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Tv makes humming noise when on. how can I eliminate or reduce the nose?

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Some of the larger TV's are DISH ready, meaning that they have the tuner inside for SAT TV. The SAT tuners often have an internal fan that makes a humming noise. If it sounds like something other than that, you might have a bad component in your sound circuit that allows 60 HZ hum through the speakers.


If it is a rear projection LCG TV it has a fan in it to cool the bulb. You will hear the fan if you listen closely. It usually cannot be heard over the volume.


The fluorescent bulb and electronics inside make humming sound naturally. Kinda like when you turn on a lamp, and some lamps make a low humming sound.

Posted on Apr 03, 2008

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Sound noise feedback during recording


Noise can be a big problem when trying to record into a computer. Reducing and canceling out noise using several simple techniques will help increase recording quality and increase your satisfaction with recordings. Solutions range from complete room overhauls to simple changes in the placement of the microphone and other objects in the recording.


Use a stabilized microphone to reduce vibrations. Many hand-held or headset microphones will pick up on vibrations and movements from the user. These vibrations can carry over into the recording and reduce the quality of the recording. Using a microphone stand or stationary microphone will reduce noise while recording. Mic stands will help increase recording quality and off a possible solution that requires very little financial investment. Set up a designated sound room that is set away from the rest of your home. The farther the recording area is from windows and doorways, the better. Windows allow very small amounts of noise to filter in from the outdoors and create white noise in the recording. Hang blankets on the walls around the recording station and use many rough objects in the recording room. Sound travels in waves that bounce back and forth between smooth objects. Blankets and other rough objects will help reduce sound vibrations. These additions to the recording room will reduce ambient sounds from both the room and outside the building by blocking sound waves from bouncing back and forth in the room. If you can make a considerable investment in the room, there are several acoustic products on the market than help nearly eliminate echoes and outside noises. Install software that filters out unwanted sounds and echoes. Many computer applications exist that use programs to increase the quality of recordings and reduce the ambient noise levels in a recording room. Software is used to reduce echoes and feedback in a recording studio. Several free applications can be used to achieve the desired effects when recording. A program called Audacity is one of the most effective software packages that can help reduce noise in recordings. http://audacity.sourceforge.net/ Software can also be used to reduce electronic humming and other white noise that can be picked up during a recoding session. Buy a high-quality microphone with noise and echo cancellation. One of the best investments that a recording specialist can make is a high-quality mic. The microphone itself can reduce many unwanted noises and echoes in the recording room by filtering the actual sounds that are recorded.


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Jan 15, 2013 | Computers & Internet

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Sound noise feeback during recording


Noise can be a big problem when trying to record into a computer. Reducing and canceling out noise using several simple techniques will help increase recording quality and increase your satisfaction with recordings. Solutions range from complete room overhauls to simple changes in the placement of the microphone and other objects in the recording.


Use a stabilized microphone to reduce vibrations. Many hand-held or headset microphones will pick up on vibrations and movements from the user. These vibrations can carry over into the recording and reduce the quality of the recording. Using a microphone stand or stationary microphone will reduce noise while recording. Mic stands will help increase recording quality and off a possible solution that requires very little financial investment. Set up a designated sound room that is set away from the rest of your home. The farther the recording area is from windows and doorways, the better. Windows allow very small amounts of noise to filter in from the outdoors and create white noise in the recording. Hang blankets on the walls around the recording station and use many rough objects in the recording room. Sound travels in waves that bounce back and forth between smooth objects. Blankets and other rough objects will help reduce sound vibrations. These additions to the recording room will reduce ambient sounds from both the room and outside the building by blocking sound waves from bouncing back and forth in the room. If you can make a considerable investment in the room, there are several acoustic products on the market than help nearly eliminate echoes and outside noises. Install software that filters out unwanted sounds and echoes. Many computer applications exist that use programs to increase the quality of recordings and reduce the ambient noise levels in a recording room. Software is used to reduce echoes and feedback in a recording studio. Several free applications can be used to achieve the desired effects when recording. A program called Audacity is one of the most effective software packages that can help reduce noise in recordings. http://audacity.sourceforge.net/ Software can also be used to reduce electronic humming and other white noise that can be picked up during a recoding session. Buy a high-quality microphone with noise and echo cancellation. One of the best investments that a recording specialist can make is a high-quality mic. The microphone itself can reduce many unwanted noises and echoes in the recording room by filtering the actual sounds that are recorded.


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Buzzing/humming gets louder the brighter the picture...digi pictures come via digital receiver box that supplies the 5 basic non-sat uk channels here in Tenerife...(BBC1 & 2, ITV, 4 & 5). Nothing...


you need a signal attenuator that you should be able to get from radio shack. also make sure you have good wire management... all the power cords wrapped around the a/v cables can cause a bunch of noise.

Mar 07, 2011 | Televison & Video

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Humming sound comes and goes. you can turn off the vol. and you can still hear it. picture is fine.


More often than not humming and buzzing through your speakers is caused by a grounding problem. There are three main ground problems that cause problems in an audio / video system. These are ground loops, improper grounding and lack of a ground altogether. The other possible culprits that can cause noise are bad cables, a faulty piece of equipment or electrical noise from a lighting dimmer or electric motor. There are steps you can take to troubleshoot the noise and eliminate it from your theater or entertainment system.
The first step to is to find out where it is coming from. Disconnect your source and display equipment from your receiver or surround sound processor. If the noise stops, connect them back to the receiver or processor on at a time until the noise returns. When the hum comes back, you found where the noise is entering your system. Note that if you are connecting remote equipment, such as running the signal from your theater room DVD player to the TV in the bedroom, your chances to pick up noise increase dramatically. With such long runs, noise can be induced into the long cable runs from adjacent electrical wiring. It is also easy to create a ground loop, because the equipment is plugged into two different, widely separated outlets, on different electrical circuits.
If the noise is caused by a cable box, the noise is likely caused by the cable TV ground. To test this theory, disconnect the incoming cable TV feed to the rear of the cable box or TV while they are still connected to the rest of the system. If the noise is eliminated by disconnecting the TV cable , the problem is the cable TV ground. You can electrically decouple the cable TV feed from your system with a ground breaking transformer. These are available from many sources. Be advised that many newer, digital cable TV systems require any device in the signal chain to pass a full 1,000 Mhz. Some of the older ground break transformers will not do this. Be sure to check the specifications of whatever device you are purchasing to verify it will pass the digital cable TV signal.
If the noise is from your projector, TV, or monitor, it is most likely caused because the video display device is plugged into a different outlet than the other a/v equipment. It could be on a different circuit as well. These circuits may have two different ground potentials. That is, the resistance to ground is different on each circuit. A difference in resistance to ground from one ground point to another can cause the dreaded ground loop. If you get a ground loop, current flows between the two components. If the current flows through the components internal audio signal ground, you will get a hum.
You can use an isolation transformer, similar to the type used for cable TV ground problems, to eliminate the electrical connection from one component to the other. These transformers are inserted in line with the audio signal connection between the two components. If there is no audio connection between the components, the problem may be current flowing through the video portion. In this case, a video isolation transformer should be used to eliminate the ground loop.
Sometimes power conditioners will stop noise problems by placing equipment on different, electrically isolated outlets. This is done using isolation transformers. This can be ineffective however, due to the differences in internal construction of different power conditioning equipment. Some safety regulations, such as UL 1950, specify that an isolation transformer is only allowed to isolate the hot and neutral wires; the grounding wire must be passed straight through. If this is the case, the ground loop problem may still exist because many communication circuits are connected to the grounding conductor and not the neutral. In this case, the isolation transformer, or any power conditioner or UPS with an isolation transformer will have absolutely no affect on the grounding problem.
The noise may be generated externally, from a dimmer or refrigerator compressor for example, and coming in through the main power input on the audio video equipment . In this case, a high quality power conditioner may be effective in reducing or eliminating the noise problem. You may also find that one of the signal interconnecting cables in your system is faulty. This can also cause noise problems. Check for this by swapping the cables with one that you know to be good.
You can solve most noise problems in your home theater or multi room audio/video system by taking the systematic, step-by-step approach. Work your way up the signal chain, eliminating each piece of equipment as you go. If you have nothing connected to your speakers except the speaker wiring, and they still hum, the problem is noise induced into the speaker wiring from adjacent power cables. Other than that case, most problems are caused by ground problems, which you can find, and solve, if you take it one step at a time. Hope this helps. Let me know if I can help you with anything else.
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Replacing a flyback is not something I would suggest for anyone with no electronics experience. Second, lets see where the noise is coming from first. Take off the back and listen to the noise. The flyback will be at one end of the large red wires that go to the tubes. Sometimes the connection at the tube is not 100% and the noise comes from there. BE CAREFUL - there are high voltages going through this red wire that can be dangerous even with the set UNPLUGGED!! IF the noise is coming from the connection at the tube, with the set unplugged, carefully turn the rubber cap back and forth touching only the rubber part with one hand. Put the other hand in you pocket while doing this.

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Using an isolation washer (rubber) at the very top of the struts, (under the frame support) with a similar rubber washer under a steel washer with the strut fixing nuts should cure the problem.

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