards, brought the power needed, up.

A 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable was added for the motherboard. Then 6-pin PCI Express power cable for graphics cards. Then the 8-pin PCI Express power cable for graphics cards. Lastly the 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable.

(Better make sure the Power Supply you have is good, if you wish to use the above power adapter cable. Nothing like having a Power Supply with a weak voltage power rail, and a new build, to pull your hair out on )

http://www.gigabyte.com/products/product-page.aspx?pid=3894#ov


Out of the motherboard manual Page 23,

"With the use of the power connector, the power supply can supply enough stable power to all the components on the motherboard. Before connecting the power connector, first make sure the power supply is turned off and all devices are properly installed. The power connector possesses a foolproof design.

Connect the power supply cable to the power connector in the correct orientation. The 12V power connector mainly supplies power to the CPU. If the 12V power connector is not connected, the computer will not start.

To meet expansion requirements, it is recommended that a power supply that can withstand high power consumption be used (500W or greater). If a power supply is used that does not provide the required power, the result can lead to an unstable or unbootable system."

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Oct 25, 2012 | Gigabyte Technology GA-990FXA-UD3-...

1 Answer

Gateway dx4822-01 power supply


Gateway DX4822 Desktop PC,

http://support.gateway.com/us/en/product/default.aspx?tab=1&modelId=2291

Just a regular Ol' ATX power supply. Rated at a maximum wattage rating of 300 to 525 Watts. Two different power supply options offered.

Power Supply case size is;
6 Inches Wide, by 5-1/2 Inches Long, by 3-1/4 Inches Tall. (152.4mm Wide, by 139.7mm Long, by 82.55mm Tall )

Has the following power cables;

A) 1 -> 24-pin ATX main power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

[ NOTE* Color of connector on power cable, OR motherboard, does NOT matter.

Proper connector, proper power cable, DOES matter; connector color does not matter ]

B) 1 -> 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

{ Power to the motherboard, and all components connected to it }

C) 2 or more -> SATA power cables,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#sata

{ Power to a SATA harddrive, and/or power to SATA optical drive/s.
(CD/DVD drive) Or power for an upgrade in the future, for a SATA optical drive }

D) 3 or more -> Standard 4-pin Peripheral power cables,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

{ Power for an IDE (PATA) harddrive, or drives. Also power for IDE (PATA) optical drive/s. Plus power in some instances, for computer case fans }

E) Two or more Small 4-pin Peripheral power cables,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#floppy

{ Listed as a Floppy Drive power cable. Back in the day when the article was written, such was true.
It can still be used for a Floppy Drive, but is more used now as a power cable for a;
1) Card Reader.
2) Computer case fans (IF needed }

It's name is Small 4-pin Peripheral power cable. It is smaller than it's larger cousin, the Standard 4-pin Peripheral power cable.

Also has smaller gauge of wiring. This means it cannot carry the same amperage, as the standard 4-pin Peripheral power cable.

I would recommend this,

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=899124&CatId=1483

A) 1 -> 20 + 4-pin ATX main power cable.
Can be used as a 20-pin ATX main power cable, or a 24-pin ATX main power cable, which is what you need.

B) 1 -> 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable.

C) 6 -> SATA power cables

D) 4 -> Standard 4-pin Peripheral power cables

E) 1 -> Small 4-pin Peripheral power cables

F) 1 -> 6-pin PCI Express power cable

G) 1 -> 6/8-pin PCI Express power cable.

In the future, (Or now if you have one), you can upgrade to a better graphics card, that needs an additional power cable, IF you wish.
The 6-pin PCI Express power cable.

You also have a 6-pin or 8-pin PCI Express power cable.
(6/8-pin PCI Express power cable)

All the pins can be used together, and make an 8-pin PCI Express power cable, for a very powerful graphics card that requires this cable.

Just added bonuses with today's modern power supply's.

For additional questions please post in a Comment.
Regards,
joecoolvette

Jul 04, 2012 | Gateway DX4822-01 Power Supply 575 Watt...

1 Answer

Case switch connected to motherboard is messed up. i need a new switch for the case or the configuration for the pins on the motherboard to be able to use a new case/new switch


The Power On switch is located inside the plastic Power On button assembly.

It is a Momentary Contact Switch, and is named an ATX power on switch.
This ATX Power On switch I have found fits many computers,

http://www.directron.com/atxswitch.html

The plastic front panel of a desktop computer is the Front Panel.
The pin area on the motherboard, that the cables (Wires) from the Front Panel connect to, is the Front Panel header.

Tell me the manufacturer name, and Model Number of the computer, or tell me the manufacturer name, and Model Number of the motherboard, and let me see if I can find a Pinout for it's Front Panel header.
(What pins the cables connect to)
Post in a Comment.

Nov 12, 2010 | Motherboards

2 Answers

System won't turn on but when i pushg down on one side of the power suply connectore the fan starts running but computer stioll won't turn on it used to boot up then opne day stopped


It sounds like you have a faulty connector - I would return the item under warranty. Otherwise, if it is out of warranty, you will have to source a new motherboard.

Nov 23, 2009 | ASUS COMPUTER INTL P5SD2-VM MBD MATX LGA...

1 Answer

E210882 socket type 775, PCIe, DDR2 - Will not turn on


Hi,
On the Dell board, the
CORRECT pinout for J8H1 is as follows:

1-3: HD LED (#1 is +)
2-4: PWR LED (#2 is +)
5-7: PWR ON/OFF
6-8: RESET
5,16: +5V
10,11,14,15: not connected
12,13: GND


Regards.

Jul 27, 2009 | Dell (E210882) Motherboard

1 Answer

Swapped mother board


Hi Paul,
see page 8 number 15 for location. Than see page 19, System Panel Header in your manual.
The basic wire color's for positive are red, blue, green & can also be light blue, light green, light red.
Negative wires are usually white or black. Case wire colors do vary from case to case.
To see pin one shown on page 19, (positive + for hard drive led = HDLED+). Bottom row farthest pin to the left of set. Pin two is above pin one. Pin two is, PLED+ (known as power led). Pin 3 is to the right of pin one & is HDLED- (Hard drive led, negative). Pin 4 is above pin 3 & is also PLED-, (Negative for power led). ECT!
6781222.jpg If your new case has an internal speaker (Used for P.O.S.T, power on self test). This would connect to, Chassis Speaker Header located on page 8, number 16. Again, normally only two wires are used across the 4-pin connector. (One at each end of the connector).

To see ASRock's main site for the 775VM800 motherboard click this link:
http://www.asrock.com/mb/overview.asp?Model=775VM800&s=

Good luck Paul!
Run into a snag, just post the issue here.

Mike

Nov 02, 2008 | Asrock 775VM800 Motherboard

1 Answer

Powering up


You need to remove the cap from 8-pin EATX12V connector and connect 8-pin EPC +12V power plug from your P/S, otherwise it will not work. Your power supply should support 8-pin EATX12V. If you P/S comes with 4-pin connector only you just use your 4-pin open spot and leave the cap on.

May 22, 2008 | ASUS P5K Deluxe/WiFi-AP, iP35, S 775,...

1 Answer

System and Processor fans don't spin- anything else is working


Your description indicates your power supply may be faulty or there is a break somewhere in the 24 pin main ATX cable wiring.
Swap out the power supply. Make sure your PSU has a 24 pin ATX connector & (not a 20) pin & a 4 pin ATX_12v connector for the CPU.

Feb 17, 2008 | Gigabyte GA-M61P-S3 Motherboard

1 Answer

Redundant hot swap psu's to EPS 12V (24-pin) ATX Power Supply


rpi.jpgthis is the psu
zalman.jpgthis eps 24 pin
as u can see the matter at hand can be preformed, as long as the fitting is compatable

Jan 29, 2008 | Motherboards

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